Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently I've heard a lot about copper toxicity leading to hepatitis. Looking online and through archives here I've read through a few posts about foods that they consider to be too high in copper.

I have also seen the page that ranks the copper levels in most dog foods but without the context they all just look like numbers (save the extreme examples).

Can anyone provide what they feel is a safe range for copper levels?

Thanks!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is kind of a hard one to call. Dogs who don't have a genetic predisposition to copper storage problems can eat pretty much any food with any copper content with no problems.
I thought that the genetic predisposition to copper sensitivity was only identifiable in the Bedlington Terrier. Currently there are no similar tests for other breeds.

It kinda seems that one wouldnt know their dog had copper storage problems until it appeared in bloodwork...which may be too late.
 

·
Sea Hag
Joined
·
12,933 Posts
I thought that the genetic predisposition to copper sensitivity was only identifiable in the Bedlington Terrier. Currently there are no similar tests for other breeds.

It kinda seems that one wouldnt know their dog had copper storage problems until it appeared in bloodwork...which may be too late.
Just because a dna test doesn't exist for a disorder in a specific breed doesn't mean the problem is non existant in that breed, or that the problem isn't genetic in origin. DCM is a good example. Another example is vWD-it's been identified in dozens and dozens of breeds, but there's currently only dna tests available for a small handful of those breeds.

There's a dna test for bedlingtons that's a linked marker test..that means they're testing for a marker that frequently occurs in bedlingtons who have copper toxicosis, probably located near the marker that actually causes CT.

Prior to this linked marker test, bedlingtons were tested for CT by means of liver biopsy. That remains the only way to test for copper acumulation in other breeds who have diseases that can cause copper storage problems. But again, if the dog isn't genetically predisposed to have copper storage problems, the copper content in dog food isn't ever an issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ok, I see. Thank you very much for shedding light on this.

I think my sources of information (various people/blogs) warning about having copper in food might have been riding the fear train. The overall message conveyed was to be extra cognizant of the copper levels in the food you feed and make sure they are in the "safe range" (whatever that is) otherwise it will lead to copper toxicity and hepatitis. I see now that this is not always the case.

Which leads me to another question: how would one know if their dog was genetically predispositioned to copper storage issues? Since this is not something that is as avidly discussed with ones breeder such as things like DCM and vWD would be I doubt most owners would have access to the lineage history on this. Would this be something that routine blood work would pick up?

Thanks again!
 

·
Sea Hag
Joined
·
12,933 Posts
Which leads me to another question: how would one know if their dog was genetically predispositioned to copper storage issues? Since this is not something that is as avidly discussed with ones breeder such as things like DCM and vWD would be I doubt most owners would have access to the lineage history on this. Would this be something that routine blood work would pick up?

Thanks again!
If I were looking for a puppy, I'd definitely ask about liver problems in the family group along with DCM, etc. It's something that *should* be discussed with one's breeder.

Annual bloodwork is always a good thing, and it could pick up a rise in liver enzymes early. This bloodwork wouldn't actually show you copper level, but a rise in liver enzymes could suggest a liver problem was possibly developing. Definitely would be a sign that further investigation has to be done.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top