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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey there! I decided a few months ago that I am ready to get a puppy and have been researching breeds for quite a while. Initially I was considering a great dane because I always had them growing up & absolutely love the breed, but I really think a doberman is perfectly suited for me! I love how affectionate, loyal, and intelligent they are. I definitely want a dog who will protect me as I go on a lot of hikes and runs alone. My only concern is the fact that my roommates and I are college-aged, so we like to have get-togethers at our house and can have a lot of people and other dogs coming through our house at times. I'd like to be able to bring her over to my friends' houses as well and pretty much everywhere I go. Anyways, would this be too much for a doberman to handle? I know they can be territorial, or would this be a non-issue with proper socialization and training? She would be extensively socialized as a puppy, and I am very confident and experienced in training and handling large dogs. I'd love to hear any feedback! Cheers!
 

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Bad Wolf
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Welcome to the forum!

I am college aged. I live with my boyfriend and our mini-zoo. I think your lifestyle would do great with a doberman...but they are not labs. When I have 2-4 people over the dogs stay out and get loved on. They have lots of room to lay alone and the guests don't bother them on their beds. More than that and the dogs get a peanut butter hoof in their crates. Those visits are so infrequent I can count on one hand since I've gotten Shenzi 2 years ago.

Get your pup from a reputable breeder. I did and the support I have gotten is amazing. The breeder will match the best pup to your circumstances, do the ear cropping for you, and basically give you the best start possible with the new little guy.

Go to training. Even a group class. This will make your pup a model citizen, answers any questions you have, and keep you on your way.

Good luck!
 
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A well bred (conformation and temperament), socialized, and trained Doberman knows the difference between friends, friendly strangers, and not so nice people. They will be territorial when needed.

If you take your time, and look for a reputable breeder, there will be a Doberman pup best suited to your lifestyle :)
 

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Dober-DERP
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Just remember if you get a puppy that you may be getting up several times throughout the night to let them out to pee (Just like a baby). Having to get up through the night will disrupt your sleep for a few weeks until they sleep through the night.

Also with a puppy, they are a baby, so extended periods away from home aren't a good idea. I'm not saying you will, but most people who are collage-age like to go out and party ect.

Also make sure you read up on ear-posting if your going to crop your dobe's ears.

*Edit* Well-bred doesnt just mean that they are CKC/AKC registered either...you'll need to look back at bloodlines, meet the parents. Purebred doesnt mean well tempered and often the dogs you see on kijiji/craigslist are from people who got a Dobie who was unregistered and bred them to another unregistered dog, thus you'd have no idea on the dogs "family history" or if they where inbred.


PLEASE DON'T PURCHASE FROM A BYB
(Back yard breeder)
 

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Personally, I think a rescue Doberman is right up your alley. You can find one that is mature(so you can instantly go on runs with), and that acts like a lab and is bomb-proof with being around a lot of people and dogs. Dobes are prone to same-sex aggression. Speutering is not a magical fix, and you can do all the socialization in the world and still have a Doberman that exhibits levels of dog intolerance as they come into maturity.

I am very social with my Dobe and he is out in public a lot, around people of all ages. However, he is able to differentiate between friend and foe. This generally comes natural to them if you bring them up and socialize them right.


Where are you located?
 

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Personally, I think a rescue Doberman is right up your alley. You can find one that is mature(so you can instantly go on runs with), and that acts like a lab and is bomb-proof with being around a lot of people and dogs. Dobes are prone to same-sex aggression. Speutering is not a magical fix, and you can do all the socialization in the world and still have a Doberman that exhibits levels of dog intolerance as they come into maturity.

I am very social with my Dobe and he is out in public a lot, around people of all ages. However, he is able to differentiate between friend and foe. This generally comes natural to them if you bring them up and socialize them right.


Where are you located?

