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Alright so my baby girl is turning 1 tomorrow and recently I broke up with my boyfriend of 5 years to date a new guy who is just well, a better fit for my life. Now the problem is Rogue does not like anyone touching me, even my ex whom she had grown up around would get her biggest warning bark and charge if he so much as picked me up. Now this new guy is extremely sweet to her and he's doing his best to win her over but she still gets very annoyed with him being too close to me.

As it is I have always been my dog's main provider giving her all the love, food, treats, training, and exercise that she needs where as my ex was all but too strict with her. Now I know you need a stern hand when dealing with a dobie but I never approved of how he would go about doing so, I mean seriously one time she started to follow me out the door and he grabbed her by the scruff of the neck and threw her back she yelped and I flipped out. This behavior towards my dog is also an influence on why we broke up because I will admit that I am as protective as Rogue is as she is towards me and no one ever hurts my pets, end of story. On that note she often shys away from strange men and I'm not sure if she feels that they make me uncomfortable or if it's because she's afraid of them due to how rough the ex was with her. This is most noticeable because with women and other dogs she is will be all to happy to say hi and greet them with a wagging nub and a polite sit.

Alrighty so you all know this is what I've...we've, currently been doing to help remedy the situation- the new bf has started feeding her once a day, he takes her for runs, always tries to calmly show her that he isn't going to hurt me, started attending our CGC training session, and engages her in play. Oh and now I have to gush because I find this adorable, when I go out he takes her to her favorite pet store to buy her bullysticks and treats, yea he's just that nice. As for me personally, I try to relax when strange men approach us to let Rogue know that everything will be ok and whenever I'm with my bf I give her some kind of treat to try and preoccupy her mind. Now I'd be happy to put her in the yard but we don't have one until July so right now the only way I can keep her from doing her protective act is to shut the bedroom door which causes her to stand outside barking and paw slamming.

Last note, so you know her exact behavior towards the bf...her means of protection is not outwardly aggressive but more of a warning which I don't want to go any further. But one time we were doing the cuddly thing watching a movie and she starts barking at him, then jumped on top him paws aimed to grab his arms and proceeded to lick him into submission in order to keep his hands off me. My trainer suggested he drop treats every time he hugged me but that hasn't been working, she will ignore them in order to keep an eye on what he's going to do to me.
 

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That's not protection, that's possession IMO. When you and your BF are doing something harmless and he reacts in a negative way, you correct it.

Now this doesn't mean a collar correction and shun him to the corner, after all, you are supposed to be family, and be together.

Chase had the beginning signs of possession over me (on guard, puffing the lips and making eye contact, getting in between him and I). I do not tolerate this. So every time he tried to control the situation I sternly say 'no.' make him sit, and stay. Once he has calmed down, I ask him to join our activity, and he happily wags his way to us. I only had to tell him off twice.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Makes sense thank you DogsRLife, it does sound like she may just be resource guarding me since well I do provide her with everything. I will try and correct this behavior before she even gets to the first bark and see what happens.
 

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If it were me, I'd hire a good trainer ASAP because this CAN be a very dangerous situation (or can turn into one).

Since there is nothing to protect you from, I would not call it protection. More like possession or resource guarding.
 

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Youve gotten good answers. I was going to ask you, who runs the household anyway, you or the dog? Dont allow her to act possessive towards you. Just remember, she looks to you for guidence and if you dont fulfill that roll, she feels like she has to make those decisions and that is not fair to her./////Kudos to your new boyfriend for being so understanding and making such a great effort with her. Him taking her for fun times is the best thing, besides feeding and, obedience lessons, he can do. I would put her in her crate for those "personal" bedtimes. If you dont have one, get one.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
First off thank you for all your advice guys and clarifying that this behavior isn't protection but more possessiveness. Tomorrow we are meeting with our trainer who has worked with dobies for 20 years so I will be sure to ask her for further advice on how to deal with the situation.

