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MOATS
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mason Bone Cancer Study
Evaluation of a recombinant bacteria vaccine to treat bone cancer in dogs

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine whether a recombinant L. moncytogenes vaccine can elicit anti-tumor immunity and prolong survival in dogs with cancer of their long bones (appendicular osteosarcoma (OSA)).

Enrollment criteria and baseline evaluation of patients

We are actively recruting patients for a pilot study to determine the safety and efficiacy of a new bacteria based vaccine to stimulate an immune response against osteosarcoma and prolong survival in dogs with bone cancer. Only those dogs with a histological diagnosis of osteosarcoma and who have undergone limb amputation and standard chemotherapy (4 doses of carboplatin) for the treatment of osteosarcoma will be eligible for inclusion in the study. In addition, only those patients whose tumors express the target antigen “Her-2/neu” will be eligible for inclusion in this study.

Up to 18 privately owned dogs with long bone cancer (appendicular OSA) and confirmed expression of Her2-neu will be enrolled. At enrollment (3 weeks following the last dose of carboplatin chemotherapy), all eligible dogs will receive basic clinical laboratory tests including a Complete Blood Count (CBC), Chemistry Screen (CS) and urinalysis (UA) and a baseline evaluation of cardiac function by echocardiography and measurement of cardiac-specific Troponin I (cTnI) levels. Thoracic radiographs will be taken to determine whether pulmonary metastases are present. At the time of enrollment, a blood sample will be taken to assess immune function and baseline levels of anti-tumor immunity.

L.m recombinant treatment

All dogs will be vaccinated, there is no placebo control. The first vaccine will be given three weeks after the last dose of routine chemotherapy. Patients will receive a total of 3 vaccines given three weeks apart. Patients will stay in the hospital for 48 hours following vaccine administration for observation.

The study pays for the following:

  • Complete staging of disease at the time of enrollment (includes CBC, CS, UA, immune function assessment, thoracic radiographs, cardiac evaluation)
  • Three vaccines
  • Hospitalization for observation
  • CBC, CS, UA and cardiac evaluation every three weeks for a total of 9 weeks
  • Routine staging every 2 months following last vaccine administration (includes CBC, CS, UA, immune assessment, thoracic radiographs, cardiac evaluation)

Contact Us:
If you are interested in learning more about this study, please contact the Prinicipal Investigator Dr. Nicola Mason at 215 898 3996 or [email protected]
Bone Cancer Study
 

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Interesting, I've passed it along. Usually those who choose amputation don't pursue chemotherapy, so that is a huge requirement to qualify for the study, if I am reading that right.
 

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Mason Bone Cancer Study

Hi,

Thank you for posting information about the Mason Bone Cancer Study.

My dog is the first dog to receive treatment in this clinical trial. She is a 12 year old American bulldog, and was diagnosed with osteosarcoma on March 6th of this year. We chose to have her leg amputated, as this would provide her with immediate relief from the excruciating pain that the tumor was causing her. Recovery from the amputation was very rough for two days post op, but then Sasha's condition quickly improved. She was able to catch a thrown Frisbee after just three weeks. Not bad for a 12 year old, three legged dog!

She received four chemotherapy treatments with carboplatin, and then three weeks later, she was in Philly with Dr. Mason getting the Listeria Monocytogenes vaccine. She did very well during her time there, and is scheduled to go back for her second of three treatments on the 30th or 31st of this month.

Please wish her well, and check in on her progress at our blog: http://lilisnotes.com.

You can also read an article in the Philadelphia Inquirer about the Study and Sasha. Here is the URL for that: Penn researchers enlist dogs in battle against human cancers - Philly.com

Thanks again for posting this very important information in this forum.
 

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MOATS
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you so much for the update. I lost my very first Doberman to osteosarcoma, so it's a topic near and dear for me. I hope you will come back and continue to update us on Sasha's progress (we love all dogs here, not just Dobermans ;)). Good luck!


Hi,

Thank you for posting information about the Mason Bone Cancer Study.

My dog is the first dog to receive treatment in this clinical trial. She is a 12 year old American bulldog, and was diagnosed with osteosarcoma on March 6th of this year. We chose to have her leg amputated, as this would provide her with immediate relief from the excruciating pain that the tumor was causing her. Recovery from the amputation was very rough for two days post op, but then Sasha's condition quickly improved. She was able to catch a thrown Frisbee after just three weeks. Not bad for a 12 year old, three legged dog!

She received four chemotherapy treatments with carboplatin, and then three weeks later, she was in Philly with Dr. Mason getting the Listeria Monocytogenes vaccine. She did very well during her time there, and is scheduled to go back for her second of three treatments on the 30th or 31st of this month.

Please wish her well, and check in on her progress at our blog: http://lilisnotes.com.

You can also read an article in the Philadelphia Inquirer about the Study and Sasha. Here is the URL for that: Penn researchers enlist dogs in battle against human cancers - Philly.com

Thanks again for posting this very important information in this forum.
 
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