I agree 100%. I would look into adoption first.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hey everybody! Thanks for all of your responses! I have definitely considered getting a rescue. I live in North Carolina, and I know there are a lot of awesome rescues in this state. I really want to get a puppy so I can raise and train my dog the way I want to, so that would be the only thing keeping me from getting a rescue. However, I know you can often times find puppies in need, so I will definitely keep my eye on those NC rescues! Could anybody recommend a good, reputable breeder in North Carolina though? I live in western NC up in the mountains, but I definitely don't mind travelling, so recommendations for breeders in Tennessee, South Carolina, Georgia, etc. would also be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
 

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Hey everybody! Thanks for all of your responses! I have definitely considered getting a rescue. I live in North Carolina, and I know there are a lot of awesome rescues in this state. I really want to get a puppy so I can raise and train my dog the way I want to, so that would be the only thing keeping me from getting a rescue. However, I know you can often times find puppies in need, so I will definitely keep my eye on those NC rescues! Could anybody recommend a good, reputable breeder in North Carolina though? I live in western NC up in the mountains, but I definitely don't mind travelling, so recommendations for breeders in Tennessee, South Carolina, Georgia, etc. would also be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
There are many people who can offer breeder recommendations in that area. My only breeder in TN is a working breeder not suitable for first time doberman puppy owners.

I have a rescue who I got as a 4yo last year and I though I'd comment on this. I used to feel the same way as you thinking you can not change a dog and train them the way you like, bond as well, etc, but boy was I wrong. My current boy eats sleeps and breathes everything around me. He lives with two other people who he could care less about, and every second of everyday, he is right by my side or staring at me. I take him everywhere with me, and he is rarely in the house for more than 2 hours alone. Anywhere a dog can go, he goes. I had a few temperament issues when I first brought him home, but since getting him into professional training, he is the perfect dog for what I needed in a first time Doberman. We dabble in obedience, rally, schutzhund, and some fun agility, and I can basically train him in anything I choose. (Granted he will not be as competitive as nicely bred dogs). However, do not dismiss a dog because of age. I know it may be hard to believe, but very few people know that I have not had Zeus since a puppy, and you would not be able to tell otherwise.

I think with a good trainer, a good rescue selection, and dedication, you can make any adult dog what you want out of it.

Also thought I'd add, it is beyond nice to be able to sleep in for 12 hours once in awhile and not have a puppy screaming in my face to be let out 4 times during that period.
 

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Good luck with a pup! Read up all you can on Dobe puppies, a lot of new people to the breed have no idea what they are in for. I am in my 20's and have been doing rescue for many years. I did purchase a 5 month old pup and it is like having another full time job. I don't party or really socialize like my peers because all my free time went to bringing him up right. It is a LOT of work and I had the luxury of starting with a 5 month old who was already house and crate trained and used to ear posting. Young pups can be ca-razy. The reason I suggest an adult rescue was from my experiences in watching people in your situation buy puppies. There are some young people on here who have raised dobe pups, I hope they chime in on how much work it is to give you an idea. Good breeders are usually hesitant to place pups into homes with college aged kids unless you show extreme committment. Search for some new puppy owner experiences on this forum..there are plenty...
 

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I have a Dobe from ADAMAS in Georgia. I have no idea though when/if she might be breeding again. I am thrilled with Flirt and will be going back to her in the future. I highly recommend her. There are other good ones in your area also but I'm in CA and geographically challenged, so hopefully others can chime in.
 

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Dober-DERP
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I would second a rescue of an adult dog.

I got Rosie not long ago, and she's been a dream (She's two). She's already potty trained and knows basic commands. We're working on "speak" right now.

She's quick as a whip so it's all been much easier than with a puppy. I know from experience with other dog breeds that you can't really start 'true' training until they mature a little...sometimes that's at 8months! Puppies are hard to train, because like human babies, they have short attention spans.

As for bonding, she's more attached than my daughter is:p She's sitting here right now nuzzling the crap out of me while I'm trying to type. She follows me around the house, and lays down to nap with me and to sleep. I don't think her little nub has stopped wiggling for longer than a few minutes when she's awake.

Adult dogs don't need 24/7 care, they're easier to train under normal circumstances, and you'll be able to sleep through the night. PLUS you may be able to find one with it's ears already done and then you won't need to go through weeks of posting/cleaning them!
 

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joie de vivre
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If your only hesitation with an older pup or young dog is that you won't be able to raise them to suit your expectations and the bonding thing, it really is kind of a non-issue. Dogs are generally smart and adaptable. Just because they were raised and trained one way doesn't mean they can't adapt to whatever your expectations are. And many a good adult dogs bond wonderfully to their new owners because they're so relieved, relaxed, and appreciative to have a comfortable, loving home. They show you their appreciation with undying adoration and love.

