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Hello,

Getting our first Doberman in July, and have been looking at dog fences. Any suggestions? Our city does not allow regular fences so we may have to go with an electric fence. I trained my black lab to stay out of the road, but feel like we may need a fence this time.

Don't worry, we don't leave our dog outside alone with or without a fence.

I appreciate any feedback.

Thanks,
Mike
 

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Hairy Dog, RIP Caesar, Katana, Kip, Capri
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Will your area allow small fences--like the kind you put around a garden plot--little low picket fences, preferably without sharp points, and with slats he can’t wiggle between or under? If you’re always out in the yard with him and you make sure, while he’s young, that he doesn’t find out he can go over them (have them up before you get him and walk him near them on a leash so you can keep him from climbing over), there’s a possibility that he *might* respect the barrier even when he is older. Maybe.... At least, I have had two that have respected fences that they could easily have gone over as an adult if they tried, because they learned they couldn’t cross them when they were younger.

One way or another, you’ll probably need some form of restraint and will need to be out with him--lots of obedience training, of course, and don’t let him off a leash or a long line until you are SURE his recall is bomb-proof.



Electric fences to me do more harm that good. A dobe can and will blow through them--the little shock won’t deter them--and then they can’t get back into your yard. Not to mention, of course, that any animal can get INTO your yard and your dog is also at risk of being bothered or stolen by any passer-by.
 

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Your city doesn't allow for a privacy fence?!? I've never heard of such lunacy!

I'd stay away from electric bc I will tell you when my bitch is in prey mode there's no amount of electric shock that would keep her in and they are smart enough to know that.
 

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I am with G_R and Mel here on electric (invisible) fences.

My sis has Weims, Labs and Pitties. The Lab and pit bull were fine being confined with shock fence. Yet, her current oldest Weimaraner, who has a quite strong prey drive as, G_R mentioned, payed absolutely no attention to their electric fence... On the way out, he picked his corner and went for it. And he was almost 9 at the time.

The real problem is when he wanted back in. Didn't happen.

I seriously doubt the an active Dobe with any kind of drive will be deterred by an "invisible fence".

JMO
John
Portland OR
 

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see what they will allow - if they don't allow a fully fenced yard, see if they will allow a "dog run" of about 20' x 30' next to the house. I have one that is graveled that I use to keep my yard from being torn up all the time. My yard is fully fenced also - but they don't have access to it unless we let them. If you could have a dog run for potty time, etc... and then consider an electric fence for when you can be out with him that might work. I know of whole neighborhoods that don't allow fences, but have never heard of a town that didn't allow them.
 

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We have an electric fence that so far has worked well for us. Our first doberman was easy to train but she was very obedient from the start. Our current dobe has a very high prey drive and wasn't as focused in all training, lol. He just required more work is all and to mentally grow up.
The training for the fence is very important. Don't rush it or use shortcuts. Put the time in. We worked with our current dobe many times a day because he required more training to just listen and focus in general. We have the fence with clear visual boundaries ( woods or bushes, flags, etc) to mark were the invisible fence is. Training to the signal sound with the response to run back away from it is important. We worked with that a lot, to become a conditioned response, before we ever let him close to where he would receive the correction. We kept the training flags up for a very long time and for our current boy on a long lead line in the yard until we were sure he would respect his boundaries. He is currently 5 and stops well before the fence when he chases those darn squirrels that tease him. As puppies, I think, that zap leaves a lasting impression in their mind. At least for ours, it took only once for both of them. Someone is always around and I would never leave my dog unattended even if I had an actual fence.
 
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