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Von Drax
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16 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Drax is 8 mnths old & of course he's going to do typical puppy things like tear up my couch pillows, stand on the sink, or get into the trash when im not looking. ��

my main issue is his whining!!! We go to the park, we go on walks, he plays in the backyard with the kids (whom he is way too rough with btw), i take him anywhere i can with me! But he just seems to go CRAZY when we're in the house. He will stand on the furniture, knock down my kids, run all over the place! i pin him down and tell him "no" or to "settle down" and he will lay there... for a few seconds and then he goes back to the whining and craziness.

So we try to play with him inside & he is just way too rough. He definitiley doesnt realize how heavy he is and must think hes some tiny pup lol. He hits us (yes hits us) with his biggo feet so i'll hold his hand and talk to him. But yet he still whines and i cannot figure out what he wants!

As punishment ive tried a few things.. rolled up news paper, spray water bottle, my hand and spanking his butt, holding his snout and telling him no whining or no barking. i'll also put him in his kennel for a few minutes and the whining gets WORSE!!! If he whines louder in the kennel i tell him hes going to go outside, he stops for a moment, i walk away and he whines again!

We have gotten a poke collar for him but all that has helped is his pulling on the leash when we go out. He's 80 lbs and way too strong for me to let him pull. lol

I love my dog so much and he does listen with his basic commands for treats. I just dont know what to do anymore and would like some help. My last resort is saving money and sending him to obidience school. Being a single mother with 4 boys.. (yes including Drax lol) i definitley have my hands full and need some guidance.

8 mnths old and will not lay still at all. lol

http://i347.photobucket.com/albums/p458/_joalexis/IMG_5189_zpsrnlaut5y.jpg
 

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Boy Von -- You sure do have your hands FULL !! There a lot of VERY good Doberman people on here with GREAT advice - Say turned - they will be answering you soon .

I looked at your picture of your dog - Great looking boy ! But what I see in his eyes is a wild child : ))) I personally think that you can't get him in school quick enough !!!!!!!!!!!!

I have never used a rolled up paper or spray bottle - AND I have never hit one of our dogs with my hands - I just think that is a wrong way to train any dog -

In your picture - It looked like you still had his pincher collar on him - Right or wrong ??? If right - those collars are for walking - training only - not to be worn all day long - If he is wearing it all the time - that may be why he's whining - it hurts .

We have a 2 1/2 year old male - your right - they don't know there own Strength when playing - But really - Mr. B play's pretty good - yours is still young .

My advice -- listen to the pro's on here - Yet I am a firm believer in getting him in training or watch some video's on training and start as soon as possible

Best of luck !!!!

...Ken
 

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Just like any child they will attempt to control the household if permitted.
Little problems now...but bigger problems later....
Professional training is a must ASAP......stay tuned....
 

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Hairy Dog, RIP Caesar, Katana, Kip, Capri
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....As punishment ive tried a few things.. rolled up news paper, spray water bottle, my hand and spanking his butt, holding his snout and telling him no whining or no barking. i'll also put him in his kennel for a few minutes and the whining gets WORSE!!! If he whines louder in the kennel i tell him hes going to go outside, he stops for a moment, i walk away and he whines again!.....

.....I love my dog so much and he does listen with his basic commands for treats. I just dont know what to do anymore and would like some help. My last resort is saving money and sending him to obidience school.....

http://i347.photobucket.com/albums/p458/_joalexis/IMG_5189_zpsrnlaut5y.jpg
As you seem to have found out, none of the punishment stuff works at all. If anything, if he is whining out of anxiety or because he wants attention, smacking him and so on will only make things worse.

To some extent you need to accept his whining. Dobermans are very vocal dogs.

But in answer to that and to the other problem I singled out here...consistency is the answer. Let him whine in the crate (give him something to do while he’s there to be nice), go about your daily work casually and then the moment he is quiet for a minute or two, let him out. He needs to learn that he should calm down and hang out when you want him to and that you will release him when YOU want to, not just when HE is eager to go. If he accepts that, the whining (in this case) will die out. Of course you should not be using the crate for long periods of time to get him to behave--he does need exercise and a lot of interaction with you to be happy and biddable.


