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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone, this is my first time logging into this forum, I'm just hoping to increase my knowledge about dobermans before purchasing a puppy! I've already found two reputable breeders in my area that look promising, and who have good values and breeding qualifications. I just have two questions before I start contacting them for more information.

First of all - I'm wondering about space. Currently my boyfriend and I live in a two-bedroom apartment condo in the Toronto area. However, there is a large (non-private, obviously) backyard behind the building, which will be more than suitable for pee breaks. As well, there is a large park within a 5-minute drive of the building. The owners of the condo do allow pets, including Dobermans. As my boyfriend and I are very active, (camping, hiking, biking, etc.) is it likely that I will get rejected for a puppy because we live in a condo?

As well, what other things are good breeders looking for when choosing a home for their puppies?

Thank you for the help!
 

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sufferin succotash
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Some breeders prefer pups go to a home with a fenced in yard, for the pup's safety. Is it a deal breaker? From some, yes. It's best to contact the breeders directly and explain your living arrangements.

Here are some other things you will want to think about:

-what training club will you use? (for obedience training)
-what vet will you use?
-what training method will you use?

Please take some time to check out this thread: http://www.dobermantalk.com/breeding-breeders/47441-reputable-breeders-new-folks.html

Excellent resources can also be found here: Doberman Pinscher Club of America: Living With a Dobe
 

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u mad?
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Other than what's been mentioned already, my boys breeder asked things like...
What experience do you have with dogs?
What experience do you have with dobermans?
What other pets do you have?
How did your past pets die?
Why a doberman?
Why are you looking for a dog in general?
What do you want to do with this dog?
 

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Hairy Dog, RIP Caesar, Katana, Kip, Capri
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Think about whether or not you can get suitable housing that allows dobermans if you have to move too. I hear that as a major problem sometimes--"we need to move and we can't find a place to stay with the dog!" Sometimes those people end up having to give up their dog, so a breeder may keep that in mind.

I got my first dobe while DH and I lived in an apartment, so it is doable, but you might have to look hard for a breeder.

Exercise can be a big problem with a young doberman. They are too young to go biking or jogging with you til about 18 months, but as they mature, many males in particular, become difficult to allow free run if there are other male dogs around. And people's attitudes start to get in the way too. Rest assured that if any fuss starts which involves your dog, even on the periphery, he is the one likely to be blamed for it. If you think through exactly how you will exercise your dog (every day, remember) before you talk to a breeder, you'll have better luck persuading them you will be responsible with their dear little baby.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Think about whether or not you can get suitable housing that allows dobermans if you have to move too.
This shouldnt be an issue - both my parents and my boyfriends parents love and own dogs -> no dobermans, but I grew up with an amazing female Rottweiler who died at the age of 11, and they now have a black lab, and his parents have a two year old golden retreiver. My whole extended family loves dogs as well so finding someone they know to watch them for a while if absolutely necessary will not be an issue (I think we'd all agree that we'd rather not be separated from our pups unless necessary).

Sorry, I think I misunderstood that. As for when we move, we're planning on purchasing the puppy 2-3 years from now, and in about 5 years we'll both have full-time careers, so when we do move it will be to our own house, probably in a less-crowded area of Toronto (or just outside), so we will definitely be looking for a house with a large fenced backyard. After that at some point we will likely be looking to add another pup to the house, but that's a topic for the future.

Exercise can be a big problem with a young doberman. They are too young to go biking or jogging with you til about 18 months, but as they mature, many males in particular, become difficult to allow free run if there are other male dogs around.
Yes while the puppy is young chances are we will only be taking him (we have already decided we want a black and tan male) for short, leashed walks probably around the block or just in the backyard. As he matures, we will extend the walks and take him to more places. As well, I have found a dog park within a 5-mile radius that allows off-leash play sessions, however I am weary of these. I seem to find some of the wort-trained dogs in this area. Most likely the dog will be kept on-leash during walks, especially around people, perhaps unless we're light hiking in a forested park.

As for the misconception about the breed, I am not too worried. We are both dedicated to having an extremely well-trained dog. I remember growing up when people would cross the street to avoid us and our giant rottie, who would quietly and proudly walk by, completely ignoring them, while their little dog would pull at the leash, barking madly. Gotta love stereotypes.
 

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Greetings, CarlinD! Welcome to DT.

Excellent info from Sam&MacksMom above. I agree, most (probably all) responsible breeders are going to inquire about your living arrangements, including whether you own or rent, type of home, whether or not you have a fenced yard, and height and type of fencing. I'm certain that some breeders absolutely require it, especially from homes that are new to the breed; but don't let that discourage you. What's important is that you have a solid plan laid out, for how you intend to housebreak and exercise your puppy without a securely fenced yard; it's a commitment that will require serious consistency and probably some extra patience on your part.

Melbrod makes a good point about renting. I rent, and since acquiring Thakoon roughly three and a half years ago, I've already moved twice and I'm about to move a third time. Thakoon has taken it all in stride though; he has adapted so well to any new situation we come into. I have been very fortunate to find rental situations accepting of my dog, available at the right price at the right time. I know first hand how challenging it can be to find suitable semi-permanent housing as a Doberman owner.

Responsible breeders are also going to want to know how long of hours/type of shifts you and your boyfriend work, and how this relates to the amount of time the puppy will be alone during the day, and how often someone will be around to provide relief.

Lastly, breeders will want to know your experience with dogs, with Dobermans (if any) and why you feel the Doberman is the breed choice for you. You will likely be asked what your plans are for your puppy; as this is a breed that does require a "job" in a sense. These dogs really benefit from ongoing training and often excel in competitive obedience, agility, personal protection sports etc. Think about the goals you have in mind for your puppy and be prepared to discuss them when inquiring about litters. This will help breeders determine the type of home you can provide and then match you up with a suitable puppy.

Good luck in your search! :)


 

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I'm so glad you started this thread! As I'm looking to get a puppy soon, from a good breeder, I've been a bit nervous as to what questions might be asked of me.
 

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I've moved 4 times with my Doberman and he is only 2. If you are dedicated and responsible enough, it's very doable. One of the places I lived with Prime was in a 3rd floor apartment with no fenced in yard. It really sucked especially still having to take him out in freezing, rainy, and scorching temps, but to me, Doberman ownership is worth the hassle and I often put my dog's needs above my own.
 

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A lot of times it's what you don't say :) I put a LOT of stock in my gut feeling too.... If you are open and honest about how you plan to look after your puppy that goes a long way. So do lots of research, most breeders have a questionnaire so ask for one and you will get an idea of what will be asked of you :)
 

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A lot of times it's what you don't say :) I put a LOT of stock in my gut feeling too.... If you are open and honest about how you plan to look after your puppy that goes a long way. So do lots of research, most breeders have a questionnaire so ask for one and you will get an idea of what will be asked of you :)
I was going to say that too. I know Jordan's breeder takes a lot on her gut feeling as well. She came out and did the home visit and of course asked a lot of questions (like why we wanted another doberman, what our plans were, etc.) but she also said a lