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Just reaching out for advice regarding puppy jumping, running etc at children. She just goes blind with excitement and can't control herself. We have been doing nilif and it is working very well with me and my husband but with the children it is very difficult. Also an issue with her jumping on them when they are on the sofa. She is not allowed on the sofa, never has and never will but if the kids are on it she's goes straight for it and them, non stop and I mean non stop. We have been teaching the children that THEY have to do the work as well because she has to respect them and we can't be there 24/7 in the future if we leave the room for a min she will go for them. She is rewarded with good behavior and showing bad gets you nothing but we also have to redirect in many cases. It is exhausting to say the least. She is on a leash with me 90% of the time she is out for her crate because of this. She is trained every day, multiple times a day for obedience/commands and this issue in particular is non stop training, it is consuming my every waking moment. We are not the let it slide, lazy dog owners and have been on top of this and her for weeks and weeks. Is it maybe a case of her pushing back harder before it finally ends? Any advise on switching up the training? TIA
 

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How old is your puppy?
 

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She just turned 4 months, European stocky big girl. She is so big and heavy already and she is extremly rough on her feet and movements but just wants to lick them to death and play. We are seeing progress. One of my daughters got scratched yesterday and cried and the pup stopped and walked up to her seemingly sorry and then went to lay down. Usually she would have tried to chase her and take her down 🤯 The mornings are the worst because she has been crated all night she is bursting.
 

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This is really normal for a puppy that age, especially with young kids in the house. Patience is going to be the key, and setting her up for success. You might want to get an x-pen so you can set up an area for her to be in where she can have a bit of "freedom" while not really interacting with the kids. Gates, crates and x-pens to control what she can do are really going to help. And you're right that it's also training your kids...the more "exciting" the kids are and the more running around and playing together they do, the harder it will be for her to see that she can't jump and play with them like they are puppies.

I would try to make sure she gets time to run and play outdoors like a puppy with some free play. Do what you can to use up some mental energy, too. Training in short bursts is good, always keep it fun. Using their nose is always a good way to use up energy and brain cells at the same time - sniffing games can be a great way to engage them. Hiding food for her to find, using puzzle toys, using stuffed Kongs and Toppls (once they know how those work, freezing them is great).
 

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I think you need to keep at it and just make sure she doesn't get the opportunity to emit these behaviors, because they are naturally reinforcing for her. It will take time and patience. She is still developing and unable to have the same level or self-control as an adult dog. Just keep at it and make sure she does not get a chance to repeat the behavior while she's still learning.
 

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Our last Doberman was not like this 😱 This girl is like him on caffeine pills 🤣 I thought he was the extent of it but she puts him to shame lol I'll keep working at it thanks everyone. Wish us
This is really normal for a puppy that age, especially with young kids in the house. Patience is going to be the key, and setting her up for success. You might want to get an x-pen so you can set up an area for her to be in where she can have a bit of "freedom" while not really interacting with the kids. Gates, crates and x-pens to control what she can do are really going to help. And you're right that it's also training your kids...the more "exciting" the kids are and the more running around and playing together they do, the harder it will be for her to see that she can't jump and play with them like they are puppies.

I would try to make sure she gets time to run and play outdoors like a puppy with some free play. Do what you can to use up some mental energy, too. Training in short bursts is good, always keep it fun. Using their nose is always a good way to use up energy and brain cells at the same time - sniffing games can be a great way to engage them. Hiding food for her to find, using puzzle toys, using stuffed Kongs and Toppls (once they know how those work, freezing them is great).
Thanks we'll try those things you suggested. Sounds like excellent thing to add to her day 🤗
 

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According to me, you should consult a nearby animal hospital or vet clinic they can give you appropriate advice related to that, they have contacts with dog trainers and experts, as per your query so far I think your puppy is very young just 4 months old that'why she needs proper training, she showed love by doing like this.
She is very well trained for a young puppy. She knows all basic commands as well as advanced already (not without flaw but extremely consistent) I can even throw McDonald's on the floor and say leave it and she will leave it. Say drop it and she drops it. She knows go, as in leave the room, amongst others. It's the energy created by the sheer sight of children and she can't concentrate. Last night and today have been like a switch finally clicked in her head 😇 She was playing much calmer puppy play off and on, jumping here and there but not fight club lol and able to be redirected. Was she just giving on last college try to see if she can win? 😆 Honestly it's the intensity of energy and not obedience. This dog is very obedient and very well trained for a pup.
 

