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Has anyone every heard of Doberman Nacrolepsy(sometimes called Cataplexy) and/or have a narcoleptic doberman? Its supposedly very rare, but do any breeders currently test for it anyway? Does anyone think it should be tested for to prevent it from becoming more common?

Here is a link to a youtube video of two narcoleptic Dobermans

Narcolepsy in dogs - YouTube

, and a company that tests for the disease. There is also a nice article about it at the bottom of the page.

Optigen Narcolepsy - NARC - Test for Dachshund, Doberman Pinscher, Labrador Retriever
 

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The DNA test for narcolepsy in Dobermans was the first DNA test we had available, I think. I didn't know Optigen offered it, I knew of it through HealthGene in Canada.

There apparently was a colony of narcoleptic Dobermans kept at Tufts (I think?) for some time for research purposes.

I'm coming up on 30 years in Dobermans, and I've never personally seen a case of it. Occasionally/rarely, I'll read something on an internet forum or group that makes me think that maybe the poster's dog has it. Oddly enough, we were discussing it (and other DNA tests) amongst a few breeders of various breeds after obedience class last night. Specifically, we were discussing "useless" DNA tests, and where does it end? Not that I don't appreciate the option of a DNA test for narcolepsy, it doesn't seem like a necessity, at least for me at this time, and I've certainly never used it.
 

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Oddly enough, we were discussing it (and other DNA tests) amongst a few breeders of various breeds after obedience class last night. Specifically, we were discussing "useless" DNA tests, and where does it end? Not that I don't appreciate the option of a DNA test for narcolepsy, it doesn't seem like a necessity, at least for me at this time, and I've certainly never used it.
Pretty much the way I feel, too. I think the "where does it end" question is well put in this instance.
 

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We recently sprung a young 1 year old Dobe girl from an area shelter who has narcolepsy. This was diagnosed by our vet. She doesn't seem to have full cataplexy attacks, but rather is drowsy during the day, has prolonged day time naps, more so than any other 1-2 year old Dobe I've met. She also twitches, especially in the lower limbs and will fall asleep in a sitting or even standing position after exciting play, like at the dog park. She will sometimes drop to a recumbent position, but I haven't seen her go lateral. Our vet is recommending treatment with Ritalin. She's a fun loving girl, and doesn't seem too bothered by her symptoms right now, but I've never seen it besides in youtube videos.
 

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We recently sprung a young 1 year old Dobe girl from an area shelter who has narcolepsy. This was diagnosed by our vet. She doesn't seem to have full cataplexy attacks, but rather is drowsy during the day, has prolonged day time naps, more so than any other 1-2 year old Dobe I've met. She also twitches, especially in the lower limbs and will fall asleep in a sitting or even standing position after exciting play, like at the dog park. She will sometimes drop to a recumbent position, but I haven't seen her go lateral. Our vet is recommending treatment with Ritalin. She's a fun loving girl, and doesn't seem too bothered by her symptoms right now, but I've never seen it besides in youtube videos.
I thought I read somewhere that Ritalin was not safe for dogs and did not have the same effect. If I come across the article I will link it for you but I would do a little research before giving it to your dog.


I have a friend who has narcolepsy.. and its pretty funny.
I suffer from Narcolepsy with cataplexy and it can be funny but also pretty annoying;). For a dog who has no responsibility, I could see it as mostly a minor annoyance to them. So the dog is sleepy and needs more naps, its not like they have to go to school, work, drive a car, take care of household chores, etc... the biggest annoyance is cataplexy, but even that will only last a short while, and again, isnt so bad if you have a human to do all your bidding:).

Some things that may help your narcoleptic dog is make sure she has a consistent sleep schedule with scheduled nap time during the day. Also, exercise her in the morning and not later in the day. I know it is supposed to help humans. Personally, the later in the day it gets, the harder it is for me to function so anything that is important, I schedule in the morning. In fact, by about 7 or 8 pm I no longer have the ability to even think or remember simple things, so if you have training you would like to do with your dog, I would suggest figuring out her natural rhythm and trying to work around it.

I wonder if dogs get similar dreaming disturbances like humans?

As far as testing goes, I am not sure its a huge deal. While it can be genetic it can also be caused by trauma (which was my case). Also, a dogs life is cake if it has the right people I cant imagine it effects them that much. I think this is one disease were it would suit the lazy life style of my pups quite nicely.:roflmao:
 

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I thought I read somewhere that Ritalin was not safe for dogs and did not have the same effect. If I come across the article I will link it for you but I would do a little research before giving it to your dog.




I suffer from Narcolepsy with cataplexy and it can be funny but also pretty annoying;). For a dog who has no responsibility, I could see it as mostly a minor annoyance to them. So the dog is sleepy and needs more naps, its not like they have to go to school, work, drive a car, take care of household chores, etc... the biggest annoyance is cataplexy, but even that will only last a short while, and again, isnt so bad if you have a human to do all your bidding:).

Some things that may help your narcoleptic dog is make sure she has a consistent sleep schedule with scheduled nap time during the day. Also, exercise her in the morning and not later in the day. I know it is supposed to help humans. Personally, the later in the day it gets, the harder it is for me to function so anything that is important, I schedule in the morning. In fact, by about 7 or 8 pm I no longer have the ability to even think or remember simple things, so if you have training you would like to do with your dog, I would suggest figuring out her natural rhythm and trying to work around it.

I wonder if dogs get similar dreaming disturbances like humans?

As far as testing goes, I am not sure its a huge deal. While it can be genetic it can also be caused by trauma (which was my case). Also, a dogs life is cake if it has the right people I cant imagine it effects them that much. I think this is one disease were it would suit the lazy life style of my pups quite nicely.:roflmao:
I should have clarified, this dog is not mine, but one in foster, in another home in the rescue I work with. Ritalin was used to see if it incited a neuro change. It did, but was discontinued because her symptoms aren't necessarily problematic. In fact it makes her very calm and gentle for a 1 year old. After working with her on a schedule she is now more awake during the day and actually sleeps though the night, where before she didn't.
 
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