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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks. This is my first post here, though I've visited a few times.

Quick backstory:

My uncle's friend bought a dog from a breeder and had all the work done to get her ears done and such. She's a beautiful dog, really. Red/rust (or brown/rust? Not sure the terminology there) with the most stunning, almost wolf-like eyes. And she's a LOVEBUG. Problem is, she barks at just about anything. At first, it was the neighbor who informed me (as at the time I wore headphones all the time, and tuned everything else out), and then a few months later I switched from day time shifts to night time shifts. That leaves me with the problem of leaving her outside all day (where she barks, even with our golden retriever to keep her company), or keeping her kenneled during the day as well as at night.

After a year of the constant barking, I decided to try and find her a new home, which garnered some interest in various parties but it all fell through. One contact is still on the line about her, but I found out (late, as it's plainly on her pedigree papers but I overlooked it) that she's older than I first thought - not 3 years, but almost 5. This person was also interested in having her as a breeding dog, and I'm not comfortable with letting her go as a breeding dog, let alone at her age. (She isn't spayed yet, if that wasn't clear.)

Basically, my question is this: Her papers say "Pattie Lunsford" as the breeder, with the sire Commander Hurley Howitt, and the dam Sugar Baby Lunsford. I know some breeders want first dibs if their dog has to be given up for whatever reason, and since I found her paperwork, I want to contact this breeder to see if I can give her back to them.

Does anyone know the breeder Pattie Lunsford? What kennels/name she runs her breeding under? How I could contact her, to at least offer to return this dog to her?

Failing that, I'll be placing a thread up in the Rescue/Rehoming forum on this site, for the Houston area.

PS: She's due for her yearly and such by the end of this month, and at that time/shortly thereafter I plan on having her spayed before she goes anywhere.
 

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So, what have you done as far as training with your dog?

He barks because YOU allow it to happen. What's his daily schedule like? Have you ever attended basic OB classes?

Probably the best thing that could happen to your dog is if he found a new home, one that can provide his physical and mental needs.

It sounds harsh but it's really about the dog at this point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Alright, I've heard those comments throughout the past six+ months I've tried to seek advice and/or rehome this dog. It's really discouraging, when I'm just simply asking for help and advice to hear, "You're a bad person, terrible dog owner, you should never own a dog" etc etc. That's happened too many times to count. It's really upsetting because of a multitude of reasons.

1.) I'm asking for HELP, ie admitting I'm lacking in some aspect to help this dog fit best into my home, and yet I still get scolded and called names.

2.) Trying to rehome her myself, so as not to go to a shelter and dump her there to some unknown fate.

3.) Insisting she get spayed before sending her off to a new (and researched) home, so she does not end up a part of a puppy mill or otherwise being nothing more than a puppy oven.

4.) Applying the knowledge I've gained from a year's worth of work at a vet clinic to help better care for my animals.

I cannot put to words how irritating, offensive, and downright rude it is to be called irresponsible and a bad person for attempting to play things by the book.

I took this dog in to avoid her going to a shelter or being put off into someone less responsible's hands. Knowing that I have the ability to care for animals and having successfully raised our golden from puppy-hood into a well behaved, well mannered dog that everyone loves. With this doberman, my skills were not enough, and after having her for 6 months, three of which I was working day shifts and then three months on to present on night shifts, and the original owner quitting his job and becoming un-contactable, I've been trying to correct/work with this barking issue. If you wanted to get technical about it, you could say I was fostering this dog while trying to get her a new home, to no avail.

Yes, it boils down to barking. And it's not just a "hey, what's that? Hey, I'm here" barking, it's anything from boredom barking to vicious, "I don't know what you are but you're right there and I want to get to you through this fence and I will" barking.

Yes, I've attempted a plethora of methods to help curb it, to no avail. Beyond simple barking issues, it's "This owner works nights and cannot provide for this animal the way it needs, anymore, and in order to provide the best possible home, this owner is looking to rehome it and to abide by the fact that many breeders seek to reclaim their dogs". That was the whole point of this thread here.

Guys, I totally respect that you are thinking of the dog. Totally, 100% respect on that part. That said, without the full story, outright accusing an owner who is asking for help as being a bad person and irresponsible as a dog owner is rude, offensive, and thickheaded to the extreme.

It's sad that in this world, people seeking to rehome their animals ARE in fact irresponsible and ignorant of a dog's needs, which has forced this reputation onto folks who are legitimately looking to provide the best for their dogs - even if that means rehoming them. That does not mean that every single person is that way. That's akin to the radical extremists smearing the reputation of hardworking normal folk who just so happen to have (the same religion), (the same cultural life style), (the same clothing tastes), (the same musical tastes).

I am sorry to have ruffled your feathers like this, but I AM trying to do this right. And up to this point, I'm ready to throw my hands up, admit defeat, and surrender her to the local shelters. The whole thing I was trying to avoid doing, I've earned more disrespect and hate than if I just signed her over and went on with my life.
 

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Alpha
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A google search of that name brought up:

Pattie H Lunsford
(979) 549-0623

209 River Rd

Angleton, TX 77515-7742

Age: 60-64
Associated: Fred E Lunsford

She is also on Facebook.

Good luck. I give you props for not handing her over to be used in some back yard breeding program.
 

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I commend you for doing the right thing for the dog's well-being by knowing she needs a different kind of home with more expertise then you can provide. I'm glad you will also be spaying her before handing her over to someone, that is a very responsible way to re-home a dog!
 

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Whippet Up
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Alright, I've heard those comments throughout the past six+ months I've tried to seek advice and/or rehome this dog. It's really discouraging, when I'm just simply asking for help and advice to hear, "You're a bad person, terrible dog owner, you should never own a dog" etc etc. That's happened too many times to count. It's really upsetting because of a multitude of reasons.

1.) I'm asking for HELP, ie admitting I'm lacking in some aspect to help this dog fit best into my home, and yet I still get scolded and called names.

2.) Trying to rehome her myself, so as not to go to a shelter and dump her there to some unknown fate. T

3.) Insisting she get spayed before sending her off to a new (and researched) home, so she does not end up a part of a puppy mill or otherwise being nothing more than a puppy oven.

4.) Applying the knowledge I've gained from a year's worth of work at a vet clinic to help better care for my animals.

I cannot put to words how irritating, offensive, and downright rude it is to be called irresponsible and a bad person for attempting to play things by the book.

I took this dog in to avoid her going to a shelter or being put off into someone less responsible's hands. Knowing that I have the ability to care for animals and having successfully raised our golden from puppy-hood into a well behaved, well mannered dog that everyone loves. With this doberman, my skills were not enough, and after having her for 6 months, three of which I was working day shifts and then three months on to present on night shifts, and the original owner quitting his job and becoming un-contactable, I've been trying to correct/work with this barking issue. If you wanted to get technical about it, you could say I was fostering this dog while trying to get her a new home, to no avail.

Yes, it boils down to barking. And it's not just a "hey, what's that? Hey, I'm here" barking, it's anything from boredom barking to vicious, "I don't know what you are but you're right there and I want to get to you through this fence and I will" barking.

Yes, I've attempted a plethora of methods to help curb it, to no avail. Beyond simple barking issues, it's "This owner works nights and cannot provide for this animal the way it needs, anymore, and in order to provide the best possible home, this owner is looking to rehome it and to abide by the fact that many breeders seek to reclaim their dogs". That was the whole point of this thread here.

Guys, I totally respect that you are thinking of the dog. Totally, 100% respect on that part. That said, without the full story, outright accusing an owner who is asking for help as being a bad person and irresponsible as a dog owner is rude, offensive, and thickheaded to the extreme.

