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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
in about 2 weeks I will be bringing home my little boy diesel who probably won't be so little anymore. He'll be 9 weeks old and I want to make sure I do everything right.

First off where is the best place to take a puppy for training? It's been 9 years since I've had a puppy so I'm a little rusty :) I live in VA if that helps

What are some bad habits I should try to avoid with him while he's young so he won't do it when he's older?

What kind of collar should I use for him to stop him from pulling?

When it comes to small animals and children should I socialize him around them early so it isn't a problem when he's older?

I've read that they whine a lot. Is there a reason for that? Is there anything I can do to help that not become a problem? I'm a sucker when a dog starts whining :(

Does anyone have any good advice of things I should do right away to avoid problems when he's older?

Thanks in advanced!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
also I want him to be crate trained but I also want him to sleep with me so how do I go about doing that so he doesn't whine in his crate during the day when we're not home.
 

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u mad?
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in about 2 weeks I will be bringing home my little boy diesel who probably won't be so little anymore. He'll be 9 weeks old and I want to make sure I do everything right.

First off where is the best place to take a puppy for training? It's been 9 years since I've had a puppy so I'm a little rusty :) I live in VA if that helps
I'm not in VA so I can't name specific places. Find a club or place that offers classes and look into the trainers there. Find somebody who uses positive reinforcement methods and has lots of experience in training.

What are some bad habits I should try to avoid with him while he's young so he won't do it when he's older?
He's small and cute now, but if you don't want to deal with couch/bed hog when he's older then don't let him do it while he's younger. I also was really glad that I taught him patience (to wait) early on as I'm sure it's helped with a bunch of issues (bolting out of the car or house, for instance).

What kind of collar should I use for him to stop him from pulling?
If you start heeling training as soon as you start taking him for walks you shouldn't need any special collars.

When it comes to small animals and children should I socialize him around them early so it isn't a problem when he's older?
I'm one of those "socializing is something that should happen throughout a dog's whole life" people. As soon as he has all of his shots take him everywhere to see everything and meet everyone.

I've read that they whine a lot. Is there a reason for that? Is there anything I can do to help that not become a problem? I'm a sucker when a dog starts whining :(
Don't give in to the whining!

Does anyone have any good advice of things I should do right away to avoid problems when he's older?
Be patient and persistent in training. If you say, "oh just this once..." about something it will likely make training whatever that habit is out of him more difficult.

Thanks in advanced!
I hope that helps a little. Hopefully others will say more.
 

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First of all, welcome from VA. We are going to have a meet next weekend for some of the VA Doberman members. Feel free to join us if you want to be around some other Dobermans, and Dobie people. Depending on your location, here is the link http://www.dobermantalk.com/southeast-us-region/62275-calling-all-va-members.html

As far as the questions. I used the prong collar for TRAINING only. Refocusing the dogs attention onto me. Using treats and such can help with leash training as well.

Small animals and children, take him EVERYWHERE!! Pet stores, when you run into 711.. etc. It helps with socialization, and his "people skills." If you have friends with smaller dogs, and kids, see if you can arrange a play date. Make sure to supervise (always), and give corrections if needed. The easiest way to prevent bad behaviors is to see them coming, and correct them BEFORE they become a bad behavior. Fixing it the first time is WAY easier than fixing it in a few years.

Don't into the whining, fight off the urge. Mine have their moments. The first time I started crate training my oldest.. you would have thought she was dying. She was screaming. She also did that the first time I took her to the dog park (LOL). The whining can be a protest, and you don't need to give into it and feel bad. Think of it as a child saying "I don't want too!" Most people don't think of it that way, they feel bad for the crying because its a dog.. but in the way your asking.. think about it like a child.

Enlisting in a training class will always be helpful. It is good for you, and the pup to not only learn, but build a bond through the training. These dogs are very smart, and learn very easily. Socialization and training is the key to a happy Doberman relationship.

