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Jason said:
I make it a rule that once I give food to Ajax (my dog) I do not take it back. I make him earn the food with some simple obedience but once he gets it, it is his till he is done.

In this scenario I would start with teaching the dog to "out" the bone/toy. once outted you can safely remove the bone/toy from his grasp. The out command is a great command and one that EVERYONE should use with their dogs. You can teach it by giving the dog a bone/toy then then offering the dog a really tastey treat and when the dog spits out the original bone or toy you pop the treat in his mouth and say "out" then praise like he just cured cancer. This does two things it teaches the dog that you are a fair leader and that when he complies with a command that might conflict with his desire he gets a really great reward. Eventually with lots of praise and practice no treat will be needed and your command +praise will be more than enough.

Also to make him feel better about keeping his food, feed him in his kennel/crate, this removes the potential for guarding while also helping him bond with his crate.

This is not a food guarding issue. The dog was repeatedly dropping the bone. He was more preocupied with the fussing the two persons were doing over him, to the point the bone was of absolutely no priority. Again, not a posessiveness issue. Sounds more like an insecure dog with issues of fear and mistrust.

Airbrush, you've only had him for 3 weeks. That's nothing. He is just barely beginning to settle in. Especially if he is not a socially well adjusted dog, you have to give him extra time.

I understand how you feel about the bite, but if you trully feel this dog has a great personality give him another chance. From the sounds of it, you have put him in a situation (even if unknowingly) where he felt cornered and reacted out of fear. This doesn't mean you can't trust him. It means he doesn't trust you. Do consider working with a professional behaviourist. This might just be a rocky start to a wonderful bond. The shy ones like this can be hard to get through to but once you do they will bond with you like no other.
 
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