It's sad that in this world, people seeking to rehome their animals ARE in fact irresponsible and ignorant of a dog's needs, which has forced this reputation onto folks who are legitimately looking to provide the best for their dogs - even if that means rehoming them. That does not mean that every single person is that way. That's akin to the radical extremists smearing the reputation of hardworking normal folk who just so happen to have (the same religion), (the same cultural life style), (the same clothing tastes), (the same musical tastes).

I am sorry to have ruffled your feathers like this, but I AM trying to do this right. And up to this point, I'm ready to throw my hands up, admit defeat, and surrender her to the local shelters. The whole thing I was trying to avoid doing, I've earned more disrespect and hate than if I just signed her over and went on with my life.
Numero uno - do the responsible thing for the dog and spay her. Finding her a good responsible home will be easier if the new party doesn't have that expense. You owe at least that much to this dog.

Next contact rescue groups or a local breed club and see if they can help with some referrals. If you offer up donation and also are willing to keep her until a new home is found then these groups are much more likely to want to assist you. In addition rescue groups will insist the dog is spayed (and rightly so) if they were to help find her a home.

This dog now has a barking problem. One you created. What's done is done but be up front with the new owners about it or you will likely get the dog back.

Have you considered a no bark collar? There are collars that very effective and use things like citronella rather than a shock. Some dogs are just barkers and training them not to takes time and effort. Sometimes a no bark collar can be a effective and viable solution rather than rehoming.

Don't put an add in the paper or anywhere else. Those places are perused by puppy mill wannabees or worse.

Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
StarlaineK9:
Thanks for the suggestions. Yes, I've tried a few varieties of outright bark deterrents, including shock collars and a citronella one as well. I've also bought an "ultrasonic" thing, shaped like a bird feeder and hung that outside, right where she gets the most riled up. At first, the very first time we tried the collar, it worked, but then she learned to bark through it and quickly drained the batteries. This went on through several battery changes, and even a brand new collar with fresh batteries. It doesn't phase her anymore. The ultrasonic thing was a joke. My golden, who can bark on command, barked when asked and then quirked his head and looked at it (the device), so I knew it was something they could hear, but it did nothing for the doberman.

Trying to redirect the barking worked for a while, but now she completely stops barking when I'm in the immediate vicinity. Even if she knows I'm on the other side of the fence, if it's me, she just stands there and looks, or prances around contentedly. As soon as she's alone, the barking spree hits off. She doesn't bark in the house, either. If there are dogs outside that get her attention, she'll pace and whine, but won't bark. As soon as she's outside, literally as soon as all four paws are out the door, she joins in the conversation. This can be for dogs in the immediate area, or down the block, it doesn't matter. Kids walking by on their way to school, workers in the yards or in the pool behind us, the neighbor's kids in the back yard behind us, it doesn't matter. Anything, and she goes off.

Then there's the boredom barking. It sounds different than the other situations. I've gotten to where I can tell the difference in what may have set her off. There's a schnauzer in the corner house where we share about 6 feet of fence with, and that queues the vicious barking, versus the "You're talking so I'll talk too" barking, or the "Hey I'm right here, yo, listen to me", or the "I'm bored... yep... still bored..."

Toys in the yard, adding longer walks to the routine, play time, nothing helps except keeping her indoors. Unfortunately indoors she dislikes my cat (fixates on him, I won't dare turn my back if they're in the same room together), and I have to sleep during the day, so that really only leaves kenneling or locking up in a room. Neither of which is fair for the whole day, and I'd be worried for her taking out boredom somehow, destructively, plus when she's kenneled already at night.

None of this would be a problem, if I hadn't been switched to night shifts. It included a raise and better benefits, and was a full time position (who can get full time anymore? seriously). Basically, my 'career' is what's caused the whole mess to begin with.

