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Hello,

I’m flying to LA for thanksgiving and I’ll be bringing my 1 year and 5 months old Mia in the cabin with me as she’s a registered and licensed emotional support animal.

I’m wondering if anyone has experience traveling with puppies in cabin? I’m also looking for something to give her while on flying that will keep her calm, I only give her Natural products and my vet recommended to use Valeriana, does anyone have any other recommendations?

Thanks
 

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Carlo,

Most people who have tried to give a Doberman "something" (like any sort of a calming agent--natural or otherwise) to keep them calm during flights have lived to regret it.

I don't really have any suggestions--she's going to be flying as an in cabin passenger? On leash with you? Didn't know any of the airlines still allowed that--learn something new every day.

Anyway--Dobes, evidently prefer to be alert and aware and any sort of sedation tends to make them anxious. The people I know, who have against all advice to NOT try calming or sedating products pretty much all ended up with dogs who freaked out in their crates and lost control of bowels and bladder and were a mess by the time they got to their destination. I used to fly dogs occasionally but always as live freight and they dealt with even long trips just fine. I also used to be the pick up person for dogs who got stranded by missed flight connections etc when I lived in Sacramento--those dogs usually came in just fine--even those who had been shipped from the east coast as long as they hadn't been sedated.

Good luck...
 

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Big Lil pup
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@ bug...

LOL. My son started flying as a baby. The pediatrician suggested giving him Benadryl or Dramamine to use as a mild sedative or sleep agent. (Same advice was given for extended car trips.)

BIG mistake. He became restless and cried constantly.

When left un-sedated, it was no different than being at home. In fact he liked the activity.

Now of course dogs aren't people. Or are they?...... I'm pretty sure that I was an annoying little Corgi in my last life!

John
Portland OR
 

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Got mutt?
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Who licences and registers ESAs? Last I heard they, like service dogs, had no official registration, buy simply required a doctors note/prescription.

OP, if your dog isn't already fairly bomb-proof in other stressful situations like buses or trains, and large crowds, and hasn't been taught to settle quietly for long stretches of time, then taking her on a plane might not be the best idea. If driving is an option, that's what I would do.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
She actually does very well in closed, tight and even stressful environments, we take her all the times in the subway, cabs and considering that she's an ESA we also bring her with us doing groceries and any sort of stores or boutique we go to. She even came to the hospital once. She's extremely well socialized with people and doesn't really mind other dogs unless they bark or run up to her. She basically never misbehaves, the only case she won't listen is at the park when there are squirrels or mice running around and then she'll lose focus but I guess it's normal for a young pup, however even in that situation there's nothing that a treat can get her attention back.

My plan so far is to let her get really tired prior to the flight, like running around and playing for a solid hour or more ahead of the check-in and then go to the airport and bring her on the plane so that she will crash and be out sleeping for at least 5 or 6 hours which she always does when at home.

Thankfully I'm traveling with my wife and her sister so we have 3 seats next to each other at the back of the plane so if she lays down on our feet she should be fine.

I'll keep you guys updated
 

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As a qualified service dog define via The Disability Act ...I would use no medications on her because the pup is there to support you emotionally. You might need your girl to help you. Just a thought.....but either way hope you enjoy your trip together.
 

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As a qualified service dog define via The Disability Act ...I would use no medications on her because the pup is there to support you emotionally. You might need your girl to help you. Just a thought.....but either way hope you enjoy your trip together.
An ESA is not a service dog, and they do not have the same rights and protections under the ADA as service dogs (and miniature horses) do.
 

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Rosemary is correct, ESAs are not officially licensed nor registered, just like service dogs are not, and do not require any official types of training. Their function is to provide "emotional support" to someone, and they are allowed to fly on airplanes or live in pet free housing. HOWEVER, because their training is often not as extensive as a service dog's training, it can be more disruptive if they haven't been as extensively socialized and trained and prepared for something like a flight. It just depends on the animal.

Hopefully you've worked hard on prepping your dog for the type of stress that flying will cause. There was a case just this past summer of an ESA biting another passenger quite badly on a flight. (Emotional support dog bites passenger on Delta flight | [email protected])
 

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Did no one else catch that apparently this ESA has been acting as a SD with respect to public access? Unless OP lives in one of the very, very few places that give equal public access to ESA as SD they should NOT be going out in places that aren't already dog-friendly such as the grocery store.
 

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I would ask, are you making her nervous?

I would camp with my dog before I would fly with one. I am in charge when I am ground traveling and a complete mess when air traveling. My Dobes would have fed off my anxiety!
 

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I've flown with Morgynn before with him in cabin. I try to avoid it but when I'm gone for a week or more, it's unavoildable as he's my ESA and I need him for extended periods. First off, while they cannot charge you extra to bring him on board, take it upon yourself to book a seat with extra leg room. Usually the seats right before first class is best. Morgynn has a solid stay and curls up tight but I can't imagine him fitting comfortably in any normal leg room seat.

Make sure she is super tired. I let Morgynn run around for two hours before bringing him to the airport. He's generally fantastic around big crowds and I didnt have to give him any meds or anything. He was very nervous upon takeoff the first time but settled quickly. Touch downs are also a little jarring.

Buy a stupid vest. I know it's unnecessary and stupid but it makes a difference. The first time I tried to fly with Morgynn, I was unable to because despite his paperwork being in check and everything being legally complied with, they wouldn't beleive he was an ESA and I ended up having to leave him at home or I was going to miss my flight. The second time around, I bought a vest, they didn't even blink an eye or stangely enough, have to do the ridiculous amount of phone calls they did the first time around. (-_-)

This is of course, assuming that your dog is pretty bomb proof. If not, do not go anywhere near an airport. Lots of noise and rude people. Parents just let their kids walk up to Morgynn, people either cooing over the dog or giving you a stink eye for having one, little obviously fake 'ESAs' in handbags or on leashes barking at your dog. There's a lot of opportunity for things to go wrong and dont put your dog into that situation unless you know she can handle it without a reaction.

Also. STOP TAKING YOUR DOG TO PUBLIC PLACES. It's an ESA, not a service animal. The only places you get to bring them where normal dogs are not allowed is on airplanes and FHA-governed housing. Only service dogs get full public access. Train your ESA in public events where pets are allowed to attend, not in other settings. Keep in mind that to fly and to get housing with your ESA, you need letters from a doctor and the flying letter has to be updated on a yearly basis.
 
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