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haha I absolutely LOVE the fact that he chases the laser pointer, and that he chases the tennis ball. I thought for a while that he wasn't going to be interested in fetching.

Odin Videos :: VIDEO0004.mp4 video by starryeyedsuprised - Photobucket

So if anyone is following my posts, I last posted that Odin was uninterested in his food. Well turns out nothing major was wrong, he was just being a turd. He is eating but not as much as he used to.

Odin is turning into a little man dog >_< dogs are more interested in is pee now when he marks when they used to pay no attention to it before. He isn't giving me any problems yet, if anything he probably listens to me more. I have since day one given him a structured environment and set boundaries.

He sometimes tries to see if he can get away with something but I am always there to re direct him. Today we left him home alone out of his crate for about and hour in a half and he did awesome. Came home to the house the way we left it.

Odin get TONS of compliments on how handsome he is and how wonderful his personality is. I take him to work but leave him in the car so that during my breaks I can go out in the back and play fetch with him. When it starts to get hot my boss said that there is a spare room we can keep him in if I wanted so that will be neat. Either that I will just leave him home and get a good workout when I get home at the end of the day.

his recent trick is "bow" and we are working on heal off leash at the moment.

 

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I'd stop with the laser pointer. You'll end up with a neurotic dog that chases glints of light and is always looking for the red dot everywhere, IMO its just not good for them.

Handsome boy though! He looks so proud standing on that A frame :)
 

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Handsome boy!!
 
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He's looking great!

Have to agree about the laser pointer, though.
 

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Man he is growing into himself. He is starting to look like a real stud!

Unfortunately I only have one dog that will chase laser pointers and that's Rocco. My Doberman's kind of look at it like ''really?''
 

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I'd stop with the laser pointer. You'll end up with a neurotic dog that chases glints of light and is always looking for the red dot everywhere, IMO its just not good for them.

Handsome boy though! He looks so proud standing on that A frame :)
I'd second that veto on the laser pointer. Some friends played with their show kitties with a laser pointer and their Dobe bitch started to try to catch it. They thought it was cute so they played with her with the laser as well--when they started to train for her CD they discovered that they could not get and hold her attention because she was always looking for moving light flashes. They had a very good trainer work with her trying to fade out that behavior and after several months the trainer said that if they let her go a few years without EVER playing with the laser pointer again they might try training for her CD again. Ultimately she got her CD at nearly 9.

But they really lived to regret the whole laser.
 

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I'd stop with the laser pointer. You'll end up with a neurotic dog that chases glints of light and is always looking for the red dot everywhere, IMO its just not good for them.

Handsome boy though! He looks so proud standing on that A frame :)
I've heard this before, but isn't this like anything else we do with our dogs? I've always been curious about this, since I've seen it posted a few times. If you have a way to start/stop, is it really that bad? (these next are assuming a well trained dog) If you play tug, a dog doesn't try to take everything out of your hands, or if you do bitework, a dog doesn't bite everybody... Why would a dog chasing a laser pointer be different? I "rumble" with my dog, but she wouldn't ever play that rough without me asking if she wanted to rumble first... We can teach our dogs to play fetch, but at the same time teach them to disregard that same toy on command.

I've never used a laser pointer, and I'm not saying that it's true or false, just genuinely curious here. Why would a dog obsess over a laser light, but not everything else? Is this a matter of impropper usage/training, or does it have something to do with the light itself?
 

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I've heard this before, but isn't this like anything else we do with our dogs? I've always been curious about this, since I've seen it posted a few times. If you have a way to start/stop, is it really that bad? (these next are assuming a well trained dog) If you play tug, a dog doesn't try to take everything out of your hands, or if you do bitework, a dog doesn't bite everybody... Why would a dog chasing a laser pointer be different? I "rumble" with my dog, but she wouldn't ever play that rough without me asking if she wanted to rumble first... We can teach our dogs to play fetch, but at the same time teach them to disregard that same toy on command.

I've never used a laser pointer, and I'm not saying that it's true or false, just genuinely curious here. Why would a dog obsess over a laser light, but not everything else? Is this a matter of impropper usage/training, or does it have something to do with the light itself?
Google OCD laser or light chasing with dogs and you'll see just how bad it is. The problem is you have no idea IF your dog will get that bad UNTIl he/she does get that bad. It is a TRUE OCD condition and they know very little about how to stop it once it starts. This not NOT like anything else we do at all. It has nothing to do with training. It's an obsession, a compulsion. The dog can't help itself.

ETA - it's any light or reflection the dog then starts chasing to the point of not being able to do ANYTHING ELSE. It's not just the laser dot that sets them off.
 

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Google OCD laser or light chasing with dogs and you'll see just how bad it is. The problem is you have no idea IF your dog will get that bad UNTIl he/she does get that bad. It is a TRUE OCD condition and they know very little about how to stop it once it starts. This not NOT like anything else we do at all. It has nothing to do with training. It's an obsession, a compulsion. The dog can't help itself.

ETA - it's any light or reflection the dog then starts chasing to the point of not being able to do ANYTHING ELSE. It's not just the laser dot that sets them off.
but why is it so different? Why doesn't this happen with other toys? This is something I was able to find, seems interesting:

The only stimulus occurs through the animal's vision. No scent, sound or taste. This is both very, very compelling for the animal as well as potentially mind-blowing. Most prey objects do not behave that way; they have a physical presence.

This brings about the second issue: no reward. No matter how hard your dog or cat tries, it cannot catch the dot. Very frustrating.