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😆 Honestly it's the intensity of energy and not obedience. This dog is very obedient and very well trained for a pup.
I know what you mean ! For my dog, the weakness was - and always has been - food! Very smart, very responsive to training, but he needed a lot of guidance as he matured in order to not go all cookie monster near food that wasn't his. Patience, patience, patience! 🤦🏻‍♀️
 

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I know what you mean ! For my dog, the weakness was - and always has been - food! Very smart, very responsive to training, but he needed a lot of guidance as he matured in order to not go all cookie monster near food that wasn't his. Patience, patience, patience! 🤦🏻‍♀️
😅 This one's a foodie too so we went straight for the leave it training haha we could not eat without a brawl 🥴 counter surfing is going to be a fun challenge in a few weeks lol bring it on
 

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As far as the children they need to be taught that the dog is invisible.
Encourage children to ignore the dog At all times.
I tell my grandchildren, Hoss is invisible.
Meanwhile you keep pup tied to your hip with a 6 foot lead.
When off lead pup should be crated or is a designated puppy area .
Prevention is the key. Prevention applies to all unwanted behaviors.
Humans are smarter than dogs so prevent the incident from even happening.
You know your dog and you know it going to happen.
As the dog matures it will grow out of this wrestling phase.
Meanwhile let kids know “no eye balling the dog”.
If I stare at Hoss long enough (not saying a word) thats screams to him “game on”.
So kids ....this dog is invisible for awhile.
And Human man your post (At the other end of that 6 foot lead).
Now go tell that pup the way its going to be from now on. LOL
 

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I think you are doing a good job - it will get better! A tired puppy is a good puppy would be my advice at this point.
how old are your kids?
 

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That tactic seems to be working really well 🤗 We had a very good evening and day today 🥰 But for sure this is going to be a long haul and don't want to do a victory dance just yet. One child is very good at it and the other not so much, unfortunately. But she's getting alot better at it. The puppy is trying so hard bless her heart, she's such a loving girl. Maybe a bit too loving lol
I think you are doing a good job - it will get better! A tired puppy is a good puppy would be my advice at this point.
how old are your kids?
They are 5 and 9. Not too small but definitely giving us some trouble with it. Our first Dobe our oldest was only 4 and he was way less persistent in the chase for children. This girl is way too much in love with kids lol definitely a plus for when this settles down though
 

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Just reaching out for advice regarding puppy jumping, running etc at children. She just goes blind with excitement and can't control herself. We have been doing nilif and it is working very well with me and my husband but with the children it is very difficult. Also an issue with her jumping on them when they are on the sofa. She is not allowed on the sofa, never has and never will but if the kids are on it she's goes straight for it and them, non stop and I mean non stop. We have been teaching the children that THEY have to do the work as well because she has to respect them and we can't be there 24/7 in the future if we leave the room for a min she will go for them. She is rewarded with good behavior and showing bad gets you nothing but we also have to redirect in many cases. It is exhausting to say the least. She is on a leash with me 90% of the time she is out for her crate because of this. She is trained every day, multiple times a day for obedience/commands and this issue in particular is non stop training, it is consuming my every waking moment. We are not the let it slide, lazy dog owners and have been on top of this and her for weeks and weeks. Is it maybe a case of her pushing back harder before it finally ends? Any advise on switching up the training? TIA
Hello. 15+ years with Dobermans (5 Dobermans) and one thing that I found that works for jumping with most any dog is to snap a leash on the collar (use a buckle collar to avoid choking) and put your foot firmly on the leash (wear shoes) at the point the leash is hitting the floor. The leash between the collar and the floor should be taught so that your dog cannot get her front paws off the ground. Have someone walk up to her and try to get her excited. Repeat several times by having the person leave the area and reproach and she will eventually realize she cannot jump and she should correct herself. Be sure to reward her only when she stops struggling or sits, but reward in a calm voice or give a treat. There probably is a video out there somewhere showing the process. I have used this technique and have helped many people with dog jumping issues and this technique works very well. Good luck!
 

