Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well just got back from vets the lil blue pups have Cradle Cap.... the reds n blacks dont have it just the blues poor babies..... gave me some antiiotic for it (same pink stuff they give babies) any other ideas as to what i can do for them? :help_up_2
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,772 Posts
Oh poor babies.. Hope they are all doing great! Have you tried some baby oil or olive oil on they..I know that in babies you massage in baby oil at night and put them to bed, In the morning give them a bath and lightly scrub the heads to remove the cradle cap.. Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,854 Posts
what is cradle crap?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
421 Posts
I was laughing at that earlier but thought that was what it was called:haha:


Is that why blues are supposed to be on all the vitamins and special diet?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,854 Posts
Lexus said:
:3dbiggrin Cradle CAP Kim! Not crap! I don't know exactly what it is, just wanted to rib you a little in good humor!

:haha:

oops! freudian?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,854 Posts
on a serious note- its known that blues have skin problems and such (as dilutes) but ive never heard of them getting it so young- and it being only the blues, that would seem pretty significant. what kind of meds did the vet put them on?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,589 Posts
doberkim said:
on a serious note- its known that blues have skin problems and such (as dilutes) but ive never heard of them getting it so young- and it being only the blues, that would seem pretty significant. what kind of meds did the vet put them on?
Seriously. I hope it isn't something that will plague them throughout their lives.... Maybe not cradle cap per say, but skin problems in general.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,169 Posts
Jordan had cradle cap when she was about 3 months... Our Ped. told us that it was basically just dry skin (mentioned some sort of oil producing gland) that some babies get due to the quick growth of the scalp and shedding skin cells. He had us put baby oil on it to soften the dry skin and then wipe off... Was cleared up in a matter of days and never came back... To be honest though I've never heard of it in pups and am not sure if it's the same thing... I do wonder if this is an indication of the skin problems these guys may face in the future though...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,854 Posts
that was what my question was - ive never heard of it in dogs either, and it doesnt look like that (and why would only the blues get it?)...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,169 Posts
Since I really don't feel like doing homework right now (Henry Fielding is very witty and fun to read but he just really ticked me off yesterday...) I think I'll do a little research on this :)

What we are referring to as cradle cap in humans is seborrheic dermatitis.
"This condition is most common in three age groups — infancy when it’s called “cradle cap,” middle age, and the elderly. Cradle cap usually clears without treatment by age 8 to 12 months. In some infants, seborrheic dermatitis may develop only in the diaper area where it could be confused with other forms of diaper rash. When seborrheic dermatitis develops at other ages it can come and go. Seborrheic dermatitis may be seasonally aggravated particularly in northern climates; it is common in people with oily skin or hair, and may be seen with acne or psoriasis. A yeast-like organism may be involved in causing seborrheic dermatitis."
taken from the American Academy of Dermatology webite....

So finding info on human dermatology was considerably easier than that of canine; however, here is what I found on sebborhea in dogs.

WHAT IS SEBORRHEA?

Seborrhea is a common canine skin disease that is noncontagious. It is similar to, but usually more severe than human dandruff. We see two major types of seborrhea in the dog. The term "Seborrhea sicca" is used to describe the form in which dry scaling is the major clinical sign. If the predominant problem is greasy crusting, the term "Seborrhea oleosa" is used. If localized areas of reddening or inflammation of the skin are present, your veterinarian may use the term "Seborrheic dermatitis". Either localized or generalized hair loss may be seen with either form of the disease. Most animals with either type of seborrhea have a dry, dull, disheveled coat. Itching, sometimes quite severe, may be seen with canine seborrhea.

WHAT CAUSES SEBORRHEA?

Technically, it is believed that seborrhea is caused by a defect in the manner in which cells in the skin mature as they form the dead, protective outer layer. A defect in the production of sebum (an oily material that lubricates the skin) by the sebaceous glands may also play an important role in the development of this disease.