Both of these issues can mess with your pet's head if you overdo it. In the first case, its natural prey drive is rewired to respond to just visual stimuli. In the second case, it is learning that there is no satisfaction in this process.


I have never really put much thought into this, but again, it's not something I've ever done either. Just never understood why this happens. I guess it makes sense that light is one of the only things that a dog can never "catch", and we teach our dogs specifically to "catch" the items we play with? So a drivey, determined dog wants to catch the light, which is impossible? Now that I'm thinking about it, if I dangled a tug rope in front of my dog for hours, but never let her get it, she would probably go nuts too.
 

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You have really good points, but I have no answers :) It's VERY common in my Vizsla breed though so I'm overly cautious. I've seen a few dogs that were horrible to try to live with. ALL they did inside or outside was look for reflections.
 
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You have really good points, but I have no answers :) It's VERY common in my Vizsla breed though so I'm overly cautious. I've seen a few dogs that were horrible to try to live with. ALL they did inside or outside was look for reflections.


Odin is very handsome. I do know of an IDR + that is severely OCD on the laser/reflections it is not fun to manage or live with.
 

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Before I knew the OCD light with dogs I tried the laser with Chase. I could not, for the life of me, get him interested in it AT ALL. Later on in the months, I take back the disappointment I felt when he didnt chase after it, because I found out he is exceptionally good working with heavy distractions :D

Odin is getting more and more handsome as he grows, cant wait to see what he will look like when he fully matures :)
 

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I hear you guys about the ocd light thing, Odin does good with the leave it command. I put the light in a certain spot and he looks at it and I say leave it, he will stay put and when he takes his eyes off of it and looks somewhere else, not for light just redirects his attention then I tell him good boy and to go get it.

I do that with the ball as well so that he doesn't become ball obsessed as well. He is doing really well with listing to me. When we are at the dog park and a dog comes in and all the dogs are going up to the gate I call Odin to me and we walk to the other end of the park to give the other dog a chance to get it without being overwhelmed.

If he is trying to chase after something I tell him ah ah ah and to come here and he does. Also when his play is starting to get to rough I tell him to stop playing and to come to me. So I think we are doing pretty good with self control, if an obsession is beginning I want to address it, not ignore it.
 

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I hear you guys about the ocd light thing, Odin does good with the leave it command. I put the light in a certain spot and he looks at it and I say leave it, he will stay put and when he takes his eyes off of it and looks somewhere else, not for light just redirects his attention then I tell him good boy and to go get it.

I do that with the ball as well so that he doesn't become ball obsessed as well. He is doing really well with listing to me. When we are at the dog park and a dog comes in and all the dogs are going up to the gate I call Odin to me and we walk to the other end of the park to give the other dog a chance to get it without being overwhelmed.

If he is trying to chase after something I tell him ah ah ah and to come here and he does. Also when his play is starting to get to rough I tell him to stop playing and to come to me. So I think we are doing pretty good with self control, if an obsession is beginning I want to address it, not ignore it.
I think this is a good idea, in terms of leave it, but I would suggest using a different word, I prefer to use "wait". The reason being, "leave it" should mean NEVER... TO put it more simply, if you tell a dog to "leave it', and the dog then gets released to do xxxx, your in essence teaching your dog that eventually he will be allowed to do xxxxx. As opposed to "wait", or something similar, where you are just teaching patience. This way you don't have to ever worry about your dog breaking a leave it command.

A more specific example, if we're playing fetch, I may say "wait", toss a toy, then say "ok" which is the release command to go chase the toy. If I say "leave it", I expect her to not chase the toy, even after release. Nitpicking, but comes in handy down the road.
 

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I think this is a good idea, in terms of leave it, but I would suggest using a different word, I prefer to use "wait". The reason being, "leave it" should mean NEVER... TO put it more simply, if you tell a dog to "leave it', and the dog then gets released to do xxxx, your in essence teaching your dog that eventually he will be allowed to do xxxxx. As opposed to "wait", or something similar, where you are just teaching patience. This way you don't have to ever worry about your dog breaking a leave it command.

A more specific example, if we're playing fetch, I may say "wait", toss a toy, then say "ok" which is the release command to go chase the toy. If I say "leave it", I expect her to not chase the toy, even after release. Nitpicking, but comes in handy down the road.
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Good point, I guess I was use the word leave it for when he cant have it at all, so that I can get him to look away and not focus on it. I'll use the word wait while he is still focused on and then give him the release word to go after it.
 

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He is growing into a handsome young man. I have to agree I would not play with a laser pointer with any of my dogs. Glad he is liking fetch. That is something I really wanted Kyrah to do and we still work on it. Lately she has been doing it a bit more. So I still have hope! :)
 

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Torque likes to chase laser pointers too! I don't do it very often. I actually can't remember the last time I had it out for him now that I think about it... But he started to figure out that the light was coming from the little silver thing in my hand and would chase the light for a little while then try to get the pointer out of my hand. Too smart... haha
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I respect your guys point of view, but I feel like if I avoid the laser pointer and not address the issue if he becomes obsessed then I feel like I am doing him no good. Right now he has self control and listens to me if he is not allowed to go after it and he will go off and do something else while I still have it pointed at a certain point on the floor. We have a computer that has a red light that imitates the laser pointer and Odin has never attempted to go after it. I never want my dogs to become obsessed with anything so if I start to see signs that he might be with something I address it right away.
 
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