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Discussion Starter · #101 ·
A dobe will run themselves ragged ~in the moment~ -
It's been said to me by much more experienced than i that even using a chuck it or "flirt pole " can be overdone when they're not full grown.

My boy's breeder strongly advised that allowing them to run themselves to "their own limit" as much as they want is fine....but that a chuckit on say a football field(as i was doing to wear him out) can easily be overdone.

(We were trying to figure out why one of his toes on show side back foot was sticking out when this came up)

You can still wear your boy out- just mind how you accomplish that :)

Your boy sounds very sweet. I hope whatever happens is in both your best interests.
Now I understand.

Comparing the jogs my boy and I go on in the mornings compared to the exercise he expels using a chuck-it is very different. The jog is far more less intense. He runs at probably the same pace you'd see in a show-ring for about 15 mins once a day, which once again is less than the intensity if I let him out into the yard for his zoomies.

Thank you. Just in the past few days the bond between us is slowly changing in a positive way, since heeding the advice given on this forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #102 ·
Yes it can be used a broad term but if you read Meadowcat's post on training, you will see the 4 quadrants and realize that discipline is a form of punishment and can't be treated as a positive reinforcer.

What I want you to understand is that you get really good results with dobermans if:
a) you reward for correct or NEAR CORRECT behavior (next session you up the goal and try for correct or MORE correct)
b) you don't do anything more than 3 times - that's drilling, dobermans don't like drills
c) you use really good rewards like string cheese, liver, toys that squeak and mix it up.

Behaviors you don't want should be ignored, after which they will escalate for a little while, and then will go extinct. It is called extinction of behavior - real term. Our young dobes "try it on" a lot during the under 12 mths period but a lot of it is that we ignore new behaviors they come up with, they escalate (the behaviors) to make sure they are doing it right, get no reward, it starts to head for extinction.

There are a lot of strange things about training. Daisy Peel's blog shows how she clicker trained a chicken to run a chicken-sized agility course going over jumps, up A-Frames, thru tunnels (I think - it's been a while) and around loops etc. Not with a trail of food, but with a clicker reward for completing the obstacles. She trained them in tiny parts of each behavior and then would join each behavior to the last and moved the reward to the newer bigger behavior. That's how we should train our dogs. If you lean over a dog and tell him sit, he will most likely do a rock-back sit i.e. walk back onto his rear end and sit. If you stand up and lean forward a bit, he will most likely walk forward into his sit onto his front legs - assuming you have trained with food rewards.

I find food works really well for little things close up and detailed like obedience work and toys work well for highly active tasks including the obedience tasks of taking a jump and retrieving etc. Food calms dogs down a bit, even though they are excited about the food, the effect of getting food seems to steady them.

Toys can help make them bounce around, so know what you want and reward appropriately. Please don't use punishment (discipline). A trick if you want to get him off the counter is to use mouse traps facing backwards and where he would probably touch them if he stood up there. The noise and the clatter discourage most dogs.

You don't want to be the source of anything negative - you want it to be at a distance and unrelated to you because otherwise you get the reaction that the dog doesn't want to come to you. I think you have experienced enough of that. I want to be my dog's source of the best game in town so that I am preferred over anyone or anything. If I yell out "banana", Lana will stop and stare at me and then I say "come" and open my arms wide and kneel down - she runs as as fast as she can to me with her tail wagging. I worked hard to get that. She is 13 mth old.

When she was 2-5 mths, she was good and always came to me with her toys. Then she thought she would self-reward and run around in circles with her toys and blow me off. I would just disappear (go inside or somewhere else). Gradually she started coming back and looking for me. Now when I try it, I carry a bit of food on me. When she starts running, I put my hand in my pocket and she just races back to me. So I am bribing her, so what. I don't always need to have food, but I can pick up her toy and we play vigorously. I have taught her a hand signal that hand in pocket is good fun.

So if you are still with me here at the end of long ramble, thank you. I have had dobes for a long time and I used to be a yank and crank trainer and one day a German trainer showed me how to use food placed strategically around the room - he trained security/protection dogs - this would have been over 30 yrs ago. It took me a long, long time to shed my ways - I am impatient, quick to anger, and have been molded by the dogs I have had. You get the dog you need, not the dog you want - sorry. You earn the dog you want.
I guess it will take time to condition myself to ignore the behaviour I don't want and to reward the behaviour I do want. I'm quite a reactive person (blame those sports reflexes) so instinctively I would react immediately to the behaviour I didn't want without a thought. Getting out of that habit is just going to take some time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #103 ·
The folks who are trying to train thru coercion are often repeating commands while NOT getting the desired behavior from the pup.