It is an old-fashioned way to deal with things--and it will make some cringe here--but I was told a number of years ago to put my dog in a down stay (he HAS to know what that command means first) and then to put him back in a stay every time he tries to get up--not harshly with force, just over and over, consistently. My trainer said that I should just go ahead and ask him to do that for 1/2 hour; time it on the clock. That is long enough for the dog to accept that he is not going to be allowed to get up, and to relax until he has gotten permission to be up again.

That did work--I suppose it was a method to help him learn how to relax.....but I’m sure there are other better ways out there now. I hope someone else chimes in.

I do always make sure that the dog gets the reward (praise, treat, etc.) WHILE he is behaving properly, and that he continues with that behavior as he is being rewarded. That means no praise after you have released him. If you treat after he gets up, you are basically rewarding him for getting up, and he will be so eager to get that reward and so keyed up, that he will likely never relax enough to learn how to calm himself down.


There is really no substitute for careful step-wise training. Just like you probably expect your kids to take a while to understand a hard math concept, for example, it will take time for your dog to understand what you want him to do. Dogs don’t generalize very well, so a “sit” in the house or backyard with the promise of treats, is worlds away from a sit in the park or when he is off-leash. Again--patient training--and watching his body language so you can see a break coming--don’t push him to the point where he does disobey and finds out that he can. Proactive (distract before it happens) is much better than reactive (trying to stop him after he has blown it) Slow and steady does it, a little bit at a time.

And very important--make sure you can control his behavior (keep him on a leash, perhaps) long after you think he knows what he should be doing. He should know the proper behavior to the point it has become practically a reflex for him--so that he never has a chance to question whether or not he should obey and never finds out that he can when he is out of your reach.


Whatever you do, DON’T send him AWAY to a school. Part of training (a large part) is to teach the owner how to get the dog to do what he wants him to do, using appropriate methods, under all conditions. If you send him away, he’s likely to fall back into the old habits once he comes home. More importantly--you have no idea how the trainer treats him when you are not there; even if the trainer spouts wonderful stuff about how he trains dogs, you really DON’T know. And it is likely that if you’re asking for fast results, he is skipping steps in training--which generally means force.

If you haven’t already, you should go to training classes with him, as much for the trainer’s advice to you about how to deal with a problem behavior, as to teach your dog how to behave properly. If you’ve gone to a class, and he still is a problem, keep at it. Again, consistency is the key.

You may even want to consider hiring a animal behavior consultant to help you pinpoint what you need to do with you dog to get him to be more relaxed and appropriate in a noisy, somewhat chaotic environment (I’m assuming--you said you had 3 boys :) ) You may not even need to spend a LOT of time with the trainer to get some benefit; ask him to come in to help you figure out what the problem is and to give you some ideas how to work with your dog--with the understanding that when you run into a snag, you can bring him back to help you again.
 

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I don't know what other breeds you've owned before or what training experience you have but you need to have a different attitude about the whole situation here. Dobermans do not respond well to the approach you are taking with your boy. You need to reward him for the behavior you want not scold him for being a bored, energetic, inquisitive, smart puppy. He does not understand the latter.

My suggestion is to hook up with a seriously good trainer for regular obedience classes and consider doing some "extra curricular" activity with your boy as well (dock diving, agility, obedience, rally, scent work, etc.)
 

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Okay, whew. I hear your frustration. Take a deep breath.

Now, what you need to understand is that when you punish your puppy, he isn't actually learning the correct behavior. All he's learning is that you're upset, and he's really not connecting it to anything that he's doing. The window for an appropriate punishment to be effective is 3 seconds. It's REALLY tough to correctly time a punishment, and it's also really hard to be fair with a punishment for a puppy. All of his behaviors are normal dog behaviors, and you haven't actually taught him yet what you really expect of him. It's much easier with a young dog to tell him what you DO want by reinforcing good behavior. The best thing you could do right now would be to work with a quality trainer (NOT send him away) who can actually teach you how to train him. My go to starting place to find a good trainer is here: Certified Dog Trainer and Behavior Consultant Directory - CCPDT

He sounds very much like a puppy entering adolescence who hasn't had much in the way of training. With a bunch of kids who rough house and play together and a pup who just hasn't ever learned boundaries (and the kids may be accidentally encouraging bad behavior by not understanding how to play with him in ways that don't encourage him to get riled up and make bad choices) it can be a recipe for a dog that just really doesn't know what he's supposed to do.

