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I don't have any Z factored dogs here. I would never buy one either personally. But that is just my opinion. Everyone learns from there mistakes. There shouldn't be any reason why you can't do everything you wanted to with him. There are albinos that compete in agility/OB/rally.
 

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dobebug said:
Hey alienex, did you ever look at your puppies registration papers to see if he has a Z in his registration number? You didn't have them with you to look at the beginning of this thread--I wondered if he is actually Z factored (actually it's albino factored--but that's a shortcut discription that gets used regularly).

If he is of normal color (black, red, blue or fawn) you CAN show him in any AKC venues--performance or conformation. Chances are pretty good that you might not want to show him in conformation even though you can. If he is a Z list dog, neutering him is the best thing to do--then you can play with him in obedience, rally, tracking, flyball etc and have a great time there.

P&AD--it's hard to know what you will get in a Z list dog in terms of health. You won't, as someone else already said get the problems that a peculiar to the albinoid dogs BECAUSE they are albinoid; but because all of the Z dogs (as well as those dogs who are albinos--they are Z dogs too) desend from one Dobe bitch (Shebah) there is a ton of incestual breeding--this tends to consolidate the bad genes as well as the good genes and sometimes you have dogs that show up with a lot of health problems that are at least in part genetically caused. There is also some reason to think that some of the temperament problems may be in part hereditary even though the way dogs are raised plays a huge role in the last analysis when it comes to temperament.

It really is a maybe answer....Dobes are inbred enough from the very beginning of the breed, both here and in Europe, that there are a number of hereditary problems that show up in all Dobes and in all breeding lines not just the Z dogs.

I recently read a post from someone who has a Dobe who has been diagnosed with DCM (dilated cardiomyopathy--a heart condition that shows up mostly in Dobes--sometimes vets call it Doberman cardio) who said that she would not be getting another Doberman because of the prospects of having another dog end up with DCM and having to go through the prospects of an early loss of a much loved dog. EVERY breed that I have looked at over the years has a long list of health problems that tend to go along with the breed--some of them are much worse that the three biggies in the Doberman world (cardio, cancer and CVI).

With the dogs I believe in taking each day as it comes--if there are health problems I deal with them as they come along--I could make myself and the dogs miserable speculating about what might happen to them. Enjoy Cedric, learn about the diseases that affect Dobermans, keep an eye out for changes in Cedric's energy level, activity, appetite etc and hope for the best. If you have poodles you know about some of the things that can and do affect poodles. It doesn't happen to every dog in any breed--just know that the possibilities are there.
I just wanted to say that this was a great post dobebug. It is sad that people are put off by the negatives of the breeds, but as you said, it is in all breeds. My standard poodle has PPM's in both eyes and has had them since the day I brought him home. The people I got him from thought that the "stars" in his eyes were cool and wanted to breed him. Granted he has a beautiful pedigree, but he still is not breed worthy and has a HUGE fault hitting the breed. I looked for a long time for a poodle and he was not the one that I wanted. Call it a weak spot for the underdog, but I should have turned the other way and looked for a better dog. Instead, I drove 2 states to pick up an anti-socialized freak. :) But we work on it. And we always watch to make sure that his eyes don't progress. He doesn't see the greatest at distances and always thinks that the neighbors deer statues are real. But people always comment on how unique his eyes are. It is a learning experience for them.
It is hard to watch an animal fall from diseases. But I don't think I could turn away from a loved breed because of it. I just watch my pocket book get emptied out to find the best hope. Whether a z-factored or not, always watch for changes in any animal.

-Thats a nice pedigree by the way. Wish mine looked that nice. ;) Great job with the z-list by the way.
 
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