It teaches them that the English language isn't really something to "tune into" all the time, that sometimes our words can be ignored, and sometimes they don't even understand those words, because of the inconsistencies surrounding the teaching.
Surely, all training is a form of coercion, no? By using something (treat, toy etc) you try to make/coerce them into doing something you want them to do. What would the alternative be?
 

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Discussion Starter · #104 ·
"Canine intelligence", however, doesn't mean they're little robots that come loaded with what you want. They still need to be taught, and intelligence can be a two edged sword. If they can ask "how do I do this?" and "What do I do?" then also might ask "Why should I do this?" and "What'll I get for it?" :lol2:
Something I am now beginning to learn :lol2:
 

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Thank you. Just in the past few days the bond between us is slowly changing in a positive way, since heeding the advice given on this forum.
I am happy to hear this! Your honesty and self awareness during this conversation makes me believe that you want to get through this and make it work with your dog.
 

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oh I do remember those days.. Actually, at 2 1/2 years old, my GSD boy STILL has those days. What can I say, Czech lines tend to mature slowly. I was known to call my breeder and say "What did I do to make you give me this demon dog???" and he would say "I'll take him off your hands anytime you want" and we would joke about it because we knew that I was just venting. Like me, you got exactly what you asked for - an intelligent dog. The thing many people miss is - intelligent and obedient aren't necessarily the same thing.
Repetition? Oh that is out!! If you ask him to do the same thing more than a couple times in a row he looks at you like "geez Mom, haven't you figured this out yet?" and decides that he'll entertain himself elsewhere until I do. Or sometimes, if I seem a bit unsure with my cues he will think "oh I must have done it wrong" and proceed to see how many different ways he can offer the same behavior. Sometimes he does that for fun.
He tends to retain information more if you break it down into smaller steps and let him figure it out for himself. IE if you tried to teach sit with the old-school push down on his butt while pulling up on the collar, he was likely to decide that sit means "stand still while I push down on your butt and pull up on your collar and I'll put you where I want you"
When I let him figure out what the next step should be, he will offer behaviors. By building on a previous step (or just expecting more precision) he solves the problem on his own. Sometimes it will take him a few minutes to work it out and, in the beginning, I will reward at smaller steps (IE with heeling you can click and reward just for the dog starting out from heel and staying by your side, literally a single step. Then you build up slowly from there.)
My friends at training and trials always joke "Did you bring Good Singe or Evil Singe?"
Evil Singe uses his brain for his own entertainment, not figuring out what makes mom happy. Or how to skirt the rules and not get in trouble.
A prime example was in Dec at a fun match for obedience. We had just entered the ring and I had him a bit close to the ring gating. He bumped it with his butt and it swayed. He cocked his head and smacked it with a paw and the gating bounced up and down. Everyone in the room saw the lightbulb go off in his brain and the evil gleam in his eye. For the next several MONTHS we went through correcting and fixing this new game. "Oh, you don't want me to pull it with my right paw? Is it ok to use my left?" "oh not the left either? What about if I push out on it instead of pulling in?"
"geez mom, I can't do that either? What if I accidentally hit it with my butt?"
"oh all right. oops, must have bumped it with my tail. Sorry mom that was TOTALLY an accident"
Then he would swing his butt really wide while heeling and kick it with his back foot. All the while maintaining what looked like a perfect heel and just looking shocked and amazed "wow, something must have hit the gating. I wonder why it is bouncing up and down like that??"
Finally I threatened to kill all my friends because they would smile and try not to laugh but he LIVES for being the center of attention. At puppy class one time, my friend laughed because Singe got flustered and poked me in the butt with his nose when I was trying to teach heel position. I walked around black and blue for weeks because he kept doing it to get a laugh.

What I'm trying to say is, it's a fine line. You can't try to teach too much too fast but you can't teach them with repetition either. Keep sessions SHORT and positive. Use every day situations to teach - sit before you put down his food bowl. down before you throw his ball for him. When you do a more formal session, have him do a new behavior once or twice, move on to something else and then go back to the new behavior.
 

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Daleicious,

It's great to hear the update! I was hoping you would update us one way or the other. It sounds like your frustration level is going down. That's fantastic!

