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Discussion Starter #1
I am new to this and have been searching for hours on end.
This is my last resort.
I am looking for a young (1-3 yr) female rescue up in the Portland area in OR.
I have looked at all the rescues nearby...there are only a few and none are even in this state. I can't even begin to explain how hard it has been to find one..

I live in an apartment with my partner. No other pets or kids. Just looking for a loyal companion that I can take care of and spend my time with. I have been around dobermans a lot and they are my dream dog. After extensive research, I am positive that a doberman would be the perfect fit for me.

Also, does anyone know where I could find some for medical reasons? I also suffer from PTSD and was curious if that would even be an option for me,

Please please help me out! I am dying to have a loving doberman in my arms—even though they are a bit too big to fit :)
 

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Unless you have a genuine disability and your Doberman is your service dog you will find it difficult to rent an apartment that allows Dobermans.

They are one of the breeds that so many apartment complexes refuse to allow in.
I agree with this to a point but I was really close to the ladies in our apt's leasing office and they knew I purchased a dobie and within a week we were doing OB and they loved Gretchen! Never once gave me a hard time about it! BUT G. was NEVER home at the apt. during the day, because dobies love to whine and howl when they're in the cage, at least mine does, and I think THAT would have been our biggest issue.

You could try asking for permission but if you want to rescue you're going to have your fair share of "issues" that the dog has, could be reactive, that would be hard in an apt., could hate the crate and howls/whines.... For the most part I don't think an apt. is a great place for a Doberman and esp. a rescued Doberman.
 

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PTSD is a genuine disability, and many do have service dogs for it. Therefore an apartment would have to try and accommodate if he is trained to do specific tasks to aid you in your everyday life with regards to your PTSD.

Have you checked shelters? I found my girl at a local human society.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Unless you have a genuine disability and your Doberman is your service dog you will find it difficult to rent an apartment that allows Dobermans.

They are one of the breeds that so many apartment complexes refuse to allow in.
I am going to try very hard not to be offended by the disability comment. :rolleyesww:
You do not have to be returning from war to have PTSD. As a survivor of multiple violent sexual assaults, I have been diagnosed very clearly with PTSD. As well as other related disabilities that have accumulated in response. Just because it is not a disability you can see, does not mean that it does not impair my ability to function normally.

That being said, I have already talked to the apartment management company and they are thrilled. There is no issue whatsoever with me having a doberman. Multiple folks at my complex have dobermans, boxers, and I have even seen pitbulls. :nicejob:The noise factor is also no issue. The building I am in is an all dog/pet building. It is brand new and mostly sound proof. Our place is fully surrounding by dogs that bark all of the time. Hence why they made it an all dog/pet building so no one would be bothered by it.

I am in the Nursing field and work mostly NOC shifts. This means that I work through the night, not the day. My partner on the other hand works 6-4. So, very rarely would the dog be by itself. Also, we spend much of our free time at my partners farm where there is extensive gated in land with other dogs and barn animals. And if the dog is not comfortable there or with with other dogs/animals, we have other back up plans. I am not kidding when I have considered pretty much everything. I want to rescue because I find rescuing to be the better thing to do. Also, having a mate to work with, train, walk, and challenge me is what I am seeking. I absolutely know that rescue dogs come with their past and I know that it can be daunting for a while. I am fully prepared and understand what I am getting myself into.

I have done my research, I am not just some person getting on here because one day I woke and decided I want to rescue a doberman. I have purchased everything I need, "dog—proofed" the apartment, payed the dog deposit already, found a vet, and more. All I need now is the dog itself! :sweat:

SO....if there are any more comments that are going to question my motives or ability to handle the responsibility, please keep them away. I only posted on here, KNOWING what it would take to own my own rescue doberman.
It is sad all of the negative feedback I have gotten compared to the few positive. To those who have given positive feedback, I truly appreciate it.

I have looked into Mt.Hood and sent them an email about it. Hopefully I can get something back from them. Thank you very much for the reference! :)

Also, I have searched shelters from all around portland and haven't been successful at finding any. I am checking daily for one to pop up. :(
 

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I found my girl at a Shelter too. It took about 4 months of searching on Petfinder all the shelters within driving radius but eventually I found her.
 

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I am new to this and have been searching for hours on end.
This is my last resort.
I am looking for a young (1-3 yr) female rescue up in the Portland area in OR.
I have looked at all the rescues nearby...there are only a few and none are even in this state. I can't even begin to explain how hard it has been to find one..

I live in an apartment with my partner. No other pets or kids. Just looking for a loyal companion that I can take care of and spend my time with. I have been around dobermans a lot and they are my dream dog. After extensive research, I am positive that a doberman would be the perfect fit for me.

Also, does anyone know where I could find some for medical reasons? I also suffer from PTSD and was curious if that would even be an option for me,

Please please help me out! I am dying to have a loving doberman in my arms—even though they are a bit too big to fit :)
We don't get many dobermans turned in around the Portland area. The rescue I used most recently is the Seattle Pure Bred Rescue. I am on the board of MHDPC and this is my recommendation. Otherwise there is a much larger selection in CA.