I'm fully aware she needs a few things in order to be the happy, well loved and well taken care of dog that she deserves to be. This includes, all together or just a few, a.) someone with more time to spend with her directly, where she can spend more time indoors, b.) a bigger yard to run and play, c.) more play mates, and d.) a job. I can't provide her with these things, or at least enough of them to make a considerable impact.

Also, I am fully intending to have her spayed before she leaves my care, no matter to whom she goes. I don't care if she goes to the president's office, she'll be spayed.

pdubois64:
Thanks for the research. I sent a message to that Pattie and asked her if she was a breeder of dobermans. We'll see how that pans out.

It's funny how Google tailors its results. I searched multiple ways for a "Pattie Lunford" and continue to get no results, or very mixed results. Any combination of "Pattie" and "Lunford" and "Sugar Baby Lunford" and so on brings so many varied results, it's like finding a needle in a haystack.

Re: Doberman rescue
I've e-mailed them before and had an exchange with them. They may be my last option, barring the SPCA or some other shelter, in the long run. I was told, "Sure, we can take her, but we cannot physically take her right now. You can sign her over to us but continue to care for her until a foster home is found, which we cannot give a time frame on". Once I sign her over, I'll lose the ability to adopt her to another home, if that came sooner than a foster home was found, because she'd no longer be *my* charge.

All of this, I hope to at least try to contact the breeder of her first, because many breeders stipulate that a dog goes back to them if something happens and it cannot be cared for by the new owners anymore. I don't know if her original owners tried to contact the breeder before we came into the picture, but I wanted to at least attempt to contact before giving up entirely. I should have tried this method first, absolutely, but I had misplaced her papers (we're renovating a room as my brother's moving in when he gets out of the military - he's en route right now, due to arrive tomorrow). I found her papers today and... well, you see the results here.

Thanks guys, for your input and support. I really dislike that I felt compelled to lash out like I did, and I'm sorry for it. But after months of the same thing, it got to be too much, and I'd hoped for a level headed response to my efforts, here.

Ultimately, we all try to do the best for the animals, even if that means finding them a better home than we can provide. Unfortunately, that's where I'm at in this process. I love this dog, I really do, but she deserves more, and better, than I can give.
 

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I for one commend you for trying to do the right thing by the dog! I would dare to say that most of us here have had a problem where we had to make very hard decisions. And you had to have known you were going to get the snarky replies by the holier than thou. You said you love your dog and I have no reason to think otherwise. In fact your actions tell me that you do.

I had a barker (doberman) once and I'm here to say it's not an easy road to travel. It took me almost a year to get her to stop annoyance barking and what finally worked was an e-collar that I controlled. Having a command to use the half second before I pressed the button. The problem I find with bark collars are that there is no command involved, whether it's spray something in the dogs face or the ones that administer a electric shock. With the collar you control, you can make the hand of God reach out and touch her and she'll soon realize that your god and she'll have no idea when your going reach out and touch her. This take time and most importantly consistancy and timing which I'm guessing your neighbors have run low on.

You didn't create this problem intentionaly, but your situation changed which aggrevated the problem. We have to live our lives and I'm sure you started with the best intentions not knowing these changes were in your future. If I could predict the future I would live at the horse track.

So keep your search up but don't give up trying to fix the dog's behaviour . You may just solve the problem and not have to give up your dog that you love. But when possible spend time with her every second you can. This will also help.

Best of luck to you. I really mean that.

Gunny
 

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Holier Than Now
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Lackey, thank you for making that commitment to spay her prior to placing her.

If you can go ahead and get that done, and get her on the road to healing so she can travel, I am sure with all the rescuers we have on this board, we can find someone, somewhere, who has a foster home opening.

It may take some juggling to get her transported to wherever she winds up needing to go, but if the spay is already done and she's not in pain and well enough to travel, we could get that worked out, too.

Do you have pictures of her you can post? That will help get things rolling.

Also, what is her HW status? vWD?

Any other known medical issues? Behavior quirks (besides the obvious, barking)?