In some dogs, seborrhea is believed to be a hereditary disease. In many cases of "Seborrhea sicca" seen in German shepherds, Irish setters, Laborador retrievers and Dobermans, the disease is probably inherited. Other breeds such as cocker spaniels and West Highland white terriers more commonly have the crusty, greasy form of seborrhea termed "Seborrhea oleosa".

In addition to the hereditary form, other dogs may have seborrhea due to an underactive thyroid gland, other hormonal problems, a fat deficient diet, digestive problems or allergy. More localized seborrhea may also be seen secondary to skin parasites, fungal infection, bacterial infection or allergy.

HOW LONG DOES SEBORRHEA LAST?

Fortunately, seborrhea is very rarely a life-threatening disease. Unfortunately however, unless your veterinarian has determined an underlying cause for the seborrhea, you and your veterinarian must treat your dog with control, rather than a complete cure, as your long term goal. Most cases of seborrhea will respond to proper therapy, but therapy must be continued to maintain control over the disease. The degree of control achieved varies considerably from dog to dog. Most dogs with seborrhea will need more skin care than other dogs but are still able to lead normal lives.

WHAT COMPLICATIONS SHOULD I WATCH OUT FOR?

Some dogs with chronic seborrhea seem to develop bacterial infections of the skin (pyoderma) more frequently than other dogs. If your dog seems to be licking or scratching at any particular area of its body such as the groin, you should examine the area carefully for pustules (pimples, "whiteheads"). You should then take your dog back to your veterinarian if anything abnormal is seen.

WHAT CAN I EXPECT FROM TREATMENT?

Unfortunately, there is no "magic cure" for seborrhea. Instead, you and your veterinarian must work out a program that is helpful to your dog within your own individual time constraints.

WHAT TYPE OF TREATMENT WILL MY VETERINARIAN RECOMMEND?

Antiseborrheic shampoos are the most important ingredient in the successful management of seborrhea. While there is no one "perfect shampoo", certain products have been shown to be more frequently effective. Generally, the dog is shampooed regularly either at home or at a veterinary hospital. Since you are attempting to clean the skin, haircoat and the hair follicles, it is extremely important to leave the lather on your dog for at least 10 minutes. Thorough rinsing is then necessary to avoid irritation. The frequency of bathing should be decided by your veterinarian on an individual basis.

Emollient rinses may be helpful following shampooing in dry flaky types of seborrhea (Seborrhea sicca). These products act as an artificial sebum to "normalize" the coat.

A good balanced diet with proper fat content is very important in the management of seborrhea. Your veterinarian may wish to completely change your dog's diet or simply supplement it.

Paradoxically, fat supplementation seems to be equally beneficial in all types of seborrhea. Both saturated (animal) fat and polyunsaturated (vegetable) fat are added gradually to the diet so as not to cause diarrhea.

http://www.nhahonline.com/k9dermatology.htm#seborhea
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,589 Posts
Excellant information Tracy! I guess you didn't feel like homework! So I gather from all this, that it is something that may (and likely at that) affect them through their life....

Tracyinva-how are the pups doing now?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Just caught this thread, Sasha has this and has since we got her. Our vet told us she will probably either have to grow out of it or it will never go away i bathe her with an oatmeal shampoo and conditioner once every 2 weeks and it helps alot plus i have started giving her olive oil with her food once a week and that helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Could also be ichthyosis, a genetic disorder. Here's some info: Dogs | Foundation for Ichthyosis & Related Skin Types (FIRST)

There are a places parent dogs can be tested prior to breeding to help mitigate -- Optigen and Paw Print Genetics are a couple I can think of offhand.

I realize this is an old thread. Just comes up high on the search for cradle cap in puppies and many people still don't understand what it's about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,455 Posts
Even though it's a really old thread--Kim asked what the med was that was given and if it was pink liquid and what's given to kids it was probably Keflex (Cephalexin--liquid form).
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top