Hang in there. Both you and the pup are learning how to "talk" to each other and if you keep at it slowly and steadily you will build up a language.
 

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Surely, all training is a form of coercion, no? By using something (treat, toy etc) you try to make/coerce them into doing something you want them to do. What would the alternative be?
Not really. If you go down the route of shaping behavior by rewarding the dog when they start to do what you want (without telling them), then the dog has chosen to do that thing. This is what I was referring to when I talked about how Daisy Peel got chickens to run an agility course.

You can "capture" a moment with a click and reward. You will need to read up on shaping behavior because you can't get emotional, you can't name an action until the dog does it right, you can't force it, you need a lot (I mean a LOT) of patience when you first start. Once you get going with this, the dog becomes "operant" - that is they realize they can do something and it might be what you want - so for a while dogs start offering all sorts of behaviors.

I shaped Jill to close drawers and doors. I sat on the floor with a clicker and a lot of tiny treats (think peanut size cheese). I looked at the cupboard door. Jill looked at me and whined. I kept looking at the door. This went on for a few minutes. Eventually she looked at the door - I clicked and treated. Then she looked at it again and again - each of which I clicked and treated. On the 4th attempt I waited her out and she then lifted a paw and touched the door (tentatively). I clicked and treated 3 times then waited - I wanted a heavy thump. I got that then I started opening the door a bit. And so on until I can't leave a door or a drawer open anywhere in the house, because Jill runs up and slams it shut.

The object of the activity was for Jill to understand that she can make a loud bang noise, it is under her control, and she gets rewarded for doing it - she was scared of the noise that the teeter makes when it hits the ground and then returns to normal position. She now does the teeter.

Jill has offered new related behaviors - she finds a chair on wheels and walks it around by placing her front feet on it and walking. I love this and reward her for it because it is a good activity for her abdominal muscles but I didn't ask for it - she offered and I "captured" it by seeing it and rewarding her. Opportunistic capturing - that's how Daisy teaches dogs to sit - she waits until they sit then clicks and treats - when they start to offer that behavior then she labels it "sit" just as she clicks then treats. Slowly move the command to come before the clicker and eventually you give the command, the dogs sits, you click and treat. Of course the dog will perform the task without click & treat once they really know it and a simple "good girl" and a pat is the reward.

Shaping is not coercing, it is capturing what the dog chooses to do and giving it a word. Something to think about, hey? I started clicker training several years ago and shaping (doing it right) with my last 2 puppies. My "I want it now" mentality was hard to get around to allow shaping to occur.

Things to teach with shaping:

Stand on a pedestal (I use a small step stool)
Walk around step stool with front feet on it
Pivot on step stool with back feet on it
Close doors/drawers
Sit
Down (sphinx style)
Down (rolled hip style)
Stand
High 5 (never do this if you don't want to get smacked all the time)
Roll over
Walk backwards
Peek (poke head and front between your legs and sit (a good controlled position when there is a problem) )
Go around a cone
Pick up a dumbbell
Stand on hind legs
Hide face under one paw

Any tricks where the dog gets to move in a way they would offer. With the pedestal, I just simply have it between me and the dog so it is natural for the dog to put a foot on it. Don't lure, but you can set yourself up for success with physical positioning.

The clicker works better for most people because it is always the same noise, and easy to make with a clicker. It is possible to use a word like "yes" but it is not as effective - I have tried both and the clicker drives deeper into their brain and sets of their reward process faster.
 

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Oh, shaping is so fun! It's why Elka knows her trick "Testify!" It's also how she learned how to go lay down on her bed, and we're also working on door closing (but the front door first, then the fridge I think).

Elka Testifies! (I forget how to do the Youtube embed. Again.)


YPoFRH061GQ
:cheeseygrin: (just for you--melbrod)
 

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Oh, shaping is so fun! It's why Elka knows her trick "Testify!" It's also how she learned how to go lay down on her bed, and we're also working on door closing (but the front door first, then the fridge I think).

Elka Testifies! (I forget how to do the Youtube embed. Again.)
Oh so very cute!

Once you get the doors, start working on turning lights on and off - most people have switches they can attach something to so that the whole switch mechanism doesn't get shattered (as happened to me :( ) - but super glue worked, sort of... I think they have big sliders or else they have those pull cords.

I forgot to add - I shaped weave entry using 2x2's and when Jill and then Lana started to go between the poles from the correct side, I clicked & treated. This morning Jenny showed me a video of Zannah doing the plank at home - 1st step toward the DW - she must be almost 12 wks old now. So cute.
 

