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Good morning all as it is 12:30am here I am constantly on the hunt for Doberman information. I’d like to start off by introducing myself to the group as a newbie to the wide world of Dobermans. For the past 3 months I have been in and out of countless pages of the Internet researching everything from bloodlines, health conditions, trainings and everything in between. As well as looking into what it would take to one day acquire our very own family Doberman. I have a Fiancé that is just as eager as I am to find the right “fit” for us and the 4 kids that we have living with us. That being said when I started this journey I had no idea the time it would take to narrow down what we wanted. Not as simple as walking into your local pet shop and pointing. then once that was done actually finding the right breeder to fit our needs. Needless to say 3 months into it and sometimes I feel like we are no closer than the day we started. I have come to these forums for a little bit of guidance and possibly someone to steer us in the right direction. To give a better idea of what we are looking for is firstly our new pup has to be family oriented. As I said before we have a large family and socializing is key. We frequent family gatherings and everyone in the family has their own pet that joins the party. American bull terrier, border collie, and lab. So getting along with other people and animals is important to keeping that family bond. Second, health is a big concern for us as well. What good is the most beautiful Doberman in the world if It had health conditions at age 3 and passes away. This is a future family member, not a work slave for us so health testing and temperament are high qualities. As far as looks go we both like the slightly bigger bulk that might come with the Euro lines. We realize that a true “euro” line comes with both parents being true European in breeding as well as having had some certs in areas such as IPO. So to keep it easy we are looking for the “look” of European not a true Euro. The smaller slender show dogs don’t really appeal to us as much. I would love a dog that has a drive because I was once a border collie owner and we did sport frisbee type of activities and took him on my outings of playing disc golf. Loved the obedience side of the training as well. So family/mildly active working “euro” bloodline is what we are after. The more I look into trainings the more fun I think it would be to get into tracking, dock diving, etc...We always want the option to be there one day that could allow us to breed our own line for others to enjoy so Full registration is a must. If we decide not to breed then we shall have it fixed and be a living part of our family for life. We are looking for a female to start and while not of the highest priority, we are looking for red to be the preferable color. I along with my fiancé have searched for months now like I said and have not really come up with any candidates within our own state of Louisiana that give us that warm fuzzy feeling to say ok, you’re our breeder. So we started looking out in neighboring states like Texas Arkansas and Mississippi. We’ve had better luck, however nothing that really popped out. I’m sure there are some out there that are just harder to find but without the connections we continue to hit dead ends. We are now considering reaching out even further and making a road trip to make the pickup if need be and being just another excuse to have a family outing on the road possibly seeing new places. We have come across a hand full of scammers already which is really quite sad but hey, it’s the world we live in I guess. I trust that a community forum like this would weed them out and I’m looking for anyone that might give us some help with finding our future pup. I think we now realize that the pup hunt adventure we began will be longer than anticipated and being picky is just part of the process. Because after all the good of the breed is what’s important in the end. So again, thanks for taking the time to read this post and any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Welcome to the forum!

So...I understand that you're attracted to the Doberman, but I want you to give some thought to whether a Doberman will truly fit your needs.

The first thing on your list is a dog that will "get along" with a big group of family and friends, including all their pets. While Dobermans can be social, as a breed, they aren't generally a "get along with all other dogs" type of breed. If you are getting together in groups where everyone brings their dogs, I might give some hard thought as to whether a Doberman is actually a good fit for you. *Some* of them are okay with that, but many of them are really not. They can be very particular about which other dogs they like.

They are definitely an active dog, and would enjoy sports like dock diving, tracking, etc. They are not couch potatoes!

I also see that you mention breeding...do you have any background in that? A good breeder is going to want to form a relationship with you and mentor you. Typically, quality dogs are often sold on a co-ownership. Breeders want to make sure that dogs are bred thoughtfully and with purpose. They want to ensure that dogs are healthy, and matched with other dogs that have healthy pedigrees, appropriate health testing, and correct temperaments. Dogs should be paired to complement one another and improve the breed.
 

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You've been given great advice! You have a lot of good breeders in Texas. I'd first reach out to any one of the 4 DPCA affiliated chapter clubs (DPC of SA, Austin, Houston, Dallas) maybe you can get a referral or at least see what club events they have coming up where you could talk to knowledgeable doberman people and meet their dogs. Good luck!
 

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Welcome to DT!

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As far as looks go we both like the slightly bigger bulk that might come with the Euro lines. We realize that a true “euro” line comes with both parents being true European in breeding as well as having had some certs in areas such as IPO. So to keep it easy we are looking for the “look” of European not a true Euro. The smaller slender show dogs don’t really appeal to us as much.

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So family/mildly active working “euro” bloodline is what we are after.


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We always want the option to be there one day that could allow us to breed our own line for others to enjoy so Full registration is a must. If we decide not to breed then we shall have it fixed and be a living part of our family for life. We are looking for a female to start and while not of the highest priority, we are looking for red to be the preferable color.

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I've pulled out a few bits of your post to address.

First of all, European show line dogs and European working line dogs tend have quite different looks, with working line dogs being smaller and lighter in build than show line dogs.

Secondly, most working line dogs of any breed are quite intense, and may not be suitable as a family pet. Not saying that it's impossible, just that it can be a lot harder.

Lastly, it would be the rare good/reputable breeder who would outright sell you a bitch puppy show/performance/breeding prospect on full registration. Much more likely, the breeder would stay on as the co-owner, and have a contract drawn up stipulating the conditions that must be met before the bitch can be bred ("XYZ titles", passing health testing, possibly stud of breeder's choice).

