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What is the average cost a breeder will charge? Does a more expensive breeder mean a better dog? What usually does the breeder base his cost on?

Any help is appreciated

Thanks,
Paul
 

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sufferin succotash
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Hello Paul. Thank you for doing your homework. :nicejob:

Typically, the average cost of a well-bred pup from champion/sport titled, health tested (including cardio) parents runs $1500-$2500. This should include the ear cropping as well. I also look for champions in the pedigree (2nd, 3rd generations).

Higher priced dogs do not mean they are better. Some byb's charge upwards of $3000 for their dogs but I wouldn't touch them.

Check out the link in my signature link for a good breeder checklist.
 

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$1500 to $3000 seems to be about average for a Doberman. And no, more money does not necessarily mean a better dog. Things that go into the cost of a puppy/what a breeder charges are: costs of raising a litter, costs of cropping/docking, health tests, etc. There are a lot of things involved. Breeding is not a very cost effective endeavour and most breeders are lucky to break even once the puppies are all sold.

Before looking at how much a dog is going to cost initially, look closer at the breeder themselves and see if they're reputable. You want to see dogs that are titled and worked in some venue (or multiple venues), you want dogs that are health tested (actual tests for heart, thyroid, hips, etc. - not an "ok, this dog is healthy" from the vet), you want dogs that conform to a standard and look like the breed is supposed to, you want a breeder who knows their dogs inside and out and can tell you anything and everything you want to know about their dogs, etc.

There is a lot more to buying a dog than initial price, as I am sure you know. Price is a big factor also, and I think everyone has their own limit there, but you will not find a healthy, well bred Doberman puppy for under $1200 I wouldn't think. And even that's pretty low nowadays.
 

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Got mutt?
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Don't forget, the initial purchase price of the dog is just the beginning. It is the lifetime of upkeep that is the REAL expense. A cheap, poorly puppy with health problems could wind up costing a lot more in the long run than a well-bred pup from health-tested parents.

Just as an example of purchase cost vs upkeep, I've had Ilka almost two years. As a dumped puppy, Ilka was free. I then proceeded to pay $300 for mange treatment. Shots, spaying, tattooing and microchipping was another $600+. Four training classes for her were $400. That's $1300, at the least. Plus throw in another $200 for classes for Lucky, because he forgot all his manners after Ilka came. That's not counting the new crate, or all the food, heartworm pills, flea and tick prevention, collars, leashes, toys, etc. that I've bought since getting her. Yep, she was a bargain, all right. I don't even want to think about what I've spent on Lucky (also a free puppy) over the last 11 years. I can only hope that Ilka will be as healthy as Lucky has been (thank goodness), seeing as how I have no earthly idea about her parents' health.

That list of expenses doesn't even get into things like the cost of listing her with the AKC ($35) so I could show her, entry fees for trials, and travel expenses (the real killer for showing).
 
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the startup cost - what you pay to a breeder - is peanuts compared to the lifetime costs.

our dobe: $1900 new.

five year costs:
- annual vet visits for regular shots etc ~ $100
- sentinel: ~$90 for six month supply
- ripped toenail off - vet visit ~$250
- discovered elevated liver enzymes in pre-neuter blood work: ~$750 so far in repeat testing
- neuter ~$250
- obstruction and endoscopy procedure, incluing barium study, xray , etc ~$4,000
- thyroid diagnosis and lifetime meds: $200 + $200 annually
- diarrhea episodes, vet visit, metronidazole: $300
- attempted to show him with professional handler: ~5,000 (lost count)
- what else..... his crate, toys, food, blankies, covers for couch, his sudsy shampoo, dremel, collars, leashes, snow booties, jackets...
 

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Why is the rum gone?
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Definitely set aside an emergency vet fund for your Dobe. I adopted Griffin, his fee was around $250, and less than six months later he broke the big molar in the back of his mouth. The one with three roots that cost over $700 dollars at the vets to have removed before it could get horrendously infected. And then there was the tumor I had to remove and have biopsied (more vet bills), followed by his stitches getting ripped by my neighbor's GSD (still more bills).

Also count in the fact that this is not the healthiest of breeds, and you could very well be looking at medical related vet bills later in your Doberman's life. They are not cheap dogs to own. Kudos for doing your research ahead of time.
 