If you're in college, have a roommate, and have a busy social life you enjoy I would definitely NOT recommend a Doberman puppy. These guys are like raising a 2-3 year old human child in many ways as far as being time consuming, demanding, and needing lots of attention. So if you don't feel like you could have a 2-year old right now and be happy doing everything it takes to be a good parent - don't get a puppy. I'd recommend looking into rescues or even adult breeder rehome dogs. My girl Tali came to me as a 2-year old after she didn't work out in her first home and she was easy-peasy compared to raising Fiona as a puppy. Tali was crate trained, house trained, well mannered, and just waiting for the right home to come along. There are many great dogs you may be missing out on by narrowing your search to puppies only. :)

Granted, you can stick a puppy in a crate when you need a break and that's frowned upon with human children :D, but some people abuse the crate when they tire of the stress and responsibility of the puppy. I see it fairly often with people that come to our training club for help. So just try to be honest with yourself about how much time and energy you're really willing to put into any puppy or dog. Don't do it if you're not committed to really working to meet the dog's needs for the next 10+ years.

Good luck in your search.
 

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sweep the leg
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I've just really got to second what brw1982 said. . . I am week 1 into my new dobe puppy and it amazes me how similar it is to raising my own children. So many demands are like that of a human baby! Up all night, CONSTANT attention to bathroom needs, 100% attention when they're awake. I literally take the phone off the hook and kick everyone out when she's napping so they don't wake the baby!

I am home with her 24/7 so she's getting all the attention she can handle - she'd be a mess if I had to leave her for extended periods throughout the day. They really are very high maintenance as pups. And if you have that kind of time and focus like I do, then it's well worth it! If not, a dobe puppy is surely not the way to go.

Think about it, look up your local rescue or maybe even consider an older show dog in need of a rehome. You can locate reputable breeders in your area off the DPCA's breeder referral page. Find some you like, search for them here on DT (because a mention on DPCA is not a guarantee the breeder is reputable) and then see if any are looking to rehome older dogs.

Just an idea to consider. . . I wish you the best and let us know how it goes!
 

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My first doberman was 3 when I adopted him and I had no issues bonding with him or training him. Even tho I owned 6 dogs before him he was my first doberman. I think it was a good step for me to go with an adult as now that I have a puppy like everyone is saying that they need more attention than say a lab or a golden. They are very intelligent and because of that the way you train them is a little different.

Having an adult doberman first in my experience prepared me for raising a puppy. If you don't give them the attention they need as a puppy it causes a lot of behavior problems like lots of whining, barking, chewing things they are not suppose to etc. I understand your wanting to raise a puppy and if you do I recommend finding someone experienced with doberman's to help guide you in how to train them.

When I got a doberman for the first time, I knew the were smart but after having my second I completly under estimated how smart they really are. It's like a child that isn't being challenged in school so they act out and get bad grades, but once you challenge them and stop giving them that easy stuff they can do in their sleep their behavior changes for the better. Doberman have to be mentally and physically challenged.
 

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We are a family of four with a doberman for the first time - it's been an eyeopener & she's 3 years old, not a puppy.

My kids are 19 & 21 & the dog is always with someone - but although we already love her, we do feel the pressure. (at 5:30 in the morning, when she's bumping your arm while you text, when you are trying to sort out schedules for supervision & obedience classes.)

She's awesome - comes to a whistle, walks well on a lead, loves people (not so good with other animals) - most of the rescues I looked at had a really good description on what type of home would work well for the dog & they won't set you up with one that wouldn't work well with your lifestyle.

I also thought I wanted a puppy - then I read about doberman puppies & promptly changed my mind. I'm very glad that we found our slightly older dog.

(Make sure that if you have a bunch of people over, they know that they shouldn't feed the dog snacks - dobergas is a hideous thing.)
Kate
 

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I just hope you realize that getting a dog means that you WILL dedicate 10+ years of your life to this dog. Very few college aged people know that they can provide 100% until even the next year.

Zeldarules is right. I think you would have a difficult time finding a reputable breeder willing to give you a puppy. I hope that you won't fall back on a less than stellar breeder because of this.

I get it. Puppies are cute, but think about it.
 