If you really do have your heart set on a European line dog, then the United Doberman Club breeders list is a good place to start looking. A lot of them are incorporating European lines (some show, some working) into their breeding programs. https://uniteddobermanclub.com/udc-breeder-directory/
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I appreciate a lot of the insight and no we do not have any breeding experience. However I look at it as we have to start somewhere but learning where that starting point has been tough to figure out. I wish we would have someone that could mentor us but we have found that a helpful word of advice isn’t the easiest thing to come by. I understand that someone with a lot of experience might get annoyed or just brush off someone with little experience but I never expected to just be completely shut down like we have. I’ll be the first to admit that we have a lot to learn however with anything it takes time a dedication. We aren’t looking to be some BYB and looking solely for profits in some money making scheme. We first and foremost want a family companion with a goal of one day having some quality dobermans to share with our local community on a very small scale service. But if those cards never come to blossom then we still have a great breed and a wonderful experience with the dog that we spent our time learning about and growing a solid relationship with together.
 

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When you talk with breeders I think the best way to approach it would be to say that you are looking for a pet first and foremost, but are open to other things like competing in a sport or possibly showing the dog if it turns out. If you are interested in breeding dobermans then showing is a MUST and breeders need commitment NOT empty promises, so don't tell them something they want to hear just to get a puppy. Novice first time show homes sometimes don't work out and it is really a bummer for breeders, especially if they placed a nice puppy with the family. If you are not up for the commitment then you are not going to be breeding your dog. Sorry if this sounds rather frank but it's just the truth.
 

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I appreciate a lot of the insight and no we do not have any breeding experience. However I look at it as we have to start somewhere but learning where that starting point has been tough to figure out. I wish we would have someone that could mentor us but we have found that a helpful word of advice isn’t the easiest thing to come by. I understand that someone with a lot of experience might get annoyed or just brush off someone with little experience but I never expected to just be completely shut down like we have. I’ll be the first to admit that we have a lot to learn however with anything it takes time a dedication. We aren’t looking to be some BYB and looking solely for profits in some money making scheme. We first and foremost want a family companion with a goal of one day having some quality dobermans to share with our local community on a very small scale service. But if those cards never come to blossom then we still have a great breed and a wonderful experience with the dog that we spent our time learning about and growing a solid relationship with together.

They are a great breed IMO and do require as much attention as a toddler even at 5 years as boy Hoss.
Hoss is Euro and even at 5 years demands much of our attention. His prey drive is very high. Loves to chase, hide and seek, nosework. IMO he is part human and demands interactions. Definitely not a go lay down dog, busy, busy, and busier. They are big so in turn they play hard. Can easily knock a person down totally by accident just doing a zoomie event.
So if you and the kids (they will play a major role in good canine citizenship) are willing to dedicate your time then go for it.
The other dogs may run around at the family parties but IF a Doberman runs into someone by accident there could be casualties.
Dobers at young ages are very playful but it seems as they get older they might (not always) take things a little harder thus play much harder. They are determined to win, even when playing sometimes that can turn into a teenage squabble between dogs. Then the whole dog gang at the party has to put in their 2 cents. So be a good advocate for your dog by always being nearby/watching closely group activities. Even when you become quite confident in your dogs temperment, always be close.
If I could count the times I have heard someone say “he has never done that before “ . There is always the first time......
Dogs that are smaller, shoot you can just pick them up to break up an event.
But these pups have some muscle and are much bigger, also I have found society expects more out of them in the area of control. Even when the other dogs are at fault our fellow humans will expect more control from your dog. It’s like the biggest guy in the bar scenario. They get challenged more and they are expected to tolerate more due to their size.
IMO Just take it one step at a time by raising a great canine citizen.
That will take you a bit of time.
Later you will know if you are up to the other challenges mentioned.
You sound excited in your initial post so give this you’re best work and enjoy the rewards.
 

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I appreciate the encouraging words ladydi. We are very excited and have done lots of research on that portion of it. Knowing what we were getting ourselves into was the first step in deciding what breed our new addition to the home would be. I will be doing most of the training but also plan on sending her to obedience school as well at an early age. We fostered a pup for a couple days that had been thru the same course locally and was amazed as to what this dog knew. I had never seen a dog do obedience on hand signals alone, but this one knocked out about ten of them without a second thought. That boosted my excitement in getting a Doberman even more. I have had a border collie in the past and he was extremely driven. There was no play with that dog. Even something as simple as fetch you could see his brain turning and acting as if it was a job. I couldn’t sit down outside for 2 minutes and drink a cold one without him noticing and grabbing the first ball or frisbee around and plopping I’m on my lap. That was my cue that it was time to go to work dad lol. So with the Doberman I am even more set up with more of a play area and I’ve watched dog sporting shows on ESPN for as long as I can remember. I’m so excited to build a miniature agility course in my back yard to work with her. We do have some breeders in mind but I would love someone that has a lot of experience in looking at pedigrees and other information to possibly PM me so I can throw a couple of the breeders names out so maybe I could be given some advice towards eliminating bad breeders. It would be really helpful if you are familiar with the southern state breeders as well but that’s not a limiting factor as I’ve stated above previously that we are willing to travel. I would put some breeders names on here but I’d like to keep it private and not bad mouth anyone in public session.
 

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My first Doberman we got involved with a board and train as wre new to the breed.
In retro spect I never got the results I wanted from the board and train. As I look back I did not progress as a handler when someone else took possession of my dog for 2 weeks. That’s what you want to be is a good handler.The dog will serve you.This takes time to develop and locality.
You see, I resented my trainer and dog working perfectly together, yet my own dog would not respond to me. So then I opted to attend group classes of which we learned techniques and instructors would have some one on one time with you and your pup.
So most important is find a great instructor and work towards good citizenship awards. The rest will fall into place after all you have kids!!!
Anyway welcome to the breed :grin2:
 
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