Does she get along with most dogs? (Most foster homes are going to have other fosters and/or resident dogs already.)

Sorry to shoot a bunch of questions at ya, but the answers should help get a realistic plan in place.
 

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I don't know where in TX you are, but I can also contact the good folks at the Doberman Rescue of North Texas if you'd like. They are in Grand Prairie (a Dallas suburb), and since I live in the area I could help with transport or possibly temporary fostering if needed. Any additional info you could provide about her personality and/or situations or environments that should be avoided with her would be very helpful.

I have a friend that just bought a house and is looking for a Doberman to add to her home currently as well. I need to see f she is open to a barky adult rather than a bitey puppy before I could say that she is a potential home, but keep you chin up. You aren't out of options yet. Thank you for trying to do what's best for her.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Hi folks,

Sorry it's taken a bit to get back to this thread. My brother arrived (safely) from his road trip, and is beginning is life as a civilian again. Add the fact that Grandparents are in town house-/dog-sitting for my Aunt and Uncle, plus the work week for me restarting (Tuesday nights are my Mondays)... It's been a fun couple of days. Very busy.

The doberman's name is Aster. Her original name was Hershey, from their first owners, but that didn't stick with us, and "Aster" just came out of nowhere and it stuck.

I have a couple pictures but they aren't that great. I'll get some better ones over the next few days. Most of them are awash in the flash from my phone, or overly dark if the flash is not used. Sorry about that.



RedFawnRising:
Regarding her medical status, her yearly is due by the end of this month. One of my coworkers/superiors works with us as her second job. Her main job is as the office manager of a vet clinic. I'm displeased with the service I've been getting at my regular vet, so am going to be attending her clinic in the hopes of finding a new regular vet for my animals. My plan is to visit either tomorrow, or have an appointment set up for next week, at which point I'll have a full update on her medical status, and have plans in motion for a spay.

Regarding vWD, I didn't know what that was until researching it just now. I have no records from when she did not belong to us - no breeder papers aside from her pedigree, an acknowledgement from the AKC on her registration, and a secondary letter of acknowledgement plus a card-like slip with the basic information on it. I also have a paper to sign her up for pet health insurance, signed by the original owner but otherwise not filled out. Other than that, from the original owners we received a crate with a beanbag in it (since replaced with bedding), a collar, a leash, and a small bag of the food she used to eat. That's about it. All of this can be included upon fostering/adoption, if the new owners/fosters want it, minus the collar and leash (I've replaced those as well).

Behavior quirks, aside from the obvious (barking): She's a very stubborn dog, and I think she has only one mode - Play mode. When we got her, she didn't have any basic commands that we knew of, so we had to train her to sit and to lay down. She's food obsessive, but not food aggressive, so that helped in doing some basic commands (Sit, lay down). Unfortunately she fixates on the foot/treat and since she knows how to sit or lay, any new command is ignored as soon as she sees the treat. It's a full blown, throw-herself-on-the-floor and begin drooling. It's almost funny. She also knows "Back" our "Out" to back out of a room or get to the border of a room (like the kitchen), but all bets are off when sitting at the couch and she wants attention.

She's a jumper, though has gotten better about it with me. Other people, she'll tear towards them like a bullet and run in circles and is generally over excited, and does need a strong hand to help train her properly. She likes to put a paw up on people, too. If told to sit, she'll sit and smack a paw on your thigh or hip.

I wouldn't trust her off the leash. On the leash, she pulls a bit but doesn't drag you down the street, but if she got the chance she'd likely bolt. She made it out of the house once and I chased her down the street before catching up with her (no easy feat), so while it's smart to keep animals on the leash, I'd bet it's a necessity for her unless she can be trained to follow at the heel at all times (not something I've been able to get).

