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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I experimented with a few genres of music and songs to leave on while I'm gone for work and Chase is left in the house.

I see a difference in the furniture, blankets, toys, and his energy when I come home, if music is left on. The blankets are no longer 'groomed' or picked at by his small teeth, he only chooses one toy to play with, the cushions are not scattered on the floor, and he greets me with a calm, yet happy nub waggin way.

The best results I got was with one song, and I admit, if I have trouble sleeping, I play this song once and I'm out like a light.

Thought I'd share:

NMmMNyTwePY

It's a song made up by several therapists to help people with high blood pressure, or heart problems. It's deigned to slow breathing, reduce heart rate, and lower blood pressure.

More info can be read at the bottom of the video:

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=NMmMNyTwePY
 

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When Dad leaves the home...I make sure CNN is on.
I feel Amy likes to hear human voices...as she is trained to my voice, at an early age.
- Amy has been left unsupervised since 4.5 months young...TV always left on talk programming

Nice orchestrated rhythms BTW, thanks for sharing...just not my taste, in music.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When Dad leaves the home...I make sure CNN is on.
I feel Amy likes to hear human voices...as she is trained to my voice, at an early age.
- Amy has been left unsupervised since 4.5 months young...TV always left on talk programming

Nice orchestrated rhythms BTW, thanks for sharing...just not my taste, in music.
Technically it's not a song, it's sounds and rhythms scientifically altered to slow your heart rate, breathing, and lower blood pressure. Def not a song to dance to or sing along lol. It's so effective, people operating heavy machinery are asked NOT to listen to it.
 

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Like a Ninja
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Might be something to leave with the foster dogs, Thanks!!!!

I also try to remember to not leave "Break Stuff" by limp bizkit playing also :p:D
 

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The "Through a Dog's Ear" CDs work really well with my dogs. Very relaxing.
 

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joie de vivre
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I leave NPR on each day. It's mellow so it doesn't disturb them but it's just enough to drown out any outside noises that might get them worked up.

Funny side story - Tali is a talker. Extremely vocal. She whines, groans, moans, squeals, barks, coos, chatters, cries - EVERYTHING. I've never met a more vocal dog. It's something I find particularly endearing about her (and sometimes maddening when she squeals in the car because she realizes we're going somewhere fun).

Anyway, so a few weeks ago BF and I were cuddling on the sofa with the dogs and watching a movie. Tali was chewing a ball and talking to it (oh yeah, she talks to her toys too). She would chew the ball, set it down, talk to it, chew it some more, repeat... This can go on for extended periods of time. It's ridiculously funny and cute to witness.

So she sets her ball down and goes to talk to it and, I swear, she sang out this perfect NPR theme song chime! LOL LOL

BF & I both looked at her, mouths open and brows furrowed, as she continued to chatter on and then he said, "Oh my god! Tali just sang the NPR chime!" LOL So I'm not crazy - I have a witness. I am not the only person that heard it!

Maybe I'm reaching here but I have to wonder if maybe that sound isn't kind of planted somewhere in her head since she has 2-years of daily exposure to it? There are super smart birds that can vocalize noises to imitate human language. Dogs don't have the vocal capacity to literally speak back words to us, but they *know* words. Take this Border Collie featured on NOVA; she has been documented as knowing 1,000 words. (link to NOVA show: How Smart Are Dogs?)

So the capacity for dogs to understand and remember language is there even though the ability to reproduce those vocalizations is not. However, a songy-chime doesn't require complex linguistics. It's just a rhythmic vocalization with specific pitch. I have to wonder if maybe, MAYBE Tali was kind of throwing out a noise she's familiar with and physically capable of producing?

I know. Like I said, I'm reaching. :) But I can't help but wonder.
 

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I leave NPR on each day. It's mellow so it doesn't disturb them but it's just enough to drown out any outside noises that might get them worked up.

Funny side story - Tali is a talker. Extremely vocal. She whines, groans, moans, squeals, barks, coos, chatters, cries - EVERYTHING. I've never met a more vocal dog. It's something I find particularly endearing about her (and sometimes maddening when she squeals in the car because she realizes we're going somewhere fun).

Anyway, so a few weeks ago BF and I were cuddling on the sofa with the dogs and watching a movie. Tali was chewing a ball and talking to it (oh yeah, she talks to her toys too). She would chew the ball, set it down, talk to it, chew it some more, repeat... This can go one for extended periods of time. It's ridiculously funny and cute to witness.

So she sets her ball down and goes to talk to it and, I swear, she sang out this perfect NPR theme song chime! LOL LOL


BF & I both looked at her, mouths open and brows furrowed, as she continued to chatter on and then he said, "Oh my god! Tali just sang the NPR chime!" LOL So I'm not crazy - I have a witness. I am not the only person that heard it!

Maybe I'm reaching here but I have to wonder if maybe that sound isn't kind of planted somewhere in her head since she has 2-years of daily exposure to it? There are super smart birds that can vocalize noises to imitate human language. Dogs don't have the vocal capacity to literally speak back words to us, but they *know* words. Take this Border Collie featured on NOVA; she has been documented as knowing 1,000 words. (link to NOVA show: How Smart Are Dogs?)

So the capacity for dogs to understand and remember language is there even though the ability to reproduce those vocalizations is not. However, a songy-chime doesn't require complex linguistics. It's just a rhythmic vocalization with specific pitch. I just have to wonder if maybe, MAYBE Tali was kind of throwing out a noise she's familiar with and physically capable of producing?

I know. Like I said, I'm reaching. :) But I can't help but wonder.

brw1982

Priceless story of Tali.
I swear, she is 1/2 human...thku for the read...a most fine example of canine intelligence.

Decades ago
I heard cow farmers discovered, that a radio left on in the barn...yielded ~10 to 15% more milk production.
Just can't remember if it was country music (or other)...but truly, how could it not be !!
 
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