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I don't mean this in an offensive way, so please don't take it as such. But a dog will ONLY reach the potential that YOUR knowledge, patience, and practice allows for. If you want a better dog, you have to become a better trainer, and continue to learn, research, practice, etc. Almost without exception, the people with the well behaved dogs are the ones that know the most about dogs, and the people with the misbehaved dogs are the ones that know less. I fully believe that 95% of dog training rests on the ability of the humans teaching the dogs.

This is your first dog, and I think you're expecting a bit too much. What you call "I don't see this intelligence" is actually his intelligence working against you. He knows he can get away with something, so he does. When we got our girl a few years ago, she was amazing with me, my wife had a hard time with her. It took a while, but onne day she kinda said "Oh wow, I understand why you've been saying these things all along. Makes sense" Over the past few years she has learned so much, but the biggest thing she has learned, is your dog will do what he/she has been trained, and/or allowed to do. When you see a problem with your dog, think what YOU could do differently next time. That's what it's all about. The best dogs in the world will start misbehaving with owners that are not fully prepared to handle them.
 

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When we got our girl a few years ago, she was amazing with me, my wife had a hard time with her. It took a while, but onne day she kinda said "Oh wow, I understand why you've been saying these things all along. Makes sense" Over the past few years she has learned so much, but the biggest thing she has learned, is your dog will do what he/she has been trained, and/or allowed to do.
This is how it is in our house, only reversed. Bruce will do anything, work and train for me, but my hubby...not so much. He used to get frustrated and say that Bruce wasn't very well trained, until I finally got it through his head that for 9mths Bruce is amazing, but it was him who needed the training. He has been listening, and working very hard with myself and Bruce, and its slowly coming around for the two of them.

It was to the point that hubby would give a command and Bruce would just walk away. I would enter the room and Bruce would instantly do said command (and then some). So I think hubs finally had a lightbulb moment lol. I have to cut him some slack though, he has never trained an animal, whereas I have been professionally training horses, and training my own dogs, for years. Bruce is essentially his first real dog, but now that hes trying harder, hes starting to get it.

(Forgive the lack of punctuation, hubbys keyboard is all messed up and I cant figure out how to fix it haha)
 

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Discussion Starter · #114 ·
oh I do remember those days.. Actually, at 2 1/2 years old, my GSD boy STILL has those days. What can I say, Czech lines tend to mature slowly. I was known to call my breeder and say "What did I do to make you give me this demon dog???" and he would say "I'll take him off your hands anytime you want" and we would joke about it because we knew that I was just venting. Like me, you got exactly what you asked for - an intelligent dog. The thing many people miss is - intelligent and obedient aren't necessarily the same thing.
Repetition? Oh that is out!! If you ask him to do the same thing more than a couple times in a row he looks at you like "geez Mom, haven't you figured this out yet?" and decides that he'll entertain himself elsewhere until I do. Or sometimes, if I seem a bit unsure with my cues he will think "oh I must have done it wrong" and proceed to see how many different ways he can offer the same behavior. Sometimes he does that for fun.
He tends to retain information more if you break it down into smaller steps and let him figure it out for himself. IE if you tried to teach sit with the old-school push down on his butt while pulling up on the collar, he was likely to decide that sit means "stand still while I push down on your butt and pull up on your collar and I'll put you where I want you"
When I let him figure out what the next step should be, he will offer behaviors. By building on a previous step (or just expecting more precision) he solves the problem on his own. Sometimes it will take him a few minutes to work it out and, in the beginning, I will reward at smaller steps (IE with heeling you can click and reward just for the dog starting out from heel and staying by your side, literally a single step. Then you build up slowly from there.)
My friends at training and trials always joke "Did you bring Good Singe or Evil Singe?"
Evil Singe uses his brain for his own entertainment, not figuring out what makes mom happy. Or how to skirt the rules and not get in trouble.
A prime example was in Dec at a fun match for obedience. We had just entered the ring and I had him a bit close to the ring gating. He bumped it with his butt and it swayed. He cocked his head and smacked it with a paw and the gating bounced up and down. Everyone in the room saw the lightbulb go off in his brain and the evil gleam in his eye. For the next several MONTHS we went through correcting and fixing this new game. "Oh, you don't want me to pull it with my right paw? Is it ok to use my left?" "oh not the left either? What about if I push out on it instead of pulling in?"
"geez mom, I can't do that either? What if I accidentally hit it with my butt?"
"oh all right. oops, must have bumped it with my tail. Sorry mom that was TOTALLY an accident"
Then he would swing his butt really wide while heeling and kick it with his back foot. All the while maintaining what looked like a perfect heel and just looking shocked and amazed "wow, something must have hit the gating. I wonder why it is bouncing up and down like that??"
Finally I threatened to kill all my friends because they would smile and try not to laugh but he LIVES for being the center of attention. At puppy class one time, my friend laughed because Singe got flustered and poked me in the butt with his nose when I was trying to teach heel position. I walked around black and blue for weeks because he kept doing it to get a laugh.