Here are some resources that you and your kids need to know about how to interact with dogs:
https://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/kids-and-dogs-how-kids-should-and-should-not-interact-with-dogs/
Stop The 77
 

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Von Drax
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16 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Boy Von -- You sure do have your hands FULL !! There a lot of VERY good Doberman people on here with GREAT advice - Say turned - they will be answering you soon .

I looked at your picture of your dog - Great looking boy ! But what I see in his eyes is a wild child : ))) I personally think that you can't get him in school quick enough !!!!!!!!!!!!

I have never used a rolled up paper or spray bottle - AND I have never hit one of our dogs with my hands - I just think that is a wrong way to train any dog -

In your picture - It looked like you still had his pincher collar on him - Right or wrong ??? If right - those collars are for walking - training only - not to be worn all day long - If he is wearing it all the time - that may be why he's whining - it hurts .

We have a 2 1/2 year old male - your right - they don't know there own Strength when playing - But really - Mr. B play's pretty good - yours is still young .

My advice -- listen to the pro's on here - Yet I am a firm believer in getting him in training or watch some video's on training and start as soon as possible

Best of luck !!!!

...Ken
He definitley is a wild child lol i guess when it comes to discipline its a hispanic thing. i treat him like one of my kids. Even at that, when i say i spank Drax, i mean a little pop on his rear that gets his attention.

We had just come in for a walk and he still had it on. my son was trying to get it off but Drax thought he just wanted to play. so he was giving us a hard time. But other than that we do only use it for walks.

i have watched so many videos and ive trained him to do certain things. he really is a good dog when we're out in public. But when we are home the whining is for anything and everything. it hurts our ears pretty bad. I'll be looking into some classes for us soon. :)

i currently have him in his kennel cos i couldnt even feed my baby without him whining and jumping on us/the table. i walk from the kitchen to the living room and he's pushing me over. or jumping up at me. idk what to do!

im very open to opinions and suggestions on here but some people are just plain rude. its exactly like moms/dads judging other moms/dads about how they chose to raise thier children lol
 

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Von Drax
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Discussion Starter #8
As you seem to have found out, none of the punishment stuff works at all. If anything, if he is whining out of anxiety or because he wants attention, smacking him and so on will only make things worse.

To some extent you need to accept his whining. Dobermans are very vocal dogs.

But in answer to that and to the other problem I singled out here...consistency is the answer. Let him whine in the crate (give him something to do while he’s there to be nice), go about your daily work casually and then the moment he is quiet for a minute or two, let him out. He needs to learn that he should calm down and hang out when you want him to and that you will release him when YOU want to, not just when HE is eager to go. If he accepts that, the whining (in this case) will die out. Of course you should not be using the crate for long periods of time to get him to behave--he does need exercise and a lot of interaction with you to be happy and biddable.


It is an old-fashioned way to deal with things--and it will make some cringe here--but I was told a number of years ago to put my dog in a down stay (he HAS to know what that command means first) and then to put him back in a stay every time he tries to get up--not harshly with force, just over and over, consistently. My trainer said that I should just go ahead and ask him to do that for 1/2 hour; time it on the clock. That is long enough for the dog to accept that he is not going to be allowed to get up, and to relax until he has gotten permission to be up again.

That did work--I suppose it was a method to help him learn how to relax.....but I’m sure there are other better ways out there now. I hope someone else chimes in.

I do always make sure that the dog gets the reward (praise, treat, etc.) WHILE he is behaving properly, and that he continues with that behavior as he is being rewarded. That means no praise after you have released him. If you treat after he gets up, you are basically rewarding him for getting up, and he will be so eager to get that reward and so keyed up, that he will likely never relax enough to learn how to calm himself down.


There is really no substitute for careful step-wise training. Just like you probably expect your kids to take a while to understand a hard math concept, for example, it will take time for your dog to understand what you want him to do. Dogs don’t generalize very well, so a “sit” in the house or backyard with the promise of treats, is worlds away from a sit in the park or when he is off-leash. Again--patient training--and watching his body language so you can see a break coming--don’t push him to the point where he does disobey and finds out that he can. Proactive (distract before it happens) is much better that reactive (trying to stop him after he has blown it) Slow and steady does it, a little bit at a time.