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u mad?
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I also think that an adult/young adult rescue would be a good option. I'm pretty sure that's not what you want to hear, OP, but it is a good idea. Many people get rescue dogs and have no problems bonding with them and training them. Many of the agility and obedience dogs at my training club are rescue dogs. Certainly many, if not all, of those dogs went into the rescue with agility and/or obedience training to begin with.

Anyways, I'm a grad student. I got my boy over spring break of my senior year and had the whole summer to pay attention to him.... and that's what I did. I was never allowed to have a dog as a kid and had wanted one for as long as I could remember. Every birthday and every Christmas I wished for a dog. So, when it came time for me to graduate college I decided that I was going to be getting myself a dog and I was dead-set on a puppy. While I love my boy and I wouldn't trade him for the world an older dog would have been a smarter option for me. Puppies in general are a legitimate amount of work and doberman puppies can be monsters! I had the summer to deal with him, which helped, but it's still hard to juggle a puppy and responsibilities.

You can ask my boyfriend but last summer went completely to my dog. Dreizehn was a pretty "easy" puppy, from stories that I've heard, but he was still demanding. He had to be watched constantly and entertained. Dobermans are ridiculously smart and if left bored and to their own devices they will free every object in your possession of the dragons that live inside of them. Also, Dreizehn definitely dictated my social life. If I went out to places where he couldn't go than I could only be gone for a certain (short) amount of time because Dreizehn was a puppy and I wasn't comfortable with him being crated all day, nor did I want to leave the burden of my puppy onto my parents. Not only that, but Dreizehn was nonstop. I was lucky to work at a doggy daycare so he could come to work with me and play with a bunch of dogs for 6-8 hours. Then, after work I'd take him to the dog park for another hour or two before going home. When we got home after 8-10 hours of almost continuous play and random training sessions he was still ready to go for more. Luckily my social life was pretty minimal to begin with so he didn't have much to cut down on. I got Dreizehn at 13 weeks of age so it wasn't long before he could sleep through the whole night but I was still exhausted. When he was napping and I finally had free time to do stuff all i wanted to do was sleep.

As to those who are saying that many breeders aren't comfortable placing a puppy with a college student and/or young adult, that's very true. I did get a puppy as a college student. However, I had years of working with dogs under my belt which included working with a reputable vet, I had a legitimate plan with my future when it came to the dog and how I would handle any problems that arose, and I had my parent's full support which, I think, made a huge impact with my boy's breeder. There are many young members on the forum but I think we may be the minority. The fact is that for every good, young dog owner there are 10 (or more) that get a puppy and then realize that it's far too much for them and so they sump the puppy in a shelter.

Anyways, I'll get off my soapbox now. There are some good breeders in your area that I would definitely suggest you contact. However, there are also MANY dobes in rescues that would love you forever for giving them their forever home and I think that's an option you should legitimately consider.
 

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Welcome to the forum :D

I would do some research on what it costs to be a responsible Doberman owner as well. This breed is not cheap to own. I am sure that a few of the members here would be more than happy to break down the annual/lifetime costs of owning this breed. Are you aware of some of the health issues that can affect this breed? If not, familiarize yourself with that as well.

Since you said that you have roommates I am going to assume that you rent. Make sure that you will be allowed to have a Doberman where you live (some insurance companies will not cover you if you own a Doberman).

GOOD LUCK and I would tell you to look into adopting a young adult from a rescue as well as I think it would be a better fit for your situation rather than a puppy. There are a few very reputable Doberman rescues located in North Carolina. If you decide to go the rescue route we would be happy to refer you to the reputable rescues :)
 

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I know they can be territorial, or would this be a non-issue with proper socialization and training?

^^^^ My old girl, goes everywhere with me...OB trained off-leash & extensively pup socialized to +1000 people of all ages, noises and places.
Amy has gone to:
- fireworks
- office poker party
- new prefab house lift, on foundation
- house reno job site, free to come in the house or rest just outside...her choice
- friends BBQ party, with horse rides
- air shows campout party, with fire pit & kids playing
- fairs
- car shows (cruise night)
etc.

She is terrritorial, only to the point of staying close by me & not ever wondering off....always seems to know the lot or plot boundaries, Dad is standing on.
 
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