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Hello. 15+ years with Dobermans (5 Dobermans) and one thing that I found that works for jumping with most any dog is to snap a leash on the collar (use a buckle collar to avoid choking) and put your foot firmly on the leash (wear shoes) at the point the leash is hitting the floor. The leash between the collar and the floor should be taught so that your dog cannot get her front paws off the ground. Have someone walk up to her and try to get her excited. Repeat several times by having the person leave the area and reproach and she will eventually realize she cannot jump and she should correct herself. Be sure to reward her only when she stops struggling or sits, but reward in a calm voice or give a treat. There probably is a video out there somewhere showing the process. I have used this technique and have helped many people with dog jumping issues and this technique works very well. Good luck!
That's a very good tip. Thank you so, so much I will definitely be adding that. I have been stepping on the leash but leaving alot more room than that and that makes so much more sense than what I've been doing. The oldest child has been having alot of good interactions with her lately (controlled of course, uncontrolled interactions would be a disaster haha) The pup is responding but still so much excitement she's trying so hard, you can tell she knows what we are requesting. I've been wondering something that I have not tried at all because I don't want to take two steps back when we've been seeing progress. But I've been wondering if teaching her the "up" command would be beneficial or harmful to this process considering she still has such a strong urge to jump up 🤔 I'm leaning towards bad idea but still wondering hmm?
 

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Bad idea, I think--I think it is easier for a dog to learn that they can never do something than it is for them to deal with sometimes they can and sometimes they can't.
 

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That's a very good tip. Thank you so, so much I will definitely be adding that. I have been stepping on the leash but leaving alot more room than that and that makes so much more sense than what I've been doing. The oldest child has been having alot of good interactions with her lately (controlled of course, uncontrolled interactions would be a disaster haha) The pup is responding but still so much excitement she's trying so hard, you can tell she knows what we are requesting. I've been wondering something that I have not tried at all because I don't want to take two steps back when we've been seeing progress. But I've been wondering if teaching her the "up" command would be beneficial or harmful to this process considering she still has such a strong urge to jump up 🤔 I'm leaning towards bad idea but still wondering hmm?
I would stick to the basic obedience commands for now: sit, down, stay, come. Another tip is to always have her go last to establish she is not the decision maker/head of the household. Meaning, if she rides in the car, all humans get in the car first and she goes in last. Same with exiting the vehicle. She should go last when entering and exiting the home. Humans first. Dobermans are very strong minded and if they do not have rules to follow, they may make-up their own. I also suggest that you practice entering a room with her on a leash with multiple people seated throughout the room. When she first sees the people she will most likely be excited and want to run and jump on them. At the first sign of excitement, which I like to call level 1, tell her "no" and immediately go into another room where she cannot see the people. Wait until she is calm and quietly head back toward the people room. Again, at the first sign of excitement, repeat "no" and immediately turn and go into another room. Wait until she is calm and head back to the people room. The more you repeat this you should see that you each trip you make you will get closer to the people before she shows excitement until eventually, you have her in front of a person and she made it the entire way without showing excitement. If she shows no excitement up to the point you reach a person, calmly reward her with a "good girl" and a treat. If you say "good girl" with excitement, it will probably set her off. If at anytime she jumps on someone or gets too excited, snap the leash on and remove her from the room and repeat the above exercise. Your dog should realize over time that she can stay with people if she is calm. If she is too excited, she is removed from people. I suggest that you remove her immediately anytime she shows unwanted excitement toward humans. No words, just action. Leash on and out of the room she goes and only allowed to return on leash when she is calm. These are extremely smart dogs so it should not take her long to figure it out. I used this technique on a female Doberman pup, which at about 7 mos. old jumped on an elderly person with such force it broke through the drywall. They were ready to give up the fight and find her a new home. She had a lot of energy and jumped on everyone that was in the home whether they were sitting or standing. I hope this makes sense. I find it easier to explain it with my voice and not typing. LOL. Let me know if you try it and how it works out. If you have questions, I'm happy to offer advice. If one technique doesn't work, you try another. All dogs are different even if the same breed.
 