Keep us posted, and best of luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the advice! I will see where you guys are meeting and try to make it there!

Did you guys start training right away? Our breeder told us to start as soon as we got him but then other people have told me to wait till their a few months to start training which I thought was odd.
 

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in about 2 weeks I will be bringing home my little boy diesel who probably won't be so little anymore. He'll be 9 weeks old and I want to make sure I do everything right.

First off where is the best place to take a puppy for training? It's been 9 years since I've had a puppy so I'm a little rusty :) I live in VA if that helps
If I were in an area where I didn't know where the good obedience trainers were I'd go to the AKC site and look for Obedience clubs in my area of the state.

What are some bad habits I should try to avoid with him while he's young so he won't do it when he's older?
Don't allow any behavior that you don't plan on allowing when he's an adult. Don't let him jump on you--get down to his level--he's trying to look in your face--that's what puppies do to their mothers to get their attention. If you don't want him on furniture as an adult don't let him on it now--ever! If you have rules about no dogs in the kitchen--keep him out of the kitchen now--don't fall for sad eyes and what you think are hurt feelings. If you don't want him to dig in the yard--go out with him and play ball or tug or something else that involves you and doesn't involve looking for moles in the lawn.

What kind of collar should I use for him to stop him from pulling?
I don't think it makes any difference what kind of collar you start out with--it's not the collar that is going to teach him not to pull--it's you. Go through some of the posts (use the search function) and look for how do I stop my dog from pulling me--or invest in one of the many good books on the subject of how to train puppies. I think there is a sticky on recommended books on training with brief reviews on one of the forums.

When it comes to small animals and children should I socialize him around them early so it isn't a problem when he's older?
Yes. Start early. Use some good sense about kids though and make sure that the kids are dog wise enough to know how puppies should be treated.

I've read that they whine a lot. Is there a reason for that? Is there anything I can do to help that not become a problem? I'm a sucker when a dog starts whining :(
Some Dobes (and some dogs) whine a lot--some don't. Seems to run in the family they come from. The best thing you can do is to NOT BE A SUCKER--the minute a dog figures out that whining will a)get your attention and b)get him what he wants (your attention) you'll never hear the end of it.

Does anyone have any good advice of things I should do right away to avoid problems when he's older?
See above--if you are going to have rules about what he can and can't do start from the first day--don't let him do things or have privileges because he's small and young and cute and looks so sad when you are sitting on the couch and he's not--get on the floor with him instead--he'll be just as happy with that solution. Don't take your eyes off him--keep him in your sight and in the same room--if necessary on leash. Forestalling problems before they happen beats trying to correct them after they happen. Don't use pee pad to housebreak him--even if you live at the South Pole. Teach him from the beginning that outside is where to pee and poop and if you have to go out and stand in the rain with him to make sure that's where he does these things--so be it. It'll pay off by shortening the entire house training process.

From your second post. If you want him to be crate trained then train him from the beginning--one of the easy ways to do this is by crating him at night beside your bed. Wait until he IS thoroughly crate trained and then if you want him to sleep with you you can allow that.

For the record I don't allow dogs on the bed. I learned my lesson with my first Dobe. Dobermans for all of their virtues have boney elbows and hocks and are unmitigated bed hogs--I have enough trouble with the cats pushing me out of bed so the dogs look sad but understand that the rule is that cats get to get on the furniture and the bed. Dogs have to sleep in their own beds in the bedroom with me--if the cat is on their bed they have to come and complain to the management (me)--and I will remove the cat.

Thanks in advanced![/QUOTE]
 

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There are so many points to cover hahaha, you would need a book for just puppy stage.
My best advise, keep reading and asking questions before your pup gets one step ahead of you.