And very important--make sure you can control his behavior (keep him on a leash, perhaps) long after you think he knows what he should be doing. He should know the proper behavior to the point it has become practically a reflex for him--so that he never has a chance to question whether or not he should obey, so he that he never finds out that he can when he is out of your reach.


Whatever you do, DON’T send him AWAY to a school. Part of training (a large part) is to teach the owner how to get the dog to do what he wants him to do, using appropriate methods, under all conditions. If you send him away, he’s likely to fall back into the old habits once he comes home. More importantly--you have no idea how the trainer treats him when you are not there; even if the trainer spouts wonderful stuff about how he trains dogs, you really DON’T know. And it is likely that if you’re asking for fast results, he is skipping steps in training--which generally means force.

If you haven’t already, you should go to training classes with him, as much for the trainer’s advice to you about how to deal with a problem behavior, as to teach your dog how to behave properly. If you’ve gone to a class, and he still is a problem, keep at it. Again, consistency is the key.

You may even want to consider hiring a animal behavior consultant to help you pinpoint what you need to do with you dog to get him to be more relaxed and appropriate in a noisy, somewhat chaotic environment (I’m assuming--you said you had 3 boys :) ) You may not even need to spend a LOT of time with the trainer to get some benefit; ask him to come in to help you figure out what the problem is and to give you some ideas how to work with your dog--with the understanding that when you run into a snag, you can bring him back to help you again.

im getting to that point where i have accepted it but i cant have people over or take him with me to someones house and he's making everyones ears bleed with the whining or pushing all over people. when we go out to stores and parks with him, and hes pretty good. but when we get home, hes a completely different dog.

i only have him in his crate if i go to the store or he's just already been too much and i've about lost my mind lol he sleeps in there at night as well. which is funny cos, i usually go to bed or put him to bed around the same time everynight and he does fairly well.

He knows to laydown where he is when im mad at him lol or even OUT IN PUBLIC he will stay when i tell him to. i even have him walking next to me without me holding his leash. he has it on of course but i dont need to always hold onto him. depends on our surroundings. But i will try the half hour of making him stay and see how that goes! and he is definitley rewarded for good behavior. The staff at his Vet Clinic spoil him rotten but of course i tell them he needs to work for the treat lol and he sure does listen. so most of the time he makes me out to be a liar when i say he's a bad boy at home.

i'll be looking into classes for us soon! He's my boy and dammit he's going to listen to his mama lol thank you for your help!
 

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Von Drax
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16 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I don't know what other breeds you've owned before or what training experience you have but you need to have a different attitude about the whole situation here. Dobermans do not respond well to the approach you are taking with your boy. You need to reward him for the behavior you want not scold him for being a bored, energetic, inquisitive, smart puppy. He does not understand the latter.

My suggestion is to hook up with a seriously good trainer for regular obedience classes and consider doing some "extra curricular" activity with your boy as well (dock diving, agility, obedience, rally, scent work, etc.)
You're right, you dont know what other breeds of dogs i've owned before. If you look at my very first posting on this website, you'll see that i've grown up with these dogs my whole life. But in a different manner. This however is my first personal dobe so i would be asking for help but also know what i was getting myself into. I dont know what attitude you senced in my original post besides a little frustration, but i simply ranted about my situation and ASKED FOR HELP. Not to be told i need to "have a better attitude" about my situation you know nothing about.

You can read previous replies about how i have trained Drax since having him and you'll see that he is a very good boy who does in fact get rewarded for well behavior. ****, he even gets treats for being so damn handsome lol so i am not scolding him as often as you think i am. He is well loved and on the road to being very well trained. im going to be looking into classes for the both of us very soon.

i dont know what any of those things are that you mentioned in the end about extra curricular. But our "extra curriclar" activities are things like going to different dog parks around us in TX, hikes, runs, shopping at any store that allows him inside.. really, anything i can take him to, i will.

its just his whining for no damn reason. when we get home he is a completely different dog and i cant barely walk from one room to the other without him whining at me as loud as he can. This dog has my attention more than you think. Someone mentioned anxiety so im going to have his vet evaluate him and see what he can come up with.
 

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Von - I hope you didn't think my reply was rude to you - If so - then I apologize - I did not intend in that form .