As far as other animals, I think small animals are a no-go. She gets super riled up in the back corner of the house where we have a shared fence bit with a house that has a schnauzer, and it's the vicious barking. I'm not sure if that's just because she cannot see the other dog, or if it's because it's a small dog. I've brought her out front when the direct next door neighbors have their two small dogs out, and she fixates on them, watches them with ears up. I haven't been comfortable to give her the chance to go sniffing at the small dogs.

We had a resident golden retriever before we adopted her, and when she came in to the house she directly ignored him and explored the surroundings. He sniffed her all over and she didn't budge, didn't seem to care. Now, they play fight and love on each other (well, he loves on her), but there's been no aggression issues at all. I'm leaning towards the idea that she's fine around bigger dogs, around her same height or weight, but smaller animals there may be a risk.

About the play fighting - I've only heard the occasional yelp if it gets out of control or too physical, but generally the play fighting hasn't resulted in any lasting harm or issues between the two. Usually after a round, she'll lay down and our golden will proceed to lick her face and forehead for a good ten minutes. It's adorable. That said, when they do play fight, she SOUNDS ferocious. A lot of throaty sounds that aren't growls, but it sounds loud and she really gets into it.

Cats, she fixates on my cat, watches every move he makes if they've been in the same room together. I had him in my lap once and she sat at my knees and watched. He had enough and started to walk away/climb to the back of the couch and she nipped at him. It didn't get further than that, and now they are kept apart at all times. I'd say, no cats. More than likely no birds or rabbits or small prey animals.

She sings, sometimes, which was astoundingly cool at first. It's still a neat experience but she doesn't do it often.

When we first got her we had about a month of housetraining issues where she'd leave large presents in the entryway. I'm pretty sure that was a mixture of "this is a new place" type situation, and "I'm not with my old owners" issues. After that she hasn't had an issue since. My Uncle left her out of her crate one night and I came home for lunch to let them out and found her loose, but the house was fine (luckily).

If there is trash around that she can get into, she will. Our kitchen is near constantly blocked off with a grate, even if the trash is low, just to be safe.

Also, she whines a lot. I haven't been able to place it, but sometimes out of the blue she'll get up, pace, whine, then lay down. She's shown no sign of physical discomfort or any real reason to whine - she just does. Could be, "You aren't paying attention to me right now :(" whining, or "This is an uncomfortable position :(" whining.

Aside from this update, I haven't much more to share at the moment. Her yearly visit at the clinic this week or next week will have a better update on her. I can continue to update this post, but being as this is in the "breeder" forum, it may have become misplaced and now belongs in the Rescue forum. Not sure how the mods feel about that.

Guys, your support has been amazing. After being bristly at first, the outpouring of support almost brought tears to my eyes. I had thought this would be my best bet, being as it is FOR the breed, and the community takes care of its own (owners, former owners, seekers of knowledge or those interested in the breed, etc), and I'm so happy it's turned out to be the case. Thank you all.

Zephyr:
My Grandparents are from the Grand Prairie area, so if that ends up being the route taken, I could use it as an excuse to visit them when they are home. Thank you very much for the offer! We'll see how things go!

Gun_Slinger:
Thank you for the support. I'm glad to know that it's not just a, "You're a bad dog owner, you created this problem" and that sometimes dogs just ARE barkers. It's also comforting to know that there is a method to help actually fix the issue instead of masking it. It's sad that I cannot invest the time necessary to do it, myself, due to my career path.

ZeldaRules:
Firstly, thank you for the efforts you do to help the breed and other animals. Your page's front story of the emaciated dog was disturbing. I cannot believe people allow that kind of stuff to happen. Even if I'm completely broke, the animals get their food and their necessary care. To think people allow that to happen... But, while it does happen, the organizations put in place to help fix the problem/rehome/rehabilitate the hurt animals have earned 100% of my respect, and everyone who works with them as well. Thank you for that. And thank you for the offer. I really appreciate it.
 

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Thank you for putting such a good effort into answering those questions.

All that information will be really helpful, for whoever ends up fostering/placing her.

