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My lil girl LOVES anything made from cloth, socks, clothing, toys, blankets, her crate bedding, etc. It's getting quite expensive keeping her crate padded. I've been replacing the padding (a twin size comforter) once a week because there are so many holes chewed in it - it offers very little comfort. It's getting expensive!! I also supply cloth toys, in her crate, but she seems to like the blankets BEST! :sadcry: I've tried not giving her a blanket but between guilt and her obvious discomfort -- I just can't do it! :rolleyesw

I've seen post from others whose babies have the same "affection" for cloth, what did you do? She also uses her blanket as a pacifier, falls asleep with it in her mouth! *too cute*

Hubby says it's retaliation because I do things like this to her.......................

 

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It will get a lot more expensive if she is ingesting fabric and it leads to a blockage in her intestines.

I buy value blankets at WalMart - they run about $7 Cdn for a twin. Each of my crates has 2 blankets in it. For a chewer, I lay the blanket out over the crate and spritz it with Bitter Apple. Turn it over, spritz the other side. Let dry. Put in crate. You will probably be investing in a fair bit of Bitter Apple to try to break her of the chewing.

As for cloth toys, you don't want her to chew cloth so why give cloth toys? On the one hand, it completely defeats your purpose. It's like getting mad at your dog for chewing your new shoes when you give an old shoe to chew. What's the difference to the dog? OTOH, I suppose it would give an outlet if she gives up chewing the blankets but it could still lead to an obstruction and therefore is not something I'd provide, personally.

This goes back to the "leave it" command, as well. I'd start working on it, and making sure to spend some time right there beside her when she's crated so that if she starts chewing you can tell her to leave it and correct her, if necessary.

If she is a dog that is actually eating cloth, I wouldn't feel the least bit guilty about removing her blanket completely. Her "discomfort" could save her life.
 

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MaryAndDobes said:
It will get a lot more expensive if she is ingesting fabric and it leads to a blockage in her intestines.
Fortunately - she's not eating it - just total destruction. :)

I buy value blankets at WalMart - they run about $7 Cdn for a twin. Each of my crates has 2 blankets in it. For a chewer, I lay the blanket out over the crate and spritz it with Bitter Apple. Turn it over, spritz the other side. Let dry. Put in crate. You will probably be investing in a fair bit of Bitter Apple to try to break her of the chewing.
This is also what I'm doing - comforters from Walmart. But never thought of the Bitter Apple, will definitely give it a try.

As for cloth toys, you don't want her to chew cloth so why give cloth toys? On the one hand, it completely defeats your purpose. It's like getting mad at your dog for chewing your new shoes when you give an old shoe to chew. What's the difference to the dog? OTOH, I suppose it would give an outlet if she gives up chewing the blankets but it could still lead to an obstruction and therefore is not something I'd provide, personally.
Ummmm.........well, I was kinda thinking the same thing but thought if I gave her items she was "allowed" to chew on - maybe she would know the difference! *duh on my part* :emo8:

This goes back to the "leave it" command, as well. I'd start working on it, and making sure to spend some time right there beside her when she's crated so that if she starts chewing you can tell her to leave it and correct her, if necessary.
She's very good with the "leave it" command but it doesn't last long. She'll leave it and go right back to what she was doing. I do my best to provide lots of different toys and LOTS of exercise. She gets, bare minimum, of 45 min. in the morning and 45 min. in the evening of frisbee chasing. Then she follows me all day long, never lays down to rest, unless we crate her and that's usually only when we leave.

If she is a dog that is actually eating cloth, I wouldn't feel the least bit guilty about removing her blanket completely. Her "discomfort" could save her life.
Agreed! I've seen no signs of ingestion! *thank goodness*

I should also say she's 11 mos. old, so I would think some of this is due to age. She is my 3rd. dobe and BY FAR the most active we've ever had! It blows my mind the amount of energy she has!:help_up_2
 

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MaryAndDobes said:
It will get a lot more expensive if she is ingesting fabric and it leads to a blockage in her intestines.

I buy value blankets at WalMart - they run about $7 Cdn for a twin. Each of my crates has 2 blankets in it. For a chewer, I lay the blanket out over the crate and spritz it with Bitter Apple. Turn it over, spritz the other side. Let dry. Put in crate. You will probably be investing in a fair bit of Bitter Apple to try to break her of the chewing.

As for cloth toys, you don't want her to chew cloth so why give cloth toys? On the one hand, it completely defeats your purpose. It's like getting mad at your dog for chewing your new shoes when you give an old shoe to chew. What's the difference to the dog? OTOH, I suppose it would give an outlet if she gives up chewing the blankets but it could still lead to an obstruction and therefore is not something I'd provide, personally.

This goes back to the "leave it" command, as well. I'd start working on it, and making sure to spend some time right there beside her when she's crated so that if she starts chewing you can tell her to leave it and correct her, if necessary.

If she is a dog that is actually eating cloth, I wouldn't feel the least bit guilty about removing her blanket completely. Her "discomfort" could save her life.
Good post Mary, I agree 100%. Dogs have died from eating pieces of blanket/soft toys from obstructions. I know of one Doberman that died from this and two that had obstructions and had to have emergency surgery to remove "soft" cloth things b/c they weren't passing thru their system. Please be careful.
Mary is right, only give her blankets (since you know she chews use bitter apple on these blankets) when you can correct the chewing (you are right there supervising). I would never let her mouth on your clothing at any point in time either, esp. not socks, they are known to cause obstructions as well in dogs. Keep all clothes put up and out of her reach and train her not to bother with them. Supervision is the key, as well as making sure she doesn't have the opportunity to do damage or eat things she shouldn't.

They do make a dog bed that is suppose to be good for chewers, it is in another thread. You might want to check that out for her.
 

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widow said:
She's very good with the "leave it" command but it doesn't last long. She'll leave it and go right back to what she was doing. I do my best to provide lots of different toys and LOTS of exercise. She gets, bare minimum, of 45 min. in the morning and 45 min. in the evening of frisbee chasing. Then she follows me all day long, never lays down to rest, unless we crate her and that's usually only when we leave.
Just now read this after I posted mine.

"Leave it" means "leave it". Not for a few seconds or not until the dog decides it is okay again, but leave that alone completely. Not it is okay if your back it turned, but it is not okay to bother it period.
So you might need to brush on that command for sure, esp. if you think she grasps the concept of the command already.

And I understand the high energy non stop puppy. It does get better, at around 2-2.5 years or so (at least it did with my non stop energy monster, who still has more energy than most every dog, but is much better than before). It is a challenge challenging these types of puppies and keeping them well behaved and entertained. But mine rarely tore things up like that, b/c the opportunity to do was just not there. At one point for a couple of months the crate was bare, I didn't like it, but I was not going to let all my stuff get torn up and possibly deal with an obstruction.

But you are letting her learn and maintain bad habits by being allowed to tear things up, the more she does it and the more she enjoys it, the greater than chances are that she will want to do it, even when she is not a "puppy" anymore.

I really like that picture of her btw:)
 

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Sounds like you have a cribber....LOL! I have been fortunate........Rudi and I have an agreement................I respect Rudi's things and he respects my things!
 
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