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I would stick to the basic obedience commands for now: sit, down, stay, come. Another tip is to always have her go last to establish she is not the decision maker/head of the household. Meaning, if she rides in the car, all humans get in the car first and she goes in last. Same with exiting the vehicle. She should go last when entering and exiting the home. Humans first. Dobermans are very strong minded and if they do not have rules to follow, they may make-up their own. I also suggest that you practice entering a room with her on a leash with multiple people seated throughout the room. When she first sees the people she will most likely be excited and want to run and jump on them. At the first sign of excitement, which I like to call level 1, tell her "no" and immediately go into another room where she cannot see the people. Wait until she is calm and quietly head back toward the people room. Again, at the first sign of excitement, repeat "no" and immediately turn and go into another room. Wait until she is calm and head back to the people room. The more you repeat this you should see that you each trip you make you will get closer to the people before she shows excitement until eventually, you have her in front of a person and she made it the entire way without showing excitement. If she shows no excitement up to the point you reach a person, calmly reward her with a "good girl" and a treat. If you say "good girl" with excitement, it will probably set her off. If at anytime she jumps on someone or gets too excited, snap the leash on and remove her from the room and repeat the above exercise. Your dog should realize over time that she can stay with people if she is calm. If she is too excited, she is removed from people. I suggest that you remove her immediately anytime she shows unwanted excitement toward humans. No words, just action. Leash on and out of the room she goes and only allowed to return on leash when she is calm. These are extremely smart dogs so it should not take her long to figure it out. I used this technique on a female Doberman pup, which at about 7 mos. old jumped on an elderly person with such force it broke through the drywall. They were ready to give up the fight and find her a new home. She had a lot of energy and jumped on everyone that was in the home whether they were sitting or standing. I hope this makes sense. I find it easier to explain it with my voice and not typing. LOL. Let me know if you try it and how it works out. If you have questions, I'm happy to offer advice. If one technique doesn't work, you try another. All dogs are different even if the same breed.
Sounds like an excellent exercise for her. Thank you so much! She for sure would get it after a bit, she is definitely a smart one. When she's not going crazy with excitement lol
 

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I would stick to the basic obedience commands for now: sit, down, stay, come. Another tip is to always have her go last to establish she is not the decision maker/head of the household. Meaning, if she rides in the car, all humans get in the car first and she goes in last. Same with exiting the vehicle. She should go last when entering and exiting the home. Humans first. Dobermans are very strong minded and if they do not have rules to follow, they may make-up their own. I also suggest that you practice entering a room with her on a leash with multiple people seated throughout the room. When she first sees the people she will most likely be excited and want to run and jump on them. At the first sign of excitement, which I like to call level 1, tell her "no" and immediately go into another room where she cannot see the people. Wait until she is calm and quietly head back toward the people room. Again, at the first sign of excitement, repeat "no" and immediately turn and go into another room. Wait until she is calm and head back to the people room. The more you repeat this you should see that you each trip you make you will get closer to the people before she shows excitement until eventually, you have her in front of a person and she made it the entire way without showing excitement. If she shows no excitement up to the point you reach a person, calmly reward her with a "good girl" and a treat. If you say "good girl" with excitement, it will probably set her off. If at anytime she jumps on someone or gets too excited, snap the leash on and remove her from the room and repeat the above exercise. Your dog should realize over time that she can stay with people if she is calm. If she is too excited, she is removed from people. I suggest that you remove her immediately anytime she shows unwanted excitement toward humans. No words, just action. Leash on and out of the room she goes and only allowed to return on leash when she is calm. These are extremely smart dogs so it should not take her long to figure it out. I used this technique on a female Doberman pup, which at about 7 mos. old jumped on an elderly person with such force it broke through the drywall. They were ready to give up the fight and find her a new home. She had a lot of energy and jumped on everyone that was in the home whether they were sitting or standing. I hope this makes sense. I find it easier to explain it with my voice and not typing. LOL. Let me know if you try it and how it works out. If you have questions, I'm happy to offer advice. If one technique doesn't work, you try another. All dogs are different even if the same breed.
That exercise you suggested worked almost immediately 😳 She was able to be unleashed within minutes! With me in close proximity of course. Wow, Wow, Wow!
She was pretty wound up this morning so me and her did some hard play with tossing a ball around etc. Once she got some of that energy out the exercise was repeated. Again within minutes unleashed 😀 A few slip ups here and there but immediately out of the room we go and she's fine right after. This is amazing 🤩
 
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