Please do let us know when you get a medical update.

The offer still stands to help you coordinate things--and if Zephyr can be the temp foster, that would be awesome, too, and they can let me know if there's anything I can do to help, long-distance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Quick little update to include more pictures of her, and a note that she has a vet appointment scheduled for Monday at noon. I hope to have an update that day or within the next days after (depending on how busy I am and computer access).







She's been trained to not go into the food until told "Okay" and followed by a gesture towards the food. She does this fine with me, though my Uncle, if/when he does the feeding, can't seem to get the same behavior out of her (or our golden).

If she seems thin... well, she has dry food available almost all day (a large bowl she snacks from if she wants), but as I just fed them and witnessed first hand, she'll pick out any wet food bits and spit out the dry. She's spoiled, I guess. :p
 

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I like her weight, she looks good. And oh my goodness is she ever so pretty!!! Why must she be so cute and goofy looking, far away, and me not ready for a second dog! If only the circumstances were right, i'd scoop her up in a heartbeat!

Good luck finding her a new home were she can be spoiled and loved like crazy :)
 
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If anything, she may be able to lose ~couple pounds. I prefer a leaner doberman, but not everyone agrees ;) She is still a very good looking girl! Very sweet expression....

By your description of her, it honestly sounds like she a 'typical' high energy dobe that needs a LOT of training, work, and redirecting. Outside of the barking, her other issues all seem pretty fair. I have certainly dog-sat dogs which much worse habits! I think a highly active person experienced in high energy dobermans and an obedience background could possibly work out for her.

I have to say, after reading this post I was so so very happy that the 'newbie' was a responsible owner trying to do what was best for the dog. Not only that, but you also realize your faults, listen to the great advice given, and know what you should be doing overall.

The wonderful doberman community is always going for the betterment of the breed, and I hope everything works out with some more local dobie help.

Good luck with the situation, and good for you for trying to do the right thing.
 

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I for one commend you for trying to do the right thing by the dog! I would dare to say that most of us here have had a problem where we had to make very hard decisions. And you had to have known you were going to get the snarky replies by the holier than thou. You said you love your dog and I have no reason to think otherwise. In fact your actions tell me that you do.

I had a barker (doberman) once and I'm here to say it's not an easy road to travel. It took me almost a year to get her to stop annoyance barking and what finally worked was an e-collar that I controlled. Having a command to use the half second before I pressed the button. The problem I find with bark collars are that there is no command involved, whether it's spray something in the dogs face or the ones that administer a electric shock. With the collar you control, you can make the hand of God reach out and touch her and she'll soon realize that your god and she'll have no idea when your going reach out and touch her. This take time and most importantly consistancy and timing which I'm guessing your neighbors have run low on.

You didn't create this problem intentionaly, but your situation changed which aggrevated the problem. We have to live our lives and I'm sure you started with the best intentions not knowing these changes were in your future. If I could predict the future I would live at the horse track.

So keep your search up but don't give up trying to fix the dog's behaviour . You may just solve the problem and not have to give up your dog that you love. But when possible spend time with her every second you can. This will also help.

Best of luck to you. I really mean that.

Gunny
I have a barker his isn't annoyance barking but squirrels. I had one that would go in the tree in the back and just chatter I actually believe it threw something. The first squirel was having so much fun he brought a friend and then they both chattered at him and ran back and forth on utility wires. Needess to say my neighbors weren't happy actually only one neighbor.

I also tried everything the barking wasn't at nite only during the day when he could see the squirrels. I wound up getting an Ecollar and it took 2 days to stop the barking. Then a while with the collar using only a tone. Then no collar now he only wears it occasionally if he starts to go nuts at the squirrels. Now the only thing I use is a tone. For the most part all I have to do is verbally correct him now and he stops I did however have training on the correct way to use an Ecollar.

The funny thing is when he ignored the squirrels they didn't hang around they definitely like tormenting him.
 
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