I did take a few minutes and found this on you tube for you , This is set on the dog -- This was the best thing that help our "wild child "

I also use feeding to help train - I ask Mr Business to sit and stay - while I fill his bowl - then I will tell him- it's OK and let him eat - sometimes I have him sit - then lay down - sometimes I do it quick - sometimes I just take my merry old time - All the while he is blowing big bubbles from his lips - :grin2:

I try to work in anything I can with training threw out the day . It don't take a lot of time and it will help you and your dog

Here is the link - Like I said - this - to me - is very important in helping your dog and you - besides - you have helpers ! lol

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2WgOZUebnY
 

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Von Drax
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16 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Okay, whew. I hear your frustration. Take a deep breath.

Now, what you need to understand is that when you punish your puppy, he isn't actually learning the correct behavior. All he's learning is that you're upset, and he's really not connecting it to anything that he's doing. The window for an appropriate punishment to be effective is 3 seconds. It's REALLY tough to correctly time a punishment, and it's also really hard to be fair with a punishment for a puppy. All of his behaviors are normal dog behaviors, and you haven't actually taught him yet what you really expect of him. It's much easier with a young dog to tell him what you DO want by reinforcing good behavior. The best thing you could do right now would be to work with a quality trainer (NOT send him away) who can actually teach you how to train him. My go to starting place to find a good trainer is here: Certified Dog Trainer and Behavior Consultant Directory - CCPDT

He sounds very much like a puppy entering adolescence who hasn't had much in the way of training. With a bunch of kids who rough house and play together and a pup who just hasn't ever learned boundaries (and the kids may be accidentally encouraging bad behavior by not understanding how to play with him in ways that don't encourage him to get riled up and make bad choices) it can be a recipe for a dog that just really doesn't know what he's supposed to do.

Here are some resources that you and your kids need to know about how to interact with dogs:
https://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/kids-and-dogs-how-kids-should-and-should-not-interact-with-dogs/
Stop The 77

oh yes, i am def frustrated lol thank you for that link. im going to be looking into classes for us soon. i couldnt imagine being without him if i sent him off somewhere for training. plus, im the "what if" type that puts a bunch of scary crap into my own head lol i would go crazy imagining what they could be doing to him. ive never even taken my kids to a circus or seaworld!

But i have trained Drax pretty well so far. He listens to his commands about 85% of the time haha. He's really good at listening to me when i call him so i allow him to walk freely depending on our surrounding. He does keep the leash on during just in case tho. I stay home so he has plenty of my attention. But he will whine at me so loud the second i try to sit down. Or walking from the kitchen to the living room is a battle as well cos he tries to jump at me or push me with his huge feet lol

My boys cant even really play with him cos they're kinda scrawny and he just knocks them onto the floor. (10yrs, 5yrs, 1yr) the older ones do try to play rough with him and he gets even more excited and ends up hurting them. i dont punish him for this seeing as how it is my kids fault for hyping him up to play fight and then not being able to take the heat lol But i do seperate everyone so they can all calm down. Drax will go to his kennel for this and he will not stop whining. to me, the point is to leave him there so he knows he needs to calm down. so i put up with his yelling and some normal back talk (which i find hilarious) until he finally settles down. Then i let him out again but its back to the same ol "im gonna start yelling for no reason".

i love my pup so much and im not giving up on him. i just need some reassurance that hes not going to be this hyper and drive me up the wall forever lol
 

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Hairy Dog, RIP Caesar, Katana, Kip, Capri
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The half hour stay--First take a look at this!!
http://www.trainerswithheart.com/resources/Documents/REALLY REAL RELAXATION PROTOCOL.pdf

Basically the method used here is for you to relax with the dog--he is on a loose leash but kept close to you as you sit; you do not play with him or give him a lot of attention--you just hang out with him. At first, you show him that you want him to lie down by luring him into a down position with treats. You go on from that as described--when he lies down, you reward him. If he gets up, you let him up and then wait until he lies down again. If he does, you reward him again.

This is a more modern approach in training a dog to relax when you need him to. This method does not force the dog to assume any position; it rewards him instead when he does that on his own.
 

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Von Drax
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16 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Von - I hope you didn't think my reply was rude to you - If so - then I apologize - I did not intend in that form .

