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Hi, We currently have a 7 month old Dobie Called Frank, he came from a breeder who only had one litter, he was loved and they were very sad when they let him go, i still send her videos and pictures now. He came to us knowing what a crate was and knew how to sit and do a wee wee. SO came along Fred, who by the way is only 9 weeks old. This is a different story (they always say you never get 2 kids the same! :) - He didn't know what a crate was which I understood as he had about 7/8 siblings whom he shared a large cage with, he pees where wants and poos also, he will start a poo outside and finish it indoors! - now that i can handle, my biggest problem is the sleep deprivation my husband and myself are currently going through! its like giving birth again yet I have no stitches or a pram!...:) In the evening, they lay around sleeping then at around 10pm we play with both Dobie's to tire them out...we put them in the crates at around 11pm, frank just goes in normally (the 7 month old) and the puppy 9 week one needs me to lay down with him or he will cry - the reason i do this as if he cries i think he will pee and poo his bed. We don't want the puppy in our room, so we want them sleeping in the utility. (by the way we also have an 8 year old French bulldog, but he doesn't interfere much, he's pretty damm lazy!

So the question I'm asking is what i am doing wrong???

Thanks x
 

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A few things to remember:
1 - You have TWO puppies in your house. This is a challenge, for multiple reasons. Things you need to research NOW are littermate syndrome and same sex aggression. Both of these are significant risks with this breed and with the ages of the puppies.
2 - You're expecting too much of the infant. That's precisely what Fred is - an infant. You should seriously consider tethering him to you any time he isn't crated to prevent accidents in the home. You need to take him out every half hour when he's awake, as well as immediately before and after any time spent in the crate, immediately before and after all meals, immediately after drinking, immediately before and after play.
3 - Yes, you should be waking up in the middle of the night to take him out for a little bit yet.
 

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I'm surprised a breeder would sell you a male puppy knowing you already have TWO other males. That is a huge red flag. Honestly, I would consider rehoming him. If you're lucky your other two males will get along when the older one hits maturity but the chances of 3 males getting along is almost zero.
 

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Hi Mum. Welcome from the Pacific NW.

I am going to reinforce what falnfenix just told you.

First, Fred sounds like a typical 9 week old Dobe pup who as just been removed from the only life he has ever known. That included piling together with his 7-8 siblings when he slept and pretty much going to the bathroom where and when he felt like it. I have owned a number of puppies and "sleep deprivation" is pretty much a given. Also, Frank was actually, IMO, an anomaly. My 7 year old was the same way. He slept though the entire night his first night home at 10 weeks. And, he was house broken almost immediately. That is the exception, not the rule

But more importantly, given the way you described your situation>>>> a mature small breed male, a 7 month old male Doberman, and a 9 week old male Doberman, there is a very good chance that your troubles are just beginning and may spiral completely out of control. There are 3 things at play here:

-Littermate Syndrome. Puppies, especially breeds like dobermans who form incredibly strong bonds should ideally be raised at minimum of 1 1/2 -2 years apart. I prefer 2-3 years apart. Puppies, that close in age, raised together, present a unique set of problems. At the very least it will double the effort you will need to raise 2 healthy and emotionally secure dogs.

-Same Sex Aggression. Dobermans are prone to SSA. If and when it shows up, your household will never be the same. I have managed 2 male Dobe households and it is not something that I would ever recommend to the average owner. Some have been fine. Some have been iffy and required strict oversight. And one in particular was complete hell.
Currently I have a 7 year old male and my son has a 9 month old male. They spend quite a bit of time together with me, pretty much because my son and daughter in law both work and they have 2 young children. We knew this going into him getting another pup. (This is my son's 3rd Dobe). That being said, I NEVER leave them alone. The pup is coming into his own and is already almost the same size as my mature male. A simple disagreement a this stage in their relationship could quite possible escalate into a physical altercation and ultimately could end up as a full blown fight. At that point, it could be a done deal. They would probably have to be separated for life. I have been there.

-Danger to the smaller dog. A smaller dog can be at risk if allowed to interact with a maturing Doberman and left together unsupervised. As the pup figures out and sets its boundaries, he may have a tendency to lash out at other dogs if, or when, they feel their boundaries are being pushed. What is meant to be a warning or simple admonishment to a sibling, or another large dog, can maim or even kill a smaller dog. It happens more than you might think. People just don't talk about it much.

In summary, and at the risk of sounding like an alarmist: I really don't think that the average dog owner could, or should, take on this situation. There is way too much possibility of failure. And, I'm talking about a messy, possibly catastrophic failure.

I would rehome the pup and concentrate on raising my 9 month old

Best to you and your dogs

John Lichtwardt
Portland OR

Edit to say: I just saw Gretchen Red's post. So... What she said also. Between the three of us who have posted here, there is a lot of experience with Dobermans. Please take these comments to heart and in the way they are intended. To save you from serious problems somewhere down the line.
 

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I agree with the above two comments - seriously consider returning Fred to the breeder, or finding a rescue to help you rehome him. You really, really need to consider the future safety of all three dogs...and yourselves, because you're almost asking for fights to happen, which can cause you harm when you try to break up a fight.
 
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