Is there a particular reason you want a rescue? I like to rescue but when I look for a year or so and can't find one, I usually buy from a breeder either a puppy or a rehomed adult (rescue with papers).
 
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VZ's Dobe is her service dog.

A lot of people DO try to take advantage of the laws, and call their dogs service dogs, when they actually aren't. I was in a couple of Facebook groups for families dealing with autism, where one of the most frequent questions about dogs was "how can we get our family pet certified as a service dog", when the dog had no training whatsoever specific to their child's needs.
 

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I am going to try very hard not to be offended by the disability comment. :rolleyesww:
I stated facts. I have a service dog and live in an apartment. If you reread my post no where did I state you didn't have a bona fide disability only that in order for you to have a service dog that helps you with your issue you will need something other than "oh, he's my service dog" when looking for housing. There are so many who take advantage of this law.

You do not have to be returning from war to have PTSD. As a survivor of multiple violent sexual assaults, I have been diagnosed very clearly with PTSD. As well as other related disabilities that have accumulated in response. Just because it is not a disability you can see, does not mean that it does not impair my ability to function normally.
See my answer above.

That being said, I have already talked to the apartment management company and they are thrilled. There is no issue whatsoever with me having a doberman.
By law they can't quibble about what breed your service dog is.

Multiple folks at my complex have dobermans, boxers, and I have even seen pitbulls. :nicejob:The noise factor is also no issue. The building I am in is an all dog/pet building. It is brand new and mostly sound proof. Our place is fully surrounding by dogs that bark all of the time. Hence why they made it an all dog/pet building so no one would be bothered by it.

I am in the Nursing field and work mostly NOC shifts. This means that I work through the night, not the day. My partner on the other hand works 6-4. So, very rarely would the dog be by itself. Also, we spend much of our free time at my partners farm where there is extensive gated in land with other dogs and barn animals. And if the dog is not comfortable there or with with other dogs/animals, we have other back up plans. I am not kidding when I have considered pretty much everything. I want to rescue because I find rescuing to be the better thing to do. Also, having a mate to work with, train, walk, and challenge me is what I am seeking. I absolutely know that rescue dogs come with their past and I know that it can be daunting for a while. I am fully prepared and understand what I am getting myself into.

I have done my research, I am not just some person getting on here because one day I woke and decided I want to rescue a doberman. I have purchased everything I need, "dog—proofed" the apartment, payed the dog deposit already, found a vet, and more. All I need now is the dog itself! :sweat:

SO....if there are any more comments that are going to question my motives or ability to handle the responsibility, please keep them away. I only posted on here, KNOWING what it would take to own my own rescue doberman.
It is sad all of the negative feedback I have gotten compared to the few positive. To those who have given positive feedback, I truly appreciate it.

I have looked into Mt.Hood and sent them an email about it. Hopefully I can get something back from them. Thank you very much for the reference! :)

Also, I have searched shelters from all around portland and haven't been successful at finding any. I am checking daily for one to pop up. :(
I don't see any of the responses in this thread as negative. Stating facts...yes. Not negative.

Also, not every Doberman has the makings of a service dog.
 

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I have two thoughts about your situation.

1) You may have to choose between a Doberman and a Service Dog. While a fine breed, many Dobermans aren't suited for service work. Not that it isn't possible but finding one, particularly through rescue, may prove challenging.

2) Rescuing a young adult Doberman is very possible but I suggest you devote time each day to scouring the web for your ideal dog. Dogs in rescue is a very fluid situation, changing daily, if not hourly. Last July we adopted our second Doberman. Our criteria was a female no older than three months. At that time we found two in the United States. One was in CO and the other in GA. Living in Miami, we went with the Georgia pup who was also younger. After a 17 hour road trip, Echo was in her new home. Be prepared to travel to find what you're looking for as it will open up the possibilities.

Best wishes for success!
 

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I think this may answer some questions and clear up any misconceptions.


Revised ADA Requirements: Service Animals
Very good document- I recently looked up service dog regulations, etc after watching a news special about how many people fake it by just buying a harness online. It was very disturbing to me to know so many people take advantage like that. Sadly, I found out a guy at our work does this so he can take his dog on the plane. Ugh, what a disgrace when people fake these things.

I was shocked to learn that service dogs don't have to wear an I.D badge on their jacket/harness. I guess I always thought they did and business could ask to see a dogs service dog I.D (very interesting that its not the case).
 

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There are bogus sites all over the 'net that sell service dog credentials so that you can fake it. To those who do that crap I hope your butt festers. You make it more difficult for the people who have a genuine disability and need their service partner.

It also reflects poorly on true service dogs when one of these fakers acts out when in public. It embarrasses all the hard working service dogs who are doing their jobs daily.
 
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