Remember one of the best traits in a Dobe is their determination, so they will be determined about something and you have to be the Master of Determination, remaining constant and consistent.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
dobebug- That was VERY helpful! Thank you for that advice. I will definitely crate him in the beginning then and we'll take it from there. I agree with the puppy pad part too. I want my dog to know that outside is where you go potty NOT in the house. I will try to not give into the sad puppy eyes. You are right he will be happy if i'm sitting on the floor with him too. I just need to teach myself not to give into him!

Nubis's Dad- I do need to get a book haha I'm trying to find the perfect one. Guess I might be too picky. Thank you for the advice!
 

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Did you guys start training right away? Our breeder told us to start as soon as we got him but then other people have told me to wait till their a few months to start training which I thought was odd.
I start training puppies the minute they come through the door. In the first week I teach a sit, down and stand--the second week I start training a "stay" for each of the initial behaviors. Not pulling on leash starts the first day and continues for the dogs lifetime.

I don't do formal training (as in, for ring type Obedience) until they are older (but that means when they have all of their puppy shots). Since I show my dogs they all learn very early how to stack (that's why I teach a stand/stay so early), how to stay when a stranger goes over them and how to trot alongside me at a pace I choose.

But a whole lot of the training is just general good house manners. Like not pestering the family at dinner (I crate early on and have a place where they can lie and see us later when they understand that stay means stay). Like not getting into trash. Like not chasing the cats. That kind of thing is ongoing for their lifetime.

Good luck--sticking with the program and making early decisions about what you intend to allow your personal dog to do and not do will have a huge payoff in having a dog with impeccable behavior (well, at least most of the time.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I start training puppies the minute they come through the door. In the first week I teach a sit, down and stand--the second week I start training a "stay" for each of the initial behaviors. Not pulling on leash starts the first day and continues for the dogs lifetime.

I don't do formal training (as in, for ring type Obedience) until they are older (but that means when they have all of their puppy shots). Since I show my dogs they all learn very early how to stack (that's why I teach a stand/stay so early), how to stay when a stranger goes over them and how to trot alongside me at a pace I choose.

But a whole lot of the training is just general good house manners. Like not pestering the family at dinner (I crate early on and have a place where they can lie and see us later when they understand that stay means stay). Like not getting into trash. Like not chasing the cats. That kind of thing is ongoing for their lifetime.

Good luck--sticking with the program and making early decisions about what you intend to allow your personal dog to do and not do will have a huge payoff in having a dog with impeccable behavior (well, at least most of the time.)
That sounds like a great plan! What way did you use to train your puppy when you brought them home? My breeder said Dobermans like to be rewarded with toys more then treats. Do you agree or is there a better way to do it? I want to make it exciting for him so he'll want to learn and won't get bored with it.
 

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Please check out the VA meet up! Where are you in Virginia? I have a few clubs/centers to recommend. I started Juno right away with sit and watch me. She is also crate trained(ing?) But since my yorkie died she's been sleeping with me. Crate during the day. I let Juno scream and scream when we started crate training. Eventually she would go to sleep, same as during the day;only let him out when he's silent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Please check out the VA meet up! Where are you in Virginia? I have a few clubs/centers to recommend. I started Juno right away with sit and watch me. She is also crate trained(ing?) But since my yorkie died she's been sleeping with me. Crate during the day. I let Juno scream and scream when we started crate training. Eventually she would go to sleep, same as during the day;only let him out when he's silent.
I am in Northern VA close to the Dulles Airport! Did you only crate train during the day or at night too? What do you keep in the crate with her to make her feel like her crate is a good place to be. I used to have a husky and he loved his crate! I want Diesel to have the same kind of experience. It's going to break my heart hearing him cry but I know I just have to stick it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Also I should've mentioned this earlier does anyone have any good advice on posting ears. The breeder told me that him and I will do it together when I pick up Diesel and hopefully that will make me feel more comfortable but I don't want to mess this up so I'm kind of nervous about it.
 

