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Discussion Starter #1
I understand the health benefits by removing a male dogs testicles but i was wondering if any of your noticed a change in your dogs behaviour ..whether it be positive or negative? were they crazy before and it calmed them?..were they easier to train? were they quieter? were they less nervous or more nervous etc? Better behaved in certain situations which they previously didnt deal so well with? :)
 

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Sorry, I'm not much use here, all my males (which is mostly what I've had) have been neutered as soon as I got them...

Harely was a year old when I adopted him, and I got him neutered right away, he is very skiddish and has always been, I attribute that to poor socialization, starvation, and possibly rougher treatment for that first year.

All my other male dogs were neutered younger, b/c they were younger when I got them. So I can't really compare.

Growing up, my dad's GS wasn't ever neutered, and he was highly aggressive (protective), but again, he was trained as a guard dog, and not socialized. So how much of that is the breed, or the training, or not neutering, or keeping as an outside dog, I don't know.

Just recently my mom got her Cavelier King Charles neutered, he was two years old, he had a horrible detestible attitude, completely unlike the breed standard. He was downright vicious when the female came into heat. Give him a bone, and humph- good luck ever getting it away. After being altered, he is still semi violent if the female is in heat and you still will lose a hand if you try to take something away from him! But again, poor training comes into effect, at least for the latter of the two problems. He maybe mellowed a little, but he's had two years to get set into a specific behaviour pattern before being fixed.

Sorry about the book!
 

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Scooby was three when she was neutered because Brian had 'issues' with it. He did have some aggression problems with dogs and people before but he's since lost the additude. I don't know if it was all because of neutering or because I took over his care and taught him some manners. I figure it was a combination of both.
 

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My only male ever is 8 years and has never had ANY aggression problems with people or other dogs and he does not mark the house. I chose not to neuter him for various health reasons which are contrary to what we have been told (and I'll probably get flamed for not doing it but WTH). I have several friends who neutered their male dogs and they have health problems, marking in the house, mounting and aggression. So I did not see any reason to neuter my male. He is the sweetest dog ever, much more forgiving of me when scolded - the females tend to sulk and ignore me, LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies~the reason i asked is when i got Harvey we knew he would immediatly need working on with a Dog behaviouralist ..he was abused etc. Well the guy recommended that we hold of getting him 'done' as it could make him even more of a hermit. He was really depressed, ...not a shred of confidence atall..we had him on Serene_UM for a long time but Thanking my stars has never shown a teeny bit of aggresion. He said the lack/reduction of testosterone could lower his depression even further. He was a great guy and gave very valuable advice towards Harvey and Now a year later he is a completely different dog and im toying with the idea that soon shall be the time to neuter.
He has humped Michael leg the once and has never ever tried it again . He has never marked the house either.

Just wondered how (if it did affect) your dogs personality :)
 

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doberlover said:
My only male ever is 8 years and has never had ANY aggression problems with people or other dogs and he does not mark the house. I chose not to neuter him for various health reasons which are contrary to what we have been told (and I'll probably get flamed for not doing it but WTH). I have several friends who neutered their male dogs and they have health problems, marking in the house, mounting and aggression. So I did not see any reason to neuter my male. He is the sweetest dog ever, much more forgiving of me when scolded - the females tend to sulk and ignore me, LOL.
I thought those were specific reasons why you SHOULD neuter....have I been lied to?
 

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IloveMyDobie31, I found this site, quite by accident http://www.freewebs.com/society_against_neutering/health.htm

I like to review both sides before I make any decision for myslef and my dogs. WHen I got my male I spayed both my females and had problems with them from that day forward, urine leaking, health problems..... This is another touchy subject and everyone has their own opinion. I have to do what I think is right for my dogs and myself. Some people do it, others do not. Some people believe in vaccines others do not. Some people like a certain type of dog food, some people train a certain way, some people rescue and others buy. As long as we are taking care of them to the best of our ability and are doing what we feel is best for them... what else can I say. Not everyone is going to agree but that is why we come here to exchange our thoughts and ideas, put some people's minds at ease when they have gone through the same thing you have and they tell you not to worry.
 

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Doberlover,
Thanks so much for the link! I feel so missinformed! My previous vet (the one who had seen my previous dog his entire life) told us that neutering prevented behaviors such as mounting, and spraying. She also said it was healthier for the dog. I never even knew there really was another acceptable option if you weren't breeding. Now I'm wondering if I should get Apollo neutered :-/ Although, I can say that our previous dog lived almost 15 healthy years after he had the surgery done....
 

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so showing you one website and hearing one persons story makes you change your mind, ilovemydobie? :) if you were going to neuter him and were comfortable with that decision, then i say do it.

my dog was neutered at approx 4 years old, which was right when i adopted him.

i have since spent over 5000 dollars, and he has had 5 separate surgeries, trying to correct what being left intact did to him.

he also had a LOT of aggression, which training and neutering has helped a TON with.

personally, if you are showing and are downright against it, then fine, whatever. but there is no reason for most of the pet population to remain intact. neutering and spaying do have definite health benefits.

and dobelover, dobermans have some of the highest rates of incontinence, whether spayed or intact!
 

