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Hi, My name is Dana I am a new member. I am a new doberman owner actually to 2 littermates a male and a female. They are 11 weeks old. I know I'm not ready for the invisible fence yet because of the age of my pups, but does anyone have any input on how the invisble fence has worked for them with their dobes? I live in a rural area and my concern is that they may ignore the collar that is to deter them from going through the electric current to get a deer, squirrel, rabbit, or even another dog. Any input positive or negative would be a great help.
I look forward to learning alot from site.
Thanks!
Dana
 

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I'm actually against invisible fences. While they may keep a dobie in, it does not keep others out. Other dogs,animals or people can still come in the yard and then what can a dobie do. Keeping the dobie safe was a higher concern to me, than keeping them in. Also, in my opinion, dobies can probably tolerate the shock of going through the fence line and once they are out, they probably will not come back in the yard. I buckled up and got a real fence, which is more pricey and I'm glad I did. No problems.

I have a neighbor that has an invisible fence for their labs and we, the neighbors, spent the first year bringing their dogs back to the house. They would endure the shock just to get out of the yard.

The concept of them having on a shock collar and when they approach the fence line, they get a shock. Its a training thing and they learn that a shock is associated with going to the fence line. I prefer the actual fence for peace of mind. just my opinion.
 

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I agree with Kratty this breed of dog would totally ignore any kind of shock to chase a rabbit/squirrel etc, their pray drive is usually pretty darn high,i have known members of my gang run through thorn bushes to get to a rabbit.
 

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I am also against the invisible fence. I like my fence to keep my dogs in and keep others out. My aunt had one for her newfie and he kept walking through it. She ended up getting a real fence. I'd rather invest my money in something that I know will work personally.
 

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I used it in a rural area and it worked fine until Cole saw a deer or a squirrel. He knew he would get zapped and you could actually see him prepare himself for it. Still didn't stop him. I now have a real fence and can't tell you how much better I feel about it.
 

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I think that if you have a really large area to fence (like an acre or more) that invisible fencing is ok for the outside perimiter, but I would still have a fenced area for times when you cannot be standing outside with them and/or night time. I don't personally like them, but I do see uses for them.

Right now you have immediate issues with trying to raise two litter mates together - not a good idea. They will bond to each other instead of to you, and things like housebreaking might be more difficult.
 

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I am on the opposite side of this issue. We put in fencing about 4-6 weeks ago and to this point we love it. Yes, I do realize at some point that I may change my mind. We had a problem with Copper running to the next door neighbors house and "guarding" their front steps. Since we have put the fence in we have not had any problems with Copper even attempting to leave the yard. The system that we have starts beeping when they reach the warning zone and only when they get to the boundary line do they get a shock. Copper has crossed once and only once, and that was the same day that we installed the system. There is some training for the dog that comes with these. You as the owner need to teach the dog where the boundary is. Copper has learned the boundary area very well, and this has been tested a few times as I have a 4 year old that likes to open the patio door and let the dog out by "accident". Copper has not left the yard or showed a desire to leave the yard.
 

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I don't have one but my sister does and they like it. you have to evaluate the dog that you will be using it on. But from what i've learned most sporting breeds don't do well on it.
 

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I originally was a skeptic but, my sister had a doberman, who has since died of old age. She lived in a rural area and she did fine on the invisible fence. Her current dog is now on it, and no problems there either. I have a lab and a doberman and we had an invisible fence installed. The lab has been on it for a year now and our dobie (my velcro puppy) will go on it when I think the need arrises. They are out only when I am out. I have seen our lab stop short and not go after a squirrel, ball, etc. It works very well. The key is the company you have install it and the training that is involved. Self installs do not do as well as professional installs. Ask the company about their success rate. Ours was about 99%. Full refund if it did not work either. Each dog has their own setting on what they need. Hope this info helps a little.
 