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One of the very first things I train is to NEVER walk through the doors/gates until I give a release to do so. And I don't use a verbal command; the rule is, if the door is open, your paws cannot pass the door guard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
One of the very first things I train is to NEVER walk through the doors/gates until I give a release to do so. And I don't use a verbal command; the rule is, if the door is open, your paws cannot pass the door guard.
I love that! I have a friend whose dog is not allowed to walk through doors or go up or down the stairs before she says so and I absolutely love it so I want to do that as well.
 

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I'm about 1.5 hours away. :) there are tutorials here for posting ears, and if you're interested in Schutzhund my club is near Charlottesville. I can help you post there and you can see the dogs work. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I would love that! I saw some of the tutorials so I will be printing them out and using them. I think I'll just have to practice a lot :) I would love to come see the dogs in action. Let me know where it is located and maybe after I get Diesel we can come check it out and work on the posting. Thanks so much for your help.
 

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Try getting in touch with a local Dobermann Club. See if they have any ideas on a training class. Somethings to ask the trainer is how long has he has been training. What certifications does he have. Has he trained Dobermanns. The most important thing when you do find a training class. Go watch some training classes without your dog. Training class will show you how to train your dog. You just don't train that day when you go to class. Training is every day in you and your dogs life. It is being CONSISTENT with the training and if there is more than one person in your household. Everyone is involved in the training and CONSISTENT with training. You will hear Nothing In Life Is Free (NILIF) training. You can start to use his dog food to train with.
I would not use a choker collar on that young of dog. Use a flat collar.
For one thing your breeder should already be socializing him and you should continue as soon as you get him.
House breaking get a crate. You can get a larger crate but you must partition it off. The puppy should only have enough room to sit, lay down, and turn around. Then you can move the partition as he is growing. Let him get use to it. Leave the door open, throw some food it it, put a toy in it. Let him check it out and go in on his own. It should be a happy fun safe place. He will start to wine (yes Im thinking of drinking right now)LOL to get out. Do not give in. Do not give in. We always fed our boys in their crates. We have them do a down. We fix their meal. Then I say bed. They have a race too see who can be the first one in their crate!
Must be taken outside as soon as he is taken out of crate, after drinking water or eating. I would even take them out every 30 min. A rule of thumb a puppy should hold their urine for about 1 hr for every month old they are. When he does go potty make it a fun and exciting thing and give him a treat 1-2 seconds after he does potty, or sit, down. Longer than that he just thinks you gave him a treat because you wanted to give him a treat. Some people use a marker word (like saying the word "YES" then treat or use a clicker then treat). Then you would have to remember to have your clicker with you all the time. As he is geting older you can start to ween him off of treating every time. Maybe every other time. If you see him having a mistake. Don't yell at him. Take him outside right then. If you find a mess. Don't yell at him. Dogs live in the NOW. You do not give them a correction 5 seconds after they did something wrong. Your timing of the correction is important. Make sure you clean up the area with an enzyme cleaner.
I would not be giving him lots and lots of exercise like running and long walks as a puppy. As he is getting older remember a tired dog is a good dog.
I'm tired! Im going to have that whine I mean wine!
Good luck.
 

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What I did when I first brought my puppy home was get him used to being in the crate without closing the door, I made it a positive experience. His crate was next to our bed and when he would whine I put my hand next to him to let him know I was there and he went back to sleep. I put pee pads in the room so he could come out and use them if he needed to and he did. This was only for nighttime and it didn't seem to slow down potty training for My Diesel, he preferred to go outside and it didn't take him long to start letting us know when he wanted out. Of course, this may not work for everyone but it helped us get more sleep, we did keep our bedroom door closed and had the room puppy proofed.
 

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I
But a whole lot of the training is just general good house manners. Like not pestering the family at dinner .
We have done this with our dogs too and it is so nice once the work is done. We have the command "out of the kitchen". The dogs lay down on the carpet in the living room and are not allowed to come in until we get up from the table and tell them okay. With a puppy, it is a lot of work initially, a lot of getting up while eating and putting them back in a down, but it is worth it!
 
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