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Hello!

This weekend I officially am going to join the dobe family! I plan on bringing home a 4-5 month old male. The breeder is a 6 hour drive away so I'm calling on your guys help for the best method to make him feel as calm as possible on the ride back.

Me and 3 people (family/sig. other) will be driving there the night before staying at a hotel and then visiting the following morning. My current plan is to meet him, play, and try to get him tired out so he doesn't have much energy for the ride back. I plan to let someone else drive back while I sit with him in the back. I was also thinking that I could place him in a crate for the ride since he is crate trained(stop every 1.5 - 2 hours).

Do you guys have any any advice, do's, and don'ts. Are there must bring items? I currently plan on bringing a couple of toys, and treats.

Hopefully all goes well and I can post some pictures this weekend.
 

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Got mutt?
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Must have item number one: a crate. That is the safest travel method. Keeps them from jumping around, getting in the way, and being a safety hazard, and in case of an accident keeps them from being thrown around. Even though my adult dogs travel in harnesses because of space constraints, my puppies are crated.

After that, a collar with a tag printed with your information (a cheap pet store one will do) as well as a leash with a collar that he can't slip out of (martingales are great), poop bags, cleaning supplies, and fresh towels for the crate in case of a pee/poop/puke accident. Either use bottled water or get some of the water he's been drinking at the breeder's to avoid any possible upsets from an abrupt change (not all dogs are bothered, but why chance it?).
 

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Just bring a crate and put him in it with some bedding and a chew toy. He may complain for the first 20 miles if he is not completely crate broken, but then he will sleep the rest of the trip. One caution. He will sleep as long as you are driving. If you stop to get gas, eat, use the restroom yourself, whatever, he will wake up and you should take him out on a leash and give him a chance to pee.
 

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I picked up little girl on July 12th - Breeder put her in her crate - And I headed home - Just like Kans said - the first 20 minutes she was crying then she took a nap , all the way home . Little puppies sleep a lot .

Great advice from the above posters

Good luck ! and congrats on your new bundle of joy coming to her forever home
 

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I'd definitely do a crate. Don't be surprised if he gets car sick - pretty common with puppies.
Yes, 100% pack cleaning supplies!

Richter puked after going through the horrible stop and go traffic in Chicago. Poor dude...don't blame him. Only time he's ever been car sick.
 

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ZuriBug
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Water and water bowl. For sure travel crated. poop bags, collar and ID tags with your number on them. A note in your wallet saying you are traveling with a puppy in case there is an accident and you're separated.
 

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Hairy Dog, RIP Caesar, Katana, Kip, Capri
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Put phone number, maybe even address, of a contact person on the puppy crate, in your wallet, to the breeder, possibly on a collar tag if there's room for two numbers (yours and theirs)—make sure that person knows what is going on and can connect everyone together as needed if anything happens.

Cloth towels, paper towels and wet wipes.

____________________________________________________

My horror story of travel with a puking dog—

We (me driving, with my two young kids) were in totally backed-up, basically stopped traffic on the interstate going through Las Vegas (construction woes.) Picture three lanes solid with stopped cars, close to 100 degrees outside—I was already worried about the car overheating just sitting there with the air conditioner running.

And Katana threw up in the back seat right as the traffic coagulated completely.

In theory, we were "through" traffic (yeah sure), so we were in the far left lane with absolutely no way to get over to a far-right exit lane through the stopped traffic. So it was edge forward 10 feet, sit and wait, edge forward again—no one was willing to let another driver move over and get ahead of them. I gave up trying to get over and just stayed in the left lane hoping the traffic would shake loose and start going again soon. It didn't.

I think it took about an hour to drive 15 miles through town before we could get off the interstate, with two kids going "Ewwwwwww…." the whole time (too young and/or disgusted to do much other than throw a towel over the mess.) It was the only time Katana ever threw up in the car, but she certainly made it memorable enough to make up for that.
 

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Put phone number, maybe even address, of a contact person on the puppy crate, in your wallet, to the breeder, possibly on a collar tag if there's room for two numbers (yours and theirs)—make sure that person knows what is going on and can connect everyone together as needed if anything happens.

Cloth towels, paper towels and wet wipes.

____________________________________________________

My horror story of travel with a puking dog—

We (me driving, with my two young kids) were in totally backed-up, basically stopped traffic on the interstate going through Las Vegas (construction woes.) Picture three lanes solid with stopped cars, close to 100 degrees outside—I was already worried about the car overheating just sitting there with the air conditioner running.

And Katana threw up in the back seat right as the traffic coagulated completely.

In theory, we were "through" traffic (yeah sure), so we were in the far left lane with absolutely no way to get over to a far-right exit lane through the stopped traffic. So it was edge forward 10 feet, sit and wait, edge forward again—no one was willing to let another driver move over and get ahead of them. I gave up trying to get over and just stayed in the left lane hoping the traffic would shake loose and start going again soon. It didn't.

I think it took about an hour to drive 15 miles through town before we could get off the interstate, with two kids going "Ewwwwwww…." the whole time (too young and/or disgusted to do much other than throw a towel over the mess.) It was the only time Katana ever threw up in the car, but she certainly made it memorable enough to make up for that.
Ugh, I can just imagine!!

Many years ago when my kids were still young, I brought Louise home when she was 8 weeks old. We had done some stacking and picture taking at the breeders house before we left, and hotdogs had been involved. It was an hour drive home and I stopped at a neighbors house to pick up my kids - I was going to show them all the new puppy, but when I opened the back of my minivan the sight that greated me was so bad that I just closed it again - LOL!! Poor Louise was covered in vomit and stunk to high heavens. When we walked into our house, she went right into the kitchen sink for her first bath at our house! Louise ended up being a car sick dog her entire life. When I got my Ford Expedition, she used to ride in a crate right behind the drivers seat and I would cover the crate - that helped, but did not do away with her car sickness.
 
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