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Hi I was recommended to use a spray on my dogs food for his dry spots.

Does anyone know where I can purchase this type of spray and maybe a site that I can order from that donates to dobermans?
 

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I definitely recommend seeing a vet before giving anything just to rule out somethings such as mange. If your dobe is a blue then they tend to be prone to some skin issues. I give my blue girl fish oil which helps her skin tremendously. But see your vet first.
 

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Best to get it checked out by your vet. Thyroid full panel tests?
If its just dry skin What kind of food do you feed? You can put lots of stuff in food, Pure Olive oil, Fish oil, Sardines, Coconut oil.
Do not give a lot of baths!
Also I make my own coat spray. Found it in Doberman Digest
24oz spray bottle
Listerine (Yes the mouthwash)
Alpha Keri or CVS Shower & Bath Oil
Any Human Hair Conditioner I try and get an all Natural one
Filtered or Bottled Water
Kiwi Soft shoe brush and a little stiffer one.
Microfiber cloth

Bottle mixture
Listerine 1in
Shower bath oil .5in
Hair Conditioner 2in
Add water to top

Spray coat with Filtered or Bottled Water
Wipe with cloth
Brush with the stiffer brush
Wipe again with cloth
Spray with Coat Spray
Brush in with soft brush
Depending on the condition of coat. You can use daily to get coat in condition and then weekly to maintain
 

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Hey Stryker2,

Even though I prefer to deal with skin issues from the inside out (generally food and a little added oil--I use fish oil) a lot of people really like that formula you put up. HOWEVER--don't use a stiff brush on a single coated, short haired dog. It's a great way to develope a nice case of folliculitis. Use the very softest natural bristle brush you can find--the shoe polish brushes work well for this but just the the microfiber cloth will do the same thing and a real chamois does it even better (dampen and wring out well--brush or wipe only in the direction of the lay of the hair.
 

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Hey Stryker2,

Even though I prefer to deal with skin issues from the inside out (generally food and a little added oil--I use fish oil) a lot of people really like that formula you put up. HOWEVER--don't use a stiff brush on a single coated, short haired dog. It's a great way to develope a nice case of folliculitis. Use the very softest natural bristle brush you can find--the shoe polish brushes work well for this but just the the microfiber cloth will do the same thing and a real chamois does it even better (dampen and wring out well--brush or wipe only in the direction of the lay of the hair.
I thought by using a little stiffer brush with a little pressure would stimulate the skin and loosen up any dead skin.
 

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I thought by using a little stiffer brush with a little pressure would stimulate the skin and loosen up any dead skin.
Generally what actually happens is that you succeed in irritating the skin and hair follicles--the result is usually skin sloughing (looks like dandruff) and irritation of the follicle and if the irritation is sufficient they dog will often end up with a lovely generalized skin infection (most often staph since that's a bacteria which is normal skin flora on mammals--superficial irritation of the skin surface is enough to allow bacteria to reach layers of the dermis which it is NOT a normal inhabitant of and cause infection.

On the DPCA website, in the section Breeder Education, there is a really good piece on bathing dogs--it should be required reading for anyone who has ever owned a short coated, single coated dog. One of the leading causes of dandruff (which gets interpreted as "dry skin") is incorrect bathing--use cold rather than warm water--dog skin doesn't like warm water and rinse more thoroughly than you ever thought you needed to. Don't scrub at the dogs coat with those rubber things like curry brushes, your finger nails or anything else. Don't brush their coats with stiff brushes--you don't need to.

Most coats of this type can be cleaned well between bathing with a dampened towel--you don't necessarily need to bathe with shampoo, just wipe the dog down in the direction the hair lies with plain old water on the towel.

If the dog has an actual skin condition discuss it with your vet or if necessary with a vet dermatologist--medicated shampoos will take care of most skin problems in thier initial stages. There are very few conditions that warrent brushing a short coated dogs hair to "stimulate the skin and loosen up dead skin".
 

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I thought by using a little stiffer brush with a little pressure would stimulate the skin and loosen up any dead skin.
Bug is dead on correct about this, I found out the hard way. Back in the day when I was new in this breed, I was using a stiff rubber brush when I shampooed my doberman puppy-every time I did, she developed a staph infection. Read an article in an old doberman magazine by Marj Brooks, who talked about how to bathe a doberman correctly. I started being more gentle- no more problems with staph.
 

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Thanks for the info. I will stick with the soft brush.
We don't give our dobes alot of baths because they will take the natural oils out of the skin. If they get muddy we just hose them off.
 

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about every six months I get my female in the shower and lather up with baby shampoo and I rinse good. I towel her dry and then blow dry....she sleeps with me so she's smelling like a baby :roflmao:!!
 
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