From the looks of it I just need to be a lot more assertive with her and make it clear that she does not own me, I own her, and this behavior is completely inappropriate. As for the crate I do own one and will try putting her in it at bedtime :)

Thanks again all, you are always so helpful and lovely!
 

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Let me explain differently. When your girl exhibits possessiveness, cheerfully(cheerfully because you dont want to bully her, just cue her) say "Too bad", no other talking, and remove her from your presence. Be it behind a baby gate or in a crate for a couple of minutes. Release and go back to snuggling say. When she starts the behavior, "Too bad" and crate again for another couple of minutes. It shouldnt take her long to realize acting possessive gets her removed from you. Thats horrible to a dog. You have to reshape her mind. Instead of you giving her the treat to distract her, let the boy friend do that. ///// Buy The Power of Positive Dog Training by Pat Miller. Amazon has it. Your problem is on pg 224.:) Also buy, The Other End of the Leash by Patricia McConnell, PhD, and On Talking Terms with Dogs: Calming Signals by Turid Rugaas. I should get a commission on these books!:) Very nice to know your trainer uses positive methods.
 

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You should get a commission,
I bought these after recmmendation from here on another thread!
Great books they really do help.. But i think youv done the right
Thing with getting a trainer. Just make sure its a not a man handled
Trainer as i had experiences with my dog not liking men, and the man
Made it worse acting rough to be more "assertive",
Thats my expierence tho 20years with dobes sounds like he knows what
His doing mind more than me so :)
Good luck !


:)
 

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Larka - you have some advise to consider I would like to suggest that first if your remove her she won't learn proper behavior. Dogs don't really understand time outs. I would relax and continue to hold one another and both of you kinda play with her so she sees it is OK and nothing to be concerned about. If she escalates you can also together back her up a little and say no - settle down. But if you both stand together as you address her she will get the picture that you are together - if you step aside from each other she sees she won.

I am not for the dropping treats either - you could ask her to sit and then treat for actually doing something positive and her resonding. For a high drive dog that is kinda a useless jester. Have the BF do all the walking and feeding her for a while.

To add: Dobermans are not GR - they don't just jump at a new person with open arms and they shouldn't this would be against breed type.

If you guys can stay calm and not get overly concerned about it but address it in a playful fun way she will be able to relax too. If you become concerned then she will also.

If you feel you can't handle it then find a good trainer and work with them.
 

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Are you kidding me?!? I know this works. Parker understood what behavior was getting him time outs at 7 months of age! By the end of the third two minute time out, he was a brand new teenager!!! He decided ignoring Mom and garbage diving wasnt worth it. Seriously, everyone, get this image....he is standing over the kitchen garbage, LOOKING AT ME!! I am saying "No! No!" He dives in! Gets put in timeout. We go thru this same ritual three times. By the end of the third timeout, Parker was a brand new boy. Teenagers!!! Two minutes is a long time away from Mom. You may have to repeat another day, just like all training. You can also extend the time away, but not more than 5 minutes. Negative punishment is removing from the "good things" of you, freedom, where the action is, whether you remove the dog or yourself. Just wish I had used all positive training methods.///// OP, her behavior is pretty set, so it is probably going to take some time. I am glad you have a trainer, also.You cant beat being there to observe
 

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Some people can easily make time outs work well and others use the direct approach well...to curb an unwanted behavior.
- one technique is not better than the other / maybe more of a individual handler thing preference
What ever works best...for each / diff. strokes 4 diff. folks.

Personally, I never used time outs &/or treats / problems are dealt with head on...thru. positive correction, if needed.
For the OP:
I would train the dobe on the couch, poistioning her beside your BF with you on the other side.
Don't let the dog get on Mom's side (until problem solved) or between Mom and BF, in the beginning.
- have your BF cuddle you with one arm while petting the dog with the other
Then Rogue doesn't feel ignored, but rather more involved in the family pack unit.
 
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