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I had an invisible fence with my lab/dane mix years and years ago.... the knucklehead would brace himself and run though it when he wanted out after something bad enough. On the otherhand I have a co-worker that uses one on her beagle and retreiver, they come and go as they please in and out of the house, and she has never in 6-7 years had them get out, except when the batteries in the collars died, another big risk..... not to mention you can't control what comes INTO the yard with your dog. All and all, I say Nay to invisible fencing ;)
 

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Lexus said:
when the batteries in the collars died, another big risk.....
Is the invisible fence also powered by electricity? So if your power were off, you'd have no fence as well?

I know of several dogs who have run through electric fences when the urge to chase overtook them. And they sure won't come back through it to return. I know of one who was killed / hit by car after running through it. Just not worth any of the risks, IMO.
 

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I would also say no just because sometimes in rural areas they have feral dogs running loose could come in and kill your dogs while they were young maybe not when they are adults though.My mother-in -law lived on 88 acres in Iowa no fence at all most of her dogs were shot,ran over,took off after females in heat she did not have them very long. Before she moved to the city she had coyotes trying to lure her small house dog out to the pack so they could have dinner. One time she saw a pack of coyote/dog mixes about 30 something unheard of she called the neighbors to let them know about the large pack. No one believed her until some men in the area also saw them had to call the state game warden to bring in trappers. Do not think even adult Dobes could go up against 30 coyote/dogs.
Patches Mom
 

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MaryAndDobes said:
Is the invisible fence also powered by electricity? So if your power were off, you'd have no fence as well?

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Good point.... Didn't even think if that. And I don't know about everyone else, but we get our power interupted sometimes several times a month. One time it was out for two days just a few months ago.
 

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The key is the company you have install it and the training that is involved.
Although I agree with going with a good company and doing the proper training, which I did do, the bottom line is the amount of prey drive a particular dog has.
 

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We live on an acre and are in the process of purchasing more land behind us, untill that is done we decided to wait on a traditional fence and use our invisible fence. I have a lot of fosters come in and out of our home, each one is trained on the invisible fence and I've never had trouble with them testing the boundaries, it has also helped in rehomeing them to families without fences. My batteries in the collars last for 2yrs and are sent to me so I don't forget to change them. Also the fence is protected from power outages for 3hrs. We've had our fence for over 3yrs and I absolutly love it. It does beep long before it shocks, and none of my dogs or fosters have ever tested it more than once. With all that said I am still hesitant on putting Lady my rescued doberman on the invisible fence. She has only gotten away from me once, and it was enough to make me want to keep her on a leash. When we need a place to run and play I use the neighbors horse pasture (when the horse isn't in it of course) and that suits Lady just fine. I love my invisible fence, but I much prefer to have a traditional fence, and use the invisible fence as a back-up precaution.
 

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We considered an invisible fence, but the cons far outweighed the pros, so we ended up fencing off a 105' by 30' kennel area with a 5' black vinyl coated chain link fence. The black color blends in nicely with the woods. I sometimes wish we fenced in a larger area, but it already cost us over $2000 for the size of the area we had done!
 

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My 15 month old dober girl does well with her invisisble fence. She chases deer out of the yard (3 acres) right up to her boundry and then stops this is with or without her collar on. The electricity going out concern is overstated, once they are well trained they respect the boundry with or without the collar; and during several hours without power I don't think they will figure it out.

I am hesitant to completely trust it to protect her from outside threats when we are away for any length of time. We live in a rural/suburban area with very few dogs on the loose.

It works fine for potty breaks and periods of time when we are home to monitor what is going on. When I am outside she has the full run of the area and can she circle the house day or night to check things out that concern her. When she alerts to something at night I let her out and she circles the house and comes right back in; my wife likes that!

The initial training is very important to get them to respect the boundry. With that said I will admit that I to had a female lab that would just take it and go. On the other hand the kids brought home a dog agressive pit bull some years back that never wanted to try it after jumping into my arms during his training phase correction. I did have to keep the collar on him when he was out but not for his protection.
 
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