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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
In browsing for available adult Dobermans I have noticed that European Dobies with natural ears seem to have smaller ear flaps than Americans. Are they being bred for smaller flaps? lt would seem good since a number of countries don't allow cropping and smaller flaps get away from a hound look.

I am a senior seeking a companion dog but the agencies are hard to work with. It seems that they want too much information from me so I have drifted to craigslist.com. I guess I am contrary but don't like having to prove myself worthy of dog ownership.

Dog Carnivore Dog breed Working animal Fawn
Dog Dog breed Carnivore Companion dog Sporting Group
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
It's not my first time, I had a Dobe (female) years ago (medium crop). Then a wolf-dog until he passed. I have outlived my vet and I am not about to open my home to strangers. Some Dobe is going to miss out on a good home unless one shows up on Craigslist with a nice medium ear crop or small natural ears.

Here's a prime example of ridiculous ears IMO.
Dog Carnivore Dog breed Dobermann Fawn
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
To be fair, that's a young puppy who will grow into those long ears. My boy looked much the same as a puppy, but his ears suit him just fine now.
View attachment 154953


In regards to trouble working with agencies (I am assuming you mean rescues?), I do know it can be frustrating. As someone who has worked in rescue for nearly 2 decades now, I can say that many of the dogs who come in and need a new home have been to hell and back already. We work hard to be sure each dog/animal has the best chance at finding their forever home. In order to find the best match, we need a lot of information. Typical information we seek is past animal ownership and vet records for those animals (we call the vet), as previous performance is a good indicator of what someone will do in the future. We do home visits to see where and how the animal will be kept because anyone can say anything on an application or email. We talk to references, we ask what goals you have for the dog (no judgement involved here, many people just want a couch potato). Again, all done in the best interest of each animal. If we had no rules or standards, these dogs would end up in a mess all over again. It is a hard "job", volunteering with rescue, but it is very much needed and, when things go right, feels amazing. Just wanted to give you info from the other side of the coin.

Best wishes in your search.
Nice Dobe! Still a bit tall for me but that's just me. I do understand the other side of the issue. If I were to find a candidate close by I think the breeder or rescue agency could get to know me w/o a home invasion. I had interest in a Carolina Dog (American Dingo) and kinda got to know (via email exchange and telecons) the biologist responsible for recognition of the breed. He offered me a pup but I wanted to rehome an adult. I tried Petfinder but the dog was 3 hrs away. It would have required 3 round trips to seal the deal if approved. I offered to do it all in one trip but never heard back. Here's a CD pic if your not familiar with the breed.
Dog Plant Dog breed Tree Carnivore
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The medium crop on my girl turned out well. However I had seen so many bad crops that I was fearful going in. And that was before the extra tall spiky look became popular. IIRC her ears were taped only a few weeks and no posts back then. Of course if I find an adult to adopt I won't have to go through all that but I'll seek a crop more proportional to head size.

In beauty a regal Dobie is second only to a well bred wolf-dog (which is hard to find).
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
If you are looking for and adult dog is more important his temperament since you would not had raised him and you dont know what your are dealing with. The size or crop of the ears is meanless.
The crop of the ears are not the only thing but it's something I would be looking at every day so I want it to be right. Here's what Dobies looked like when I fell in love with the breed. Obviously others don't agree with me thus the standard has drifted. But for me as with art the proportion is important. This is Ch Rancho's Dobe Storm.
Dog Dog breed Carnivore Terrestrial animal Snout
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Nah, I just view craigslist every day. I have seen some good candidates but they were too far away for a go see. My son found a nice wolf-dog on craigslist. The price went from $700 to $350 and finally free. He was also given the breeder's phone number and had a good discussion with the breeder. It just takes patience to find what one wants and rehoming a good Dobe with me will be a win for me and definitely a win for the dog. Some people find themselves in dire situations and need help. One just has to be able to discern.

I served a few years as director of a crisis pregnancy center. It's ironic but at that time it was easier for our enemy to take a girl for an abortion (w/o her parents permission) than it is to adopt a dog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I really wasn't asking for help I was just chatting about the differences in the ears of American vs European Dobes. The adoption issue was just a rant.

I had Thanksgiving dinner in a home with a sweet rescue dog. I mentioned the problem of overrun shelters vs the premise that adopters are evil until proven otherwise. It turns out the host had been refused an adoption in Dallas because she didn't have a fenced yard. Yet she had worked with dogs and horses all her life and had done rescue work as a volunteer. She knew more about dogs (and her capability to provide) than the person that turned her down.

When a dog is rehomed there's a minimum of three lives affected. The person that is giving up the dog, the dog and the person adopting the dog. The two lives most vulnerable are the first two yet the agency facilitating the exchange seems more concerned about the dog than any humans involved. The previous owner needs to feel comfortable with the placement, the dog needs to be shown love and the new owner (especially if a senior) needs loving companionship. If possible I would remain in contact with the previous owner. For example if they were in a nearby rest home or apartment maybe occasional visits could be arranged. That's just one scenario but I think the corporate armor of the agency needs to be pierced allowing the adopter to have direct contact (email, phone or preferably in person) with the owner rather than the applications and background checks. I suspect the oft quoted dog baiting ruse is not a risk at all especially with well established seniors such as me. Those operating our local shelter only know how to crate, feed and euthanize dogs not how to place them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I flag every Doberman ad on Craigslist because 99% of the time the ads are from backyard breeders who do no health testing and think they can make a quick buck. In addition to that it's against Craigslist policy to list animals that are not livestock
I think you're correct. I would never choose a puppy from craigslist but I am seeking an adult dog in need of rehoming (meeting my specific requirements). I have not been able to get a breeder to keep my name on file in case one of their dogs falls into that situation.
 
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