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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, I recently bred my doberman Tazz with a female and agreed to get first pick of the litter. I saw the pups for the first time today and there was one fawn. It is going to be the one I am going to take. I was just wanting to know if caring for a fawn is any different than caring for a black and tan. Are there any special conditions or health problems that I should be aware of? It will be another 5 - 6 weeks before I can bring him home, so I am wanting to get all the info I can on fawn dobermans. Any information would be great and appreciated.
 

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It would seem that if you felt comfortable enough to breed your dog, then you should be knowledgable about the dilutes and all the health concerns that come with them. Are you aware of all the problems caused by people back yard breeding?

There are some concerns regarding their coats, perhaps one of the more experienced and knowledgeable people on the board will be able to give you some valid information.
 

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Josh,
The dilute coat colors are often times associated with skin problems, fawns also are at a higher risk for sunburn - Mr. Desi (a member here) has a gorgeous fawn and will more than likely post soon reguarding his experiences with his fawn girl.
Another thing you should really reconsider is bringing home a male pup. You already have one male - male Dobes are notoriously same sex aggressive. Things may start off fine, especially since one will be a pup, but can quickly go very badly as the pup hits maturity.
 

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Dilutes are at higher risk of coat/skin problems. Thinning of the coat, sometimes baldness. Dry skin, and chances of secondary infections are also inceased. Supplements and a good quality food can help from the beginning, but there is never a guarantee. I'm sure that others will add to the list. Like TJ said, I would be concerned about adding another male to house. That outways any skin/coat issues you will have.
 

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josh_d said:
It will be another 5 - 6 weeks before I can bring him home, so I am wanting to get all the info I can on fawn dobermans. Any information would be great and appreciated.
I appreciate you wanting info there is a vast knowledge within this group of lovely amazing caring humans here who own, breed or are thinking of getting a dobe. I am just going to shake my head a male and a male what are you thinking. Aside from the information here that is vast amount take a look on the internet of wonderful not back yard breeders and see what they say about a male doberman vs a male doberman living in the same household not even another breed which is still oh myyyyyyyyyyyy. If you don't even know how to take care of a dobe of another colour what are you going to do when a male who goes in for the throat, for this is my house or breeding rights, to the death my friend? It is ugly! Saw it once and will never want to see it again. Not in my house some one elses I have the scars to show from trying to pull them apart while the owner who made the wonderful decision from a breeder saying they will be fine and the owner screaminng oh my ---oh my. There are few and far between that get along so are you willing to go the distance till all mature and the day comes and then you have to decide who you want and who you will discard and say it's best they go with another family. Purely an emotional response you want and picked by you or logical what is best. hope I have not offended you or anyone else just tired of people not hearing knowledge that is at the tip of their fingers.
 

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Hi, owning a Blue myself I will give you a few things and a link that really helped me when I got Iris and she was almost bald (since your post is about wanting to gather knowledge about caring for a fawn)
First and formost high quality dog food!!!! This is the main thing that we found with our Blue.. Next here is a link for a site about caring for a blue or Fawn in our case..http://www.seattle-attorney.com/storm/sup.html
I know that it has helped my girl.. Good luck and keep us posted..
 

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I don't see where he has said the fawn was a male, as a matter of fact, I havn't seen any sex stipulation at all.
 

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sundobe said:
I don't see where he has said the fawn was a male, as a matter of fact, I havn't seen any sex stipulation at all.

It will be another 5 - 6 weeks before I can bring him home, so I am wanting to get all the info I can on fawn dobermans. Any information would be great and appreciated.
First line... "before I can bring him home" I think is where it is understood that he is bringing a male home.

Don't want to be involved in this topic, just wanted to point out where the male sex reference was mentioned. :emo8:
 

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It will be another 5 - 6 weeks before I can bring him home, so I am wanting to get all the info I can on fawn dobermans. Any information would be great and appreciated.
I do not know enough about dilutes to have any sort of input on their coats, but I do know about male on male aggression. It is not some thing I would even try simply because I fall too much in love with my pets ( even my fish ).
my only advice would be for you to pick which one you want to be dominant, and never stray from your choice, since you are the pack leader you choose the heirarchy not them...

Good luck, and post pic's of the pups!!
 

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josh_d said:
Hello everyone, I recently bred my doberman Tazz with a female and agreed to get first pick of the litter. I saw the pups for the first time today and there was one fawn. \ Any information would be great and appreciated.
. Are there any special conditions or health problems that I should be aware of? It will be another 5 - 6 weeks before I can bring him home, so I am wanting to get all the info I can on fawn dobermans. Any information would be great and appreciated.

sundobe said:
I don't see where he has said the fawn was a male, as a matter of fact, I havn't seen any sex stipulation at all.
 