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Kim is right about the incontinence, some breeds have a higher incidence of it than others, and Dobermans are one of them. I have Italian Greyhounds, I have had four in total, all females. All were spayed at some point in time, and none became incontinent. On the IG email lists, spay incontinence is almost never discussed, because that breed is not prone to it.

Personally, I am more willing to take the risk of a Doberman bitch suffering fromo spay incontinence(which can be successfully treated in most cases) than I am to have her run the risk of mammary cancer, which is higher if she is not spayed. Spaying also completely removes the risk of uterine or ovarian cancer and the infection of the uterus known as pyometra.

I have to echo what Kim said about that website. Just because someting is written on a website doesn't make it true. I didn't see any scientific or medical references or justifications given for the opinions stated there. Also some of the things they said on that page simply weren't true, such as that false pregnancies are rare in dogs, they are in fact, quite common in dogs, and that neutered animals have trouble breathing because their chests are so narrow! That's hogwash. Think about oxen; what do you think they are? They are neutered male cattle. Yet they have broad chests and manage to do a full days' work. Most male racehorses are neutered, yet manage to compete in a demanding athletic sport.

I have spayed or neutered most of my pets at various ages. I have never yet had even one of them, whether dog or cat, male or female, become overweight as a result. My male Doberman is now 12 years old, he was neutered when he was 9 because he was having surgery for something else, he was never going to be bred, and he was hyper so I hoped maybe it would calm him down in some areas. The surgery he was having was for the removal of malignant melanomas, by the way, so he contracted cancer while intact, not that I think being intact or neutered has anything to do with it. The only change I have seen in him since he was neutered is that he has stopped humping the female IGs and the male cat. While I hoped for more positive changes, just that one was nice. He does not mark in the house, he has not become aggressive.

That website linked to appears to be a British site, they have a different mindset in the UK about spay/neuter, they are less likely to do it already than we here in the US are. Their stated goal is to make spaying/neutering completely illegal unless it is required to save the life of an animal. Given the ignorance of many pet owners I think we all know that would lead to even more surplus dogs and cats being born than we have now, and we have way too many now.

They offer the alternative of vasectomies and tubal ligation. The problem with those is that for the males a vasectomy won't reduce testosterone, so if there is an aggression problem there is no change it will help. If there is no aggression problem, then it's a moot point. But a vasectomy is more involved to do, I think, than a neuter.

A tubal ligation would stop a bitch from becoming pregnant, but wouldn't be of any help at all in the health area, as she would still be at risk from the same diseases as a fertile bitch.

I've lived with in-season bitches before, and I don't like it. If an animal is not a breeding animal I don't see any reason to require the owner or the pet to live thru seasons for the animal's whole life. It's messy for the owner, it restricts the animal's lifetstyle for about six weeks of every year. If you're showing a bitch in obedience you can't show her when she's in season, if you have unneutered males, and this site wants to require that both your males and your females be intact, you'll have to keep them separated while the bitch is in season. I've done that too, and it's extremely nerve wracking. Why do it if you're not going to breed the pet?

I haven't read the entire site yet, but I did glance at some other pages. They also have a page opposing tail docking. They didn't mention ear cropping, but that is probably because they are in the UK, where it is already illegal.
 

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For the average owner(mainly the ones that think any unfixed dog is a way to make money when there neighbor wants to breed fluffy) it is much better to neuter just because it is not easy to keep your dogs apart and one accident is not just forgiveable. Two of mine are fixed,two are not. I never would have fixed byron till at least two anyway,I wanted him to fill out first(which supposedly doens't matter) but he had a lump removed and reacted so bad to the anesthesia I didn't want to risk it again. But Our female corgi was also never fixed and went she goes into heat it is hell living in this house! I want her fixed but she is six now and my mom is worried she wouldn't make it through. We would have fixed her earlier but the agreement when we got her was that her original owner got to breed her. While that never happened but we just haven't gotten her fixed yet. I really need to get it done but I honsetly don't have the time to sit home and watch her. Maybe on my christmas break.
 

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Six isn't that old. Your vet can do pre-surgery bloodwork to see if her liver and ohter organs are functioning normally, and use the newest anesthesias which clear the liver quickly.

One of my Italian Greyhounds had major surgery when she was 13 years old to remove an adrenal gland that had a large tumor on it, and she was back home within a day or two, she came thru it with flying colors, and it was much more major than a spay, it had to be done at a specialist hospital with two surgeons and one internist plus techs on duty. Of course that was an absolutely necessary operation, but a healthy six year old dog should be spayable.

If you don't spay her, the odds are good that eventually she will get pyometra, or mammary tumors, or uterine or ovarian cancer and then she will have to be spayed anyway, and it will be much more difficult surgery than it would when she was younger and healthier. My Doberman was neutered when he was 9 and he had no problems, and I spayed a Doberman bitch when she was 9, and she had no problems with the surgery.
 

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My young dogs have all been spayed/neutured at 6mos. No change in behavior one way or the other. My current 2.5yr. rescue was neutured at 9mos. when I got him. He was hyper then and still is. I also, might mention that I have never had an incontinence problem with any of my females, except for the one I have now that I just adopted 2mos. ago. She was neutured at 2yrs. and became incontinent. This is my personal experience. Of course leaving a male intact can cause testicular cancer in later years and mammary cancer in the females in later years.
 
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