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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been pondering the idea of getting little Toro a partner. I've read that it is not a good idea until they are at least a year old. If I do, she will be a girl.

I don't think he has bad separation anxiety, but I do think he would be happier, especially while I'm at work.

Input?
 

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I would wait min. a year before adding another. Two years is a much better age to add another dog, esp. if it is a puppy. That way the resident dog is trained and you don't have double trouble on your hands. It depends a lot on the personality of both dogs too. But raising two puppies at once is usually not recommended.
 

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It really does help if your first dog is mentally mature enough and trained enough. That might be at 1 year or 2... depends on the dog and you. In the mean time what you can do is work on his doggy socializing skills. Have him hang out and play and interact on a regular basis with other dogs. The key thing is that you should know these dogs to reduce the risk of introducing your dog to an aggressive dog.

Also, don't get the second dog thinking the pup will keep Toro company while you're away. The dogs should not be left alone unsupervised, at least for the first year, two, or so. Again, it will depend on the dogs. For starters, you could be sacrificing house training progress by allowing both dogs free run of the house too early. Bigger issue would be the fact that at the age of about 1 or 2 years old, the dogs are comming into maturity and this is the prime time for possible dominance conflicts to arise. You don't want them to have the opportunity to get into a fight while you're not home and they're running around loose in the house.
 

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dobesanddragons said:
I would wait min. a year before adding another. Two years is a much better age to add another dog, esp. if it is a puppy. That way the resident dog is trained and you don't have double trouble on your hands. It depends a lot on the personality of both dogs too. But raising two puppies at once is usually not recommended.

I back this 100%, IMHO I'd wait until your boy is at least closer to 2 before bringing in another pooch. Lexus wasn't mature until she was closer to 2 mentally. And my other guys were older (4 and 6) before she came to live with us.
 

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I would agree. Max is 5 & we brought in 1 1/2 year old Mindy.

In Mindy's former house, she had to deal with an 8 year old boxer, a 9 month old mastiff, a 1 year old boxer & a 2 year old pit bull. She had issues in that house & only played with the 8 year old boxer, who definately ran the pack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok,

thanks for the tips. I should clarify, however, that if I do get another dog, it will not be a puppy - most likely a young adult, and also, probably not another Doberman.
 

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If you check my dogs ages you can see i always wait about the 2 year + mark that is what i feel it takes for the previous puppy to come of age,although you wouldn't believe it to see Tia puppy play with Mischa.
 

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Rebel73 said:
Ok,

thanks for the tips. I should clarify, however, that if I do get another dog, it will not be a puppy - most likely a young adult, and also, probably not another Doberman.

Still, Toro is your guy & it's his territory right now. If you had a young adult & wanted to bring Toro in, I'd say do it now. But the situation is reversed & I really think it needs to be a better experience for Toro then the new dog. Toro needs to know no love. food or anything is being taken from him, he's just getting a friend.

The best advice for me has been to not let anything lay around that they can fight over. Keep the toys picked up & monitor the food. Don't let the food sit out.

I'd also say when you 1st bring in the new dog, before you do anything, walk Toro & the new dog together. Not to sound like Ceasar Milan or anything but I firmly believe in that. A good walk does a few things. It gives them a chance to meet, but also they have something besides just the other dog to focus on. It also takes some of the energy out of them before an actual yard meeting & they will also be a little use to each other. I won't say it will solve or prevent an issue from happening, but it will make it easier, plus if the walk goes very well, then their 1st adventure together was a positive one.
 

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I like to space dogs about 2 to 3 years apart. That means that the puppy you have gets to grow up to be an adult and be trained and get a lot of individual attention before another dog comes along.

When the next dog arrives on the scene you then have a well mannered, well trained older dog who can and will teach things to the younger dog. And if you don't think puppies learn from the older dogs around them, think again!!!!!

All of the puppies that come through my house learn to sit, down, and stay from the older guys. LOL Whether I want them to or not.

Puppies take a lot of time and work--and as someone else already pointed out you are expecting rather too much if you think a second dog will provide companionship and entertainment for the first dog when you aren't there. They should not be left alone together especially if there isn't much age seperation--two young dogs can think of endless unfortunate things to do left to their own devices without owner supervision.
 

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dobebug said:
I like to space dogs about 2 to 3 years apart. That means that the puppy you have gets to grow up to be an adult and be trained and get a lot of individual attention before another dog comes along.

When the next dog arrives on the scene you then have a well mannered, well trained older dog who can and will teach things to the younger dog. And if you don't think puppies learn from the older dogs around them, think again!!!!!

All of the puppies that come through my house learn to sit, down, and stay from the older guys. LOL Whether I want them to or not.

Puppies take a lot of time and work--and as someone else already pointed out you are expecting rather too much if you think a second dog will provide companionship and entertainment for the first dog when you aren't there. They should not be left alone together especially if there isn't much age seperation--two young dogs can think of endless unfortunate things to do left to their own devices without owner supervision.
I think there's another good reason to keep about a 2-3 year age difference when adding another pet, although it's not something most people want to think about.

Losing a dog is always difficult..no matter how long they live, it's never long enough. But having a whole house full of geriatric dogs, and losing them in quick succession is really hard to cope with.
 

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"Losing a dog is always difficult..no matter how long they live, it's never long enough. But having a whole house full of geriatric dogs, and losing them in quick succession is really hard to cope with."

We've almost always had 2 dogs and I find 5-6 years is best for us. A puppy helps keep the older dog active and gives the younger dog an experienced dog to learn from. It also makes training easier as well. The younger dog takes it's cue from the older, more trained dog.

I could not imagine losing our dogs in quick succession either, one is hard enough.
 

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I agree--we see this at the vet clinic where I work (and I see it with friends and their dogs). This has been sort of bad year for the geriatric dogs and cats and one of our best clients lost an elderly dog (12-1/2) and two cats, (18) litter mates in a two month period--it was awful for them.

I've at least only had to deal with the quick succession business once--it was two cats--a 17 year old guy who'd been with me since he was 6 weeks old and less than three months later a much loved stray who I'd only had for 5 years and who was about 8 but was white and had endless health issues because of the number of recessives that go into white. It wasn't like I didn't anticipate either loss but I didn't expect them to be so close together and the lone remaining cat in the household was desolate--I finally had to go find another companion for her even though I wasn't at all ready to have a new cat in my life so soon after the death of the other two.
 
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