Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,169 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recent conversations have turned into a new topic :) I'm curious to hear your opinion on individuals trying to help.
If my neighbor next door found a stray Shih-tzu that was matted and emaciated and just in all around poor health but was not able to keep it herself, what should she do? The base stray facility charges a fortune ($150.00) I think to turn in a dog, reguardless if it is a stray or not. Would it be better off if she simply closed her door to the dog or to bring in it and do what she can and find it a home? (I realize this scenario is unrealistic because any neighbor of mine would immediately bring the dog to me LOL)
I realize the importance of proper placement with fosters and rescues. God knows if I had 1/2 the money that we've put into "fosters" over the years, Mark could retire tomorrow. But the question begs - If a person takes a dog in off the streets and simply can not afford the time or money but is willing to help it find a home - Would the dog be better off on the street or with the person's help?
Or say a good hearted person notices her neighbor is not properly caring for her dog - Is the dog better off going to a new home that cares for it unaltered or remaining on a chain in the back yard?
I guess I'm wondering what you all think a person who may be financially strapped do when they want to help?
**Although the conversation about Summer brought this question to mind - I do not intend for this conversation to be about her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
I know several occasions when I've been contacted by other rescues or volunteers from shelters that took in a dog in that was gonna get put to sleep that day, hour or minute and took a chance on saving it knowing they had no room, etc.

It's a tough call and I know of people that have closed the door on a dog in need simply because they got burned by other rescues for not doing things "the right way", that happened to a volunteer I had once.

I don't think there's a yes or no answer to this one, sometimes it seems like it's all about the luck of the draw and red tape!

I find that a lot of people help out once then wish they hadn't of bothered.

Sorry for rambling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,330 Posts
This one is a very tough call. My sister and brother-in-law live in rural Ontario, dairy farms on both sides and a conservation area behind their lot. One day in early Feb about 8 years ago, they found a shetland collie outside of their garage door. They left the garage door open enough for him to get in and stay warm and put out food and water. He was there the next morning. They took him to the vet and told him that if someone doesn't claim this dog, they would like first dibs. 'Buddy' ended up becoming their dog - he had been housebroken and obedience trained by the previous owner. Wouldn't even chew on a toy, lovely temperament. He passed away two weeks ago and will be terribly missed.

Taking in a stray that it is good shape physically and emotionally is very different that taking in a dog that has been abused. Some recover given enough patience and love and seem almost grateful to be in their new home. Others never quite recover from the abuse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,589 Posts
All IMO. I really believe putting yourself out there on a limb to "rescue" or "foster" per say is different from not being in that position, or putting yourself in that position and finding a dog.


Senerio A: A person finds a dog unexpectedly in not so good shape, and says "oh boy, I can't just leave you out here to starve or get hit by a car, but I have an infant at home and can't take you home, or other dogs, not enough $ etc" and takes the dog to a shelter or knows that they have a neighbor or family member, whatnot, and just takes it and gives to them, no ties, no strings attatched. Even if that dog ends up getting PTS, it is better in my opinion than starving to death, or getting HBC and crawling in a ditch and dying.

To me that senerio is different from this Senario B:

A person decides that they are going to put themselves out there to rescue and rehome needy and neglected animals. By deciding they are going to put that animal's welfare in their hands alone, by all rights, YES I believe that they should put every effort in the type of home they choose and what medical procedures should be completed before hand.

OR

Senario C: If a person finds or comes across a dog like Senerio A, and decided that they are going to take that animals wefare into their own hands, then they do have a responsibility to do what is best for the dog. Be that spay/neuter, heartworm test, etc. Just because they are choosing to take that animals best interests at heart.

Now I know people that have found dogs unexpectedly and just started leaving food out for them and take them into their house. But not made an effort to grab them, throw them in the van and head out to the spay/neuter table. I don't descriminate against them, as I believe they are thereby claiming ownership (however they may feel) of the dog and doing what they feel is right. (I mean if that turns into "hey this looks like a purebred dog, let's breed it and sell the pups, okay that is a different story)

Make sense? It is all about your choices and the responsibility you put on yourself that makes the deciding factor.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top