What I'm trying to say is, it's a fine line. You can't try to teach too much too fast but you can't teach them with repetition either. Keep sessions SHORT and positive. Use every day situations to teach - sit before you put down his food bowl. down before you throw his ball for him. When you do a more formal session, have him do a new behavior once or twice, move on to something else and then go back to the new behavior.
Your message made me laugh and smile. Thank you.
 

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Surely, all training is a form of coercion, no? By using something (treat, toy etc) you try to make/coerce them into doing something you want them to do. What would the alternative be?
If you mean that we should turn all pet dogs loose to play Born Free and live (or die) in the wild, then yeah, I guess you could make that argument--extreme fringe PETA type folks say that very thing.

But hey, look, it's more about whether you use force and intimidation, or not.

As adults, we have to go to work, right? Unless we are trust fund babies, I guess.

We have choices to make about work--do I want to do this, or that, and why or why not. What appeals to me, what can I live with, what can I not.

Am I willing to do something that is less pleasant than I'd like...because there are great benefits and a big payoff?

How would I feel about doing something not-too-pleasant to me, if my boss constantly yelled, acted irritated, was forever pointing out every nitpicky thing I made a mistake on--by accident, because I never really got much formal training?

What if my boss expected instant compliance for every barked-out-command, even if I were in the middle of something else or I was confused and not understanding what he or she wanted?

What if they didn't even bother to pay me for my work?

Do you think I'd be very happy in my job? That I'd perform it well? Have a great attitude as I went about my tasks?

What if, instead, I was allowed to learn at my own pace, while being coached and challenged, of course? What if I got paid for all the work I did?

What if I got bonuses, regularly, for excellent work?

What if my supervisor was constantly looking for my strengths, and building on them, and pointing them out to me? And ignoring silly mistakes of mine, but rewarding me when I figure out what works well, and praising me for that?

^^^In some ways, dog and human brains work very similarly, and that's not coercion, that's simply fostering a good work partnership, for going forward in life together.

...He tends to retain information more if you break it down into smaller steps and let him figure it out for himself. IE if you tried to teach sit with the old-school push down on his butt while pulling up on the collar, he was likely to decide that sit means "stand still while I push down on your butt and pull up on your collar and I'll put you where I want you"
When I let him figure out what the next step should be, he will offer behaviors...
^^^That, right there.

Said so well, and really such a simple concept.

We humans have an old saying "Learn by doing," and this is true for all learning, really.

When an animal, two or four legged, makes a behavior choice, there are either good, bad, or indifferent consequences for that choice, right?

We learn by the consequences/rewards of the choices we make, and if we do it ourselves, with our own thinking caps on, we learn it and remember it soooo much more thoroughly than if someone just simply walked us thru it.

If I drive someplace new, I'll usually remember it forever. If I am a passenger, riding someplace new, guarantee ya I'll need directions, next time if I have to drive it.

Any of this resonate with you?
 

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Discussion Starter · #116 ·
Daleicious,

It's great to hear the update! I was hoping you would update us one way or the other. It sounds like your frustration level is going down. That's fantastic!

Hang in there. Both you and the pup are learning how to "talk" to each other and if you keep at it slowly and steadily you will build up a language.
Well the last two days were great! There was a routine to the day, which he preferred, and I made extra effort to be more tactile and affectionate (rather than a drill sergeant) and in turn he reciprocated. I also allowed him to sleep in my room with me (not on the bed) to work on that bond and there were behaviours that I recognised when I first got him that came back, which was nice. Although, it did mean I didn't get a night's sleep, LOL.

