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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm a new Doberman mom hoping to get a simple answer to what seems complicated.....

If I'm feeding a 26% protein formula. Will my girl be getting too much protein if I feed 4 cups vs the recommended 2.5 cups? OR as long as the protein she gets is 26% of the total food fed, we'll maintain the right amount of protein? Otherwise, with Dobermans being fed 25% - 35%+ more than the label suggests, they would all be getting too much protein...

Does anyone have a nutritionist referral? :) I'm feeding a combination of foods and had some questions about that too...

Thanks!
Bonnie


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MeadowCat--do you have any neutritionists on tap?

Bonnieg--is your new girl a puppy?--How old? And are you comparing puppy foods, large breed puppy foods, or adult foods?

I don't feed puppy food and personally I think food B's protein % is too high if your girl is a puppy. I'm not terribly inclined to mix foods--partly because not all protein is created equal and sometimes I know that one brand isn't just counting meat protein but is adding in a lot of vegetable protein you can't really get a clear picture of exactly what your dog is getting.

I don't have an on tap nutritionist any more (moved out of her area) but MeadowCat may know someone. Or sometimes you can find one by trying Google. Or sometimes you can go to the source of the food--the manufacturer--and if they do use nutritionist when formulation foods (some brands do and some brands don't--I know that Purina does and I'm pretty sure that both Royal Canin and Eukanuba do.)

(About not feeding puppy food--I feed whatever the breeder was feeding for about a month--even if I think it's a garbage food--after that I switch to the food I normally feed everyone--and only change from that if there is a medical reason that shows up--and I feed either adult of all life stages--no puppy food except for that first month if the breeder was feeding a puppy food).

dobebug
 

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Bonnie - to address your first question, the protein in food is calculated on a percentage basis. That is, the protein in the food is a percentage of each cup fed. You can't alter the amount of protein by feeding more or fewer cups of food. It's how the food is constructed. Otherwise, the dogs who are smaller (and thus, fed less) would be getting less of everything than dogs who are larger (those dogs are supposed to be fed more, based on their weight/size).

I'm not sure that you are correct in your assumption that if you "add" the two foods together you will get new calculations of protein/fat/etc. by simply adding the two foods together and averaging them. That's a more complex question that I would ask a board certified nutritionist if I was worried about protein levels. While I know plenty of people who feed multiple foods, most of them are feeding adult dogs. If it were me, I'd just decide on a food for a puppy, or a rotation of foods, that met all my criteria individually. Or, I'd set up a consult with a board certified nutritionist if I had specific concerns. You can search for them here: HOME

Again, that's just me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
MeadowCat--do you have any neutritionists on tap?

Bonnieg--is your new girl a puppy?--How old? And are you comparing puppy foods, large breed puppy foods, or adult foods?

I don't feed puppy food and personally I think food B's protein % is too high if your girl is a puppy. I'm not terribly inclined to mix foods--partly because not all protein is created equal and sometimes I know that one brand isn't just counting meat protein but is adding in a lot of vegetable protein you can't really get a clear picture of exactly what your dog is getting.

I don't have an on tap nutritionist any more (moved out of her area) but MeadowCat may know someone. Or sometimes you can find one by trying Google. Or sometimes you can go to the source of the food--the manufacturer--and if they do use nutritionist when formulation foods (some brands do and some brands don't--I know that Purina does and I'm pretty sure that both Royal Canin and Eukanuba do.)

(About not feeding puppy food--I feed whatever the breeder was feeding for about a month--even if I think it's a garbage food--after that I switch to the food I normally feed everyone--and only change from that if there is a medical reason that shows up--and I feed either adult of all life stages--no puppy food except for that first month if the breeder was feeding a puppy food).

dobebug
Thank you for your advice and direction! Kita is 5 months old. We are so excited to finally have her home and want to make sure we have her on a good foundation.

The reason I'm mixing is that I couldn't find what I was looking for in one food. But I might have found one today Nulo Medalseries Ancient Grains with Salmon, Turkey, Chicken & Haddock. Kita is currently on Wellness Whitefish and Orijen Puppy to stay at around 26% high bioavailable proteins. I'm having success with fish and multiple meat proteins that I like for the different amino acids. Keeping a good calcium/phosphorus level plus healthy grains, low starch, and trying to stay away from peas, potatoes, corn, or soy definitely has limited the options...
 

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I really like the Tufts University Clinical Nutrition Service Blog. They have some very excellent articles (for example, how to pick your dog's food: Pet Food Decisions: How Do You Pick Your Pet’s Food?). There is so much misinformation online about dog food from uneducated sources. It's amazing to see how many people online will start up a website to recommend dog foods or give nutrition advice with zero credentials.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Bonnie - to address your first question, the protein in food is calculated on a percentage basis. That is, the protein in the food is a percentage of each cup fed. You can't alter the amount of protein by feeding more or fewer cups of food. It's how the food is constructed. Otherwise, the dogs who are smaller (and thus, fed less) would be getting less of everything than dogs who are larger (those dogs are supposed to be fed more, based on their weight/size).

I'm not sure that you are correct in your assumption that if you "add" the two foods together you will get new calculations of protein/fat/etc. by simply adding the two foods together and averaging them. That's a more complex question that I would ask a board certified nutritionist if I was worried about protein levels. While I know plenty of people who feed multiple foods, most of them are feeding adult dogs. If it were me, I'd just decide on a food for a puppy, or a rotation of foods, that met all my criteria individually. Or, I'd set up a consult with a board certified nutritionist if I had specific concerns. You can search for them here: HOME

Again, that's just me.
Thank you for the nutritionist link! I appreciate it. That is what I'm worried about, adding the 2 foods but I am using a great calculator that adds percentages with the allowance of different sample groups so if less is fed of one then the other, it calculates that too. But I'm definitely looking forward to talking to a nutritionist since the quantity and calories etc are very confusing. I might have found one formula that will include the proteins and all the other goals I am trying to achieve - so no more mixing ;)

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I really like the Tufts University Clinical Nutrition Service Blog. They have some very excellent articles (for example, how to pick your dog's food: Pet Food Decisions: How Do You Pick Your Pet’s Food?). There is so much misinformation online about dog food from uneducated sources. It's amazing to see how many people online will start up a website to recommend dog foods or give nutrition advice with zero credentials.
Thank you so much for the Tufts Nutritional service referral!! I look forward to digging in!! :) I'm finding the same concerns with the review sites that recommend foods that are questionable with lots of "best" reviews with ingredients that I think most would agree are not best picks for 1st ingredients like corn, and other low-quality starchy carbs. I'm starting to feel less confidence and wondering if most of them are just affiliate-type relationships that generate income through click-throughs.....
 

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Hi, Bonnieg, i know exactly what you mean and the short answer is yes.....and no. Some things in excess will be passed undigested, other things like calcium absorbtion is not controlled and the more eaten the more absorbed.
You will see lots of info about feeding right amount of calcium, protein etc etc......but then you will also see folk saying they feed according to appearence, not food guidelines.
Most of the big dog breed foods talk about not feeding too much of this or that otherwise it can cause bone/growth issues, but this only works if you feed the recommended amounts. Feed double the food and you give double the calcium for example.
You will also find foods give significantly different recommended amounts even though very similar composition and kcal/g. - for example Royal canin v pro plan Large breed.
In short i would not worry about it too much, try to stick to the ca/phos ratio and use a good quality food and watch growth/weight.
 
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