I did take a few minutes and found this on you tube for you , This is set on the dog -- This was the best thing that help our "wild child "

I also use feeding to help train - I ask Mr Business to sit and stay - while I fill his bowl - then I will tell him- it's OK and let him eat - sometimes I have him sit - then lay down - sometimes I do it quick - sometimes I just take my merry old time - All the while he is blowing big bubbles from his lips - :grin2:

I try to work in anything I can with training threw out the day . It don't take a lot of time and it will help you and your dog

Here is the link - Like I said - this - to me - is very important in helping your dog and you - besides - you have helpers ! lol

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2WgOZUebnY

no no, i didnt take your response as rude. it was another person who replied!

LOL yes i try to make Drax sit and wait for his food too! when he succesfully does this, hes snarling and showing me his teeth. kinda like "look mom! im being cute and listening! now let me eat!" hahaha. He does the teeth thing for different situations but never in an agressive way. he's really a great boy.

I work from home so he has my attention 85% of the day so thats def helped train him in what he does know. its just the whining. anywhere we go, for any reason, he will whine. idk what to do for him!

thank you for the video! i'll be watching it in a few minutes.
 

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Von Drax
Joined
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16 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
The half hour stay--First take a look at this!!
http://www.trainerswithheart.com/resources/Documents/REALLY REAL RELAXATION PROTOCOL.pdf

Basically the method used here is for you to relax with the dog--he is on a loose leash but kept close to you as you sit; you do not play with him or give him a lot of attention--you just hang out with him. At first, you show him that you want him to lie down by luring him into a down position with treats. You go on from that as described--when he lies down, you reward him. If he gets up, you let him up and then wait until he lies down again. If he does, you reward him again.

This is a more modern approach in training a dog to relax when you need him to. This method does not force the dog to assume any position; it rewards him instead when he does that on his own.
I've actually tried having him next to me with his leash on. I'll look into it more and see what i was doing wrong! thank you!
 

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I forgot you work from home - so sitting on the dog just may work out great for yeah - :2smile:

Good luck !

...Ken
 

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Von Drax
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Discussion Starter #16
I forgot you work from home - so sitting on the dog just may work out great for yeah - :2smile:

Good luck !

...Ken

seeing that video made me give myself a nice smack on the forehead lol really wish i had seen this sooner!!! Appreciate you so much!!! Going to try this now and see how many times he yells at me :( haha
 

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LOL Mel ! -- I guess ------ Drum roll here please ----- Great minds think alike :grin2::grin2::grin2::grin2::grin2::grin2:

As we posted about the same video - at about the same time :grin2::grin2:
 

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One thing that is really helpful is to keep in mind that even though his body is getting pretty "adult" sized...he really is still pretty much a baby dog. Especially the boys. It takes a long time for their brain to mature, and it takes a lot of training in a lot of different places for them to understand that "sit" means "sit" in every place. That's how a dog's brain works - they don't "generalize" well. That means if you teach them "sit" in the kitchen, they understand that when you say sit, or you make a certain hand gesture, it means they should sit right there. But then it takes them a while to understand that it ALSO means they should do it in the living room, and outside in the backyard, and at the park, and everywhere....their brains don't work like ours do. They have to almost re-learn the same thing in a lot of places before they really, truly learn it.

The link that melbrod gave you for the "practicing relaxation" is great!
 

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Hey -- Hey - Hey there MEADOWCAT !!! AND I quote : One thing that is really helpful is to keep in mind that even though his body is getting pretty "adult" sized...he really is still pretty much a baby dog. Especially the boys. It takes a long time for their brain to mature

SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO MC ------ Your saying us guys are -- are Slower ???? Than you Gals ??

Gee Wizz ! lmao

Well , I never noticed any deference - But then again -- I'm a Slower BOY - still lmao

Good post
 

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Von Drax
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Discussion Starter #20
LOL Mel ! -- I guess ------ Drum roll here please ----- Great minds think alike :grin2::grin2::grin2::grin2::grin2::grin2:

As we posted about the same video - at about the same time :grin2::grin2:


WELL!!! So far so good! He laid down next to me right away.. im at my desk and he did try to push me a couple times to get under my arms but i held them down and didnt let him in. After that he gave up and laid down. BUT NOW he's starting to whine. i gave him a treat for laying down but maybe it was too soon. So now no treats, right? until he stops or the 30 minutes have passed?

hes currently up again and whining in my face and kicking my legs under my chair. guess i spoke too soon *sigh*

will update in a few hours i guess lol
 
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