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My pup with ears cropped was $1900 but then with shots getting flea and tick stuff, heart worm prevention that was another $375. Plus not to mention all the stuff we had to get for him we've put a lot of money into him but he's so worth it :)
 

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the startup cost - what you pay to a breeder - is peanuts compared to the lifetime costs.

our dobe: $1900 new.

five year costs:
- annual vet visits for regular shots etc ~ $100
- sentinel: ~$90 for six month supply
- ripped toenail off - vet visit ~$250
- discovered elevated liver enzymes in pre-neuter blood work: ~$750 so far in repeat testing
- neuter ~$250
- obstruction and endoscopy procedure, incluing barium study, xray , etc ~$4,000
- thyroid diagnosis and lifetime meds: $200 + $200 annually
- diarrhea episodes, vet visit, metronidazole: $300
- attempted to show him with professional handler: ~5,000 (lost count)
- what else..... his crate, toys, food, blankies, covers for couch, his sudsy shampoo, dremel, collars, leashes, snow booties, jackets...
I thought I had told you children would be expensive........;)
 

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I was a moron and bought a a BYB puppy. She was $800. TO DATE her vaccinations have cost around $100, Bloodwork for testing for vWD and her presurgery was $120, Her crop was $400, and reposting of her hers is $22/week until her ears stand (6 or 7 months old). To her spay will be $400. We also have worm preventative $80 for six month supply. Then theres all the puppy stuff we had to buy (food bowls, two crates, toys, leash, collar, harness.. etc.) These are just routine things... Then, the not so routine- Removing a broken puppy tooth was $250. Then A late night trip to the emergency vet from a stumble down the stairs was close to $800. Thankfully, those two were covered by our pet insurance which is $45/mo. Then theres monthly stuff like her food is around $60/mo and expected to increase with size (obviously). Even further, when shes two, we'll have to make annual visits with a cardiologist to check her for DCM (an always fatal disease Dobermans can have) which is projected to be around $400. Also, I'm going to need to OFA her hips/elbows to make sure she's okay to do things like agility and the search and rescue work we do.

This is NOT a breed you can do for 'cheap', and the cost is even more exaggerated when you don't buy from a reputable breeder.
 
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With my Petey DCM diagnosis at 3 years old, $6000 in vet bills alone, not including top of the line raw foods, 7 different medications 2x each daily, another dozen different vitamins pills 2x each day, buying every toy and treat known to man to spoil him rotten during his final 20 months...and NO REGRETS. Loved him deeply and happy that he was mine for his short life.

Current boy Monty...so far at 2 years old, very inexpensive at the vet. Very healthy boy. He has only been a couple of times. The other boy had issues from day one, even before the DCM our vet bills were a couple of grand.

Dobes can be super expensive in the health department. The original cost is nothing if you end up like I did and get a sick dog. They are the best breed out there, nothing like a Dobe, so we take the good with the bad.
 

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u mad?
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Hello Paul. Thank you for doing your homework. :nicejob:

Typically, the average cost of a well-bred pup from champion/sport titled, health tested (including cardio) parents runs $1500-$2500. This should include the ear cropping as well. I also look for champions in the pedigree (2nd, 3rd generations).

Higher priced dogs do not mean they are better. Some byb's charge upwards of $3000 for their dogs but I wouldn't touch them.

Check out the link in my signature link for a good breeder checklist.
Exactly, this.
 

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I got lucky with a byb dobie right out of high school. I only paid 300 for her, she is akc registered, but aside from that I know absolutely nothing about her bloodlines. It was just someone breeding his two dobies for the first time. I didnt have the money for a 1500 dog and really got lucky that she has had absolutely no health probs. I didnt get her ears done, so that was more I didnt have to spend. The only time I have paid for anything other than just the check up and annual shots was getting her spayed. Now she is 8 1/2 and has recently lost a bunch of weight and I am running into health problems now, but for 8 1/2 years she was good.

I really got lucky. My next dobie will be from researched bloodlines.
 
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We paid $1800 for our pup. We also considered a dog from a breeder who charged $2300. I'd say that's the price range you should look to for a Dobe pup, give or take a few hundred.

Higher cost doesn't equal better...but lower cost - I'd stay away.

