Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello, friends! I've been lurking for quite some time now, so I thought I'd say hello. I love this wonderful resource and have learned so much already, so thank you!

I don't have a doberman yet, but I'm looking forward to it. As seems to be rising in popularity (and I did read all those threads), I'm looking for a pup to eventually serve as my service dog. I've had dogs my whole life, but they were more “country rescues” – dogs usually either found needing help or dropped off on our farm because we take care of our critters and have no animal control or shelters in the area. Since I'm looking for a puppy, I started looking at breeders for the first time in my life. The first couple that I found pseudo-locally raised some serious red flags, and I realized I'd better research breeding and know what I'm getting into. That search led me to your forum!

I've learned quite a lot in the last month or so, although I think I may need help (and perhaps a bit of hand-holding) when it comes to choosing the right breeder and understanding pedigrees. I know there will likely be a wait list for a great connection, which is fine by me since I need time to save up a bit more than I'd initially banked on spending, a budget which includes supplies and medical insurance.

I would so very much like a red male, although color is not nearly as important as temperament and health/longevity. I'd really love to find a breeder who has experience with service dogs, either firsthand or bred in their lines, but anyone willing to do thoughtful breeding and temperament testing is great. As mentioned, I'm pretty rural, so it's likely a drive for me either way. I'd love to find someone within a 6 hr drive or so, since I do have a homestead (livestock) and a one-vehicle family. I live in Southeast Missouri, so I can feasibly travel to areas of Arkansas, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, and maybe Kansas (Kansas City/eastern side, anyway). A dog with a low prey drive is preferable, both for service dog work and because I homestead.

I plan to do most of the training myself, though I've found both CGC and service dog trainers within an hour or two of me for proper classes. I do have quite a bit of experience with working breeds, mostly border collies and pit bulls, and to a lesser extent GSDs, rottweilers, mastiffs, and huskies. I have three girls who've never experienced a home without dogs, but my doberman will indeed be -mine- and be with me almost always, and crated when not. We do have several other dogs, but they're outside farm dogs/country rescues. We do have a section of yard fenced off for them, but my new pup will be our first inside dog (and my first dog at all) since the death of my doggie soul mate, Achaiah, 4.5 yrs ago. I finally feel like I'm ready for another dog of my own, and I've learned that a service dog would be very beneficial to me since I'm struggling with my health quite a bit more in recent years.

The doberman pinscher stood out to me during all of my research. I read up on service dogs as well as the top long-distance hiking breeds. As a dog lover, that still left me with a list of about 12-15 breeds, so I narrowed it further by deciding to try a brand-new-to-me breed and looking at highly intelligent and loyal dogs with short, easily-maintained coats. Everywhere I looked, I saw doberman!

I used to hike quite a lot in my childhood and early twenties, but I haven't done it purposefully in many years. I've started doing so again recently for my health, and it has revived my life-long dreams of one day hiking the Appalachian Trail and the American Discovery Trail. I've recently learned that we live right off the Ozark Trail, so that is my current goal. I wouldn't attempt a thru-hike until pup is 2yrs+. I do have 40 acres of my own, plus we're nestled up against the Mark Twain National Forest, so we definitely do a lot of walking/hiking/water hole fun, plus I hope to one day learn to hunt. A dog that might have interest in tracking or nosework would be fun. Achaiah enjoyed obstacle courses, though we never did any proper sports, but I thought something like agility or obedience might be fun as well.

I also started looking into dogs' nutrition a bit more after Achaiah died. We had twelve wonderful years together, but I felt we should have had a few more. I got her when I was young and on my own for the first time. We ended up homeless when she was about a year old, and I struggled for many years. She'd been pampered at first, but both of us lived off the cheapest whatever for many years. I at least upgraded our kibble after learning more, though the best option I can find 'locally' (still an hour away) is Rachel Ray Nutrish. I've read a lot more about dog food since finding this forum, and I made the slightly longer drive to the nearest petco to price better dog foods. My ultimate goal, however, is to switch to a raw diet and provide most of their meals from meat raised here on the Stead. We're a ways off from self-sufficiency, and we've had a few set-backs this year, but that's what I'm working toward. Not solely, because pup needs to be able to eat decent trail-foods, but that's my primary goal.

This little nutshell got way bigger than I meant, so guess that's it for now. Thanks again! I know you all like pics, so I'll include a few of Achaiah. She was a pit bull/border collie mix and had the best traits of each.





Her favorite trick:


I lost the 'I don't dress my dogs' war to Achaiah and her bandana fetish. Nothing made her happier than a fresh ball or fresh bandana! I gave her both at one time once...that was an exciting 36 hrs:


Retired fat & happy on the farm, just like her human:
 

·
Always Grateful
Joined
·
6,952 Posts
Nice introduction and love the photos. I will say that a few things stood out for me. One is that same sex aggression is very prevalent in this breed. Your "several other dogs" could definitely cause a challenging situation because of that. Two, you want a low prey-drive. Every Doberman I've known was pretty high prey-drive. This is a very challenging breed to raise up as a balanced adult. They require sooooooo much time and energy for the first few years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Hello, and thank you for your responses! Yes, I guess I should have said 'lower prey drive', ha ha. I've read that some lines (European, Schutzhund) have more than others. I've been doing tons of research, so I do think I understand their needs. I plan to do loads of training & exercise to keep him happy, healthy, and hopefully as non-destructive as possible.

We do have a handful of dogs, but those are outside farm dogs and this will be an inside companion. My dogs have usually been inside dogs until we moved here 6.5 yrs ago & became the local 'drop off shelter'. I'll take as many as we can safely care for around our kids & critters, as feral dogs or just killing them is scarily prevalent around here, but they can't all fit in my house. The only one who ever comes in, a female min-pin, actually enjoys houses and knows how to behave in them. The rest are happy outside dogs and enjoy staying together. I was hoping SSA wouldn't be an issue if they live separately (and I *will* be on top of all training as well). After all of my reading -- and pining -- I really do have my heart set on a doberman this time around! I do feel like it's the perfect fit for what I both want and need and that I can provide a safe and happy home for one.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top