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"I don't see where he has said the fawn was a male, as a matter of fact, I havn't seen any sex stipulation at all."

MY MISTAKE - but thank you for pointing that out so nicely....
 

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I dont want to get anyone mad at me or anything but if hes asking for help on this and is already planning on bring the puppy home i understand male vs. male isnt always good but i have learned from experiance that its not always bad. Not all males try to hurt each other. Plus not to sound mean but the only real thing we can do about him breeding his dog is to tell him is to not do it next time and strongly recommand him getting his dog fixed. When it comes to the puppy all we can do is recommand him not to get another male but if he does bring it home then we should really help him about how to take care of a fawn instead of centering the whole topic on male vs male. As important as male vs male is telling him about it wont do any good if he is dead set on bringing it home. We should help him as much as possible about how to take care of a fawn so he knows 1. what he is in for and 2. we know we have done our best to inform the owner of how to care for a fawn doberman. We do not want to scare off someone who is asking for help might make a mistake and did breed his doberman without knowing everything. No good will come from scaring him off.

Once again i do not want anyone to get mad at me for this post. I just felt it had to be said.
 

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Many breeders do not breed for dilution due to coat issues, specifically called Color Dilution Alopecia (CDA). There is a test out that can tell you if your dog carries the gene to produce dilution or not. Exactly what health testing did you do on your male or on the female before breeding?
Good coats can be genetic, so knowing the lines you are breeding on both sides would be helpful.

The link someone gave you above on blues is an excellent resource. The food should be very high quality, take time to familiarize yourself with the ingredients and the various food companies (examples of suitable foods are Innova, California Natural, Eagle Pack, Solid Gold, etc.) and extra care should be taken on supplements and overall coat care.

And you are asking for big trouble raising a male with his son. Male to male aggression is not uncommon. Then you will have to either keep them separated for life in your house and pray no mistakes are made which can hurt the dogs or the people intervening in the fights or give one away after you have bonded to the animal. The odds are not in your favor keeping multiple males. It also stresses out the males involved to always have to be on their toes...just not a good situation. Here is a short story: http://www.kinetic-unity.com/males.html. There are countless examples like this out there. Playing together for short periods of time with other males is one things, living together is vastly different, intact or not.

If you are breeding a litter, you should already be aware of dog aggression, health testing, how to take care of blues and fawns, etc. You will want to read this: http://bakaridobes.westhost.com/publiceducation/PECRepro.html
You also might want to spend some time on this helpful and informative site: http://www.breedered.com/article_menu.htm
 

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Prettydobie said:
i understand male and male is not always good, but I have learned from experience its not always bad
How much experience do you really have with multiple Dobe male situations?
Countless Doberman breeders and rescues with years and years of experience with the breed do not recommend living with multiple males for a REASON. Once again, playing with another male and living with one is very different. It also varies with the temperament on each dog. That is the problem with getting a puppy, you never know what will happen at maturity, and if you already have a male, hard decisions must be made for the health and welfare of the canines and humans involved. The male Dobermans temperament is not passive, and as was already said, the standard even allows for dog aggression in this breed. That doesn't mean it is always there, my male is laid back and plays great with other males, but I would never chance living with multiple males. Like the poster above, I love all of my animals very much and become attached to each one, living with multiple males is not worth it.
 

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My doberman isnt my first doberman Ive grown up with them my whole life my first doberman was a male named star and we had another male named aries. They got along great we didnt have any trouble with them. The only real problem we had with them is we had to feed them in different rooms.
 

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Thank you D&D for posting the link to that story! How sad. I love how she acknowledges that if she had only listened to the advice in the beginning... Am also very thankful that it turned out as well as it did, it could have been so much worse. You always have the best links! :)
 

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Prettydobie said:
My doberman isnt my first doberman Ive grown up with them my whole life my first doberman was a male named star and we had another male named aries. They got along great we didnt have any trouble with them. The only real problem we had with them is we had to feed them in different rooms.
PD although I agree that we should give sound advice to the OP, I believe that all involved has given sound advice. Whereas your dogs got along well, more often than not, male dobes do not do well with other male dogs. Of course there are exceptions to every rule - but why risk it? The OP has not yet brought this pup home; although he likes the look of the fawn, hopefully with the advice he's gotten here he'll make the decision to choose a female pup rather than another male.
We would hardly be doing him any favors by telling him anything other than what we have about male Dobes and same sex aggression.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Well the fawn is a male but my doberman Tazz is kept at my parents house because that is where he has lived all his life and I didn't really want to move him with me when I got my own place because I didn't really want to change his environment. So actually the two males will not be living at the same home. Sorry for the confusion but I appreciate everyone's concern.
 
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