Responsible breeders don't make a huge profit on their dogs, if any. They charge so much because of their expenses. They run a lot of tests and go through great efforts to breed dogs that match breed standard with temperament testing and health testing. They also will give their dogs better food even different supplements and they work hard at socializing their dogs as well as they can. They do this for all the pups as well as for the mommies.

Advice on what to look for in a GOOD breeder:

Someone who requires not only a questionnaire but an in-person interview before considering your interest in one of their pups. They want to make sure you know how to take care of a puppy and a dog, particularly a doberman. They want to make sure you will have the proper environment to raise a doberman in, that your whole family is on board etc.

Someone who doesn't breed constantly. A good breeder isn't churning out puppies and so they usually have pups that are spoken for because they'll only breed every couple years or so, if that.

Someone who will let you see the mom.

Someone who can provide you with health records for all the puppies as well as any testing done on the parents for genetic disorders. After all, dogs with a history of health problems that can be genetically traced should not be bred.

Someone who will have you sign a contract. Violation of the contract allows the breeder to repossess the dog. Some things you might see would be an agreement to not breed the dog (unless you're buying a show dog of course) as well as an agreement to spay/neuter your dog. Some breeders who feed their dogs raw only may even require in the contract that YOU continue to feed the dog raw or a dog food that the breeder approves of. You must realize that you are not the sole owner of a dog from a good breeder. You co-own the dog. Some owners will even require that you have your dog in training by a certain age.

A good breeder will also inform you that they require you to give your dog back to them if for some reason you are no longer able to care for it. Dogs from good breeders don't end up in shelters unless some extreme circumstances arise. For example...if the owners died and the family put the dog in a shelter. Even in those situations if the breeder had the dog microchipped, the shelter might find the breeder again.

A good breeder will be available to you either via phone or e-mail or even in person if you live close enough. They will be around to answer your questions, to address your concerns and they will be a resource for you for the duration of your dog's life. We even visited with a breeder who said that they would take the dog if we went on vacation so that the dog didn't have to go to a kennel.

Good breeders get their pups temperament tested and many use that to find a suitable home for each puppy.

Not all good breeders fit all of this criteria but hopefully this gives you a good idea on what to look for in a breeder. We visited about 6 or 7 breeders and found 2 of them that we were interested in buying from.

Hope this helps.
 

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Why a well bred dog is so expensive:
http://www.dobermantalk.com/breeding-breeders/5975-cost-having-litter-puppies.html

bybers or greeders can charge anything, even over $3000 depending on local availability/how ever much they can get away with charging.
Its not always 'you pay for what you get' theres much more to it than that.
Designer dogs around here cost $1-4k and they just throw a random dog with a poodle and breed them. Then they charge outrageous prices for a mutt because people pay it.



Backyard Breeder vs Reputable Breeder
The Ethical Breeder
The Unethical Breeder
I don’t want a show dog; I just want a pet.
How to tell a good breeder website from a bad one
 

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Dobes stole my heart <3
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I was a moron and bought a a BYB puppy. She was $800. TO DATE her vaccinations have cost around $100, Bloodwork for testing for vWD and her presurgery was $120, Her crop was $400, and reposting of her hers is $22/week until her ears stand (6 or 7 months old). To her spay will be $400. We also have worm preventative $80 for six month supply. Then theres all the puppy stuff we had to buy (food bowls, two crates, toys, leash, collar, harness.. etc.) These are just routine things... Then, the not so routine- Removing a broken puppy tooth was $250. Then A late night trip to the emergency vet from a stumble down the stairs was close to $800. Thankfully, those two were covered by our pet insurance which is $45/mo. Then theres monthly stuff like her food is around $60/mo and expected to increase with size (obviously). Even further, when shes two, we'll have to make annual visits with a cardiologist to check her for DCM (an always fatal disease Dobermans can have) which is projected to be around $400. Also, I'm going to need to OFA her hips/elbows to make sure she's okay to do things like agility and the search and rescue work we do.

This is NOT a breed you can do for 'cheap', and the cost is even more exaggerated when you don't buy from a reputable breeder.
$400 for a crop and they CHARGE you to repost the ears every week?? I paid around $350 for our crops and postings were free for as long as it took to stand.
 
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