Today didn't start so well (I thought we'll drop the routine for today, as it's a Sunday and just chill. Bad move). I could tell immediately it was going to be one of those days and it was. However, it's ending in the right direction. We've just had an AWESOME training session, using the clicker, not much talking and using more body language (ie. the eyes, as suggested by vivienne00). It worked and he sat by my side rather than standing in front of me and I didn't have to say a word in order for him to do so. I actually found, by me not speaking, I didn't get frustrated when things were taking longer than I'd like. I was a lot more calmer and together, rather than getting frustrated. It's beginning to work and I'm pleased.
 

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Surely, all training is a form of coercion, no? By using something (treat, toy etc) you try to make/coerce them into doing something you want them to do. What would the alternative be?
There is a difference between bribery, and rewarding. This may be a little tough to understand, I had a hard time with it for a while. You want your dog to understand that his behavior either positively or negatively affects what happens next. You don't want your dog simply working towards doing something he knows will produce a reward, because that leads to 2 things: 1) your dog will no longer give the desired behavior unless you show him a reward, and he knows he will get it: (Bribery)
2) You MUST produce a reward every time to keep the attention.

Think of the people that call their dog over, and over, and over, and the dog pays no attention. They go and get a cookie, and the dog comes immediatly. Prime example of why bribery doesn't work as a training method. The dog was given the option to either listen or not listen, and they chose not to listen. Nothing happened, so why should they if they don't feel like it? However, when a cookie was added in to the equation, now that dog had a reason to come, so he did. You never want "that reason" to be the reward, if that makes sense. I hope so, this is hard to explain lol.

These are things you want to avoid. Done correctly, reward based training phases out the reward quickly, as the dog understands. Eventually you no longer NEED rewards, and they actually become REWARDS, instead of BRIBES.

So the short version is : You want your dog to listen because he wants to listen, since he is learning that when the human is happy, life is good. You dont' want your dog to listen ONLY because you're waving a tasty snack...
 

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Discussion Starter · #118 ·

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Well the last two days were great! There was a routine to the day, which he preferred, and I made extra effort to be more tactile and affectionate (rather than a drill sergeant) and in turn he reciprocated. I also allowed him to sleep in my room with me (not on the bed) to work on that bond and there were behaviours that I recognised when I first got him that came back, which was nice. Although, it did mean I didn't get a night's sleep, LOL.

Today didn't start so well (I thought we'll drop the routine for today, as it's a Sunday and just chill. Bad move). I could tell immediately it was going to be one of those days and it was. However, it's ending in the right direction. We've just had an AWESOME training session, using the clicker, not much talking and using more body language (ie. the eyes, as suggested by vivienne00). It worked and he sat by my side rather than standing in front of me and I didn't have to say a word in order for him to do so. I actually found, by me not speaking, I didn't get frustrated when things were taking longer than I'd like. I was a lot more calmer and together, rather than getting frustrated. It's beginning to work and I'm pleased.
That's awesome.

Every good old trainer I know always has said we humans talk and babble at our dogs way too much, anyway.

I'm glad you found some tools that work for you guys.

I cannot believe none of us have thought yet to point you to a great huge free resource, online--and that is kikopup's youtube channel.

kikopup - YouTube

She's common sense, and does great videos breaking down various behaviors, and the steps to instill them in your pup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #120 ·
I don't mean this in an offensive way, so please don't take it as such. But a dog will ONLY reach the potential that YOUR knowledge, patience, and practice allows for. If you want a better dog, you have to become a better trainer, and continue to learn, research, practice, etc. Almost without exception, the people with the well behaved dogs are the ones that know the most about dogs, and the people with the misbehaved dogs are the ones that know less. I fully believe that 95% of dog training rests on the ability of the humans teaching the dogs.

This is your first dog, and I think you're expecting a bit too much. What you call "I don't see this intelligence" is actually his intelligence working against you. He knows he can get away with something, so he does. When we got our girl a few years ago, she was amazing with me, my wife had a hard time with her. It took a while, but onne day she kinda said "Oh wow, I understand why you've been saying these things all along. Makes sense" Over the past few years she has learned so much, but the biggest thing she has learned, is your dog will do what he/she has been trained, and/or allowed to do. When you see a problem with your dog, think what YOU could do differently next time. That's what it's all about. The best dogs in the world will start misbehaving with owners that are not fully prepared to handle them.
No offense taken. It makes total sense. It's why the world sends it's children to school, right? The teacher usually knows better. This will be a learning curve for me, and that's a small part of the reason why I got a puppy, I wanted to learn (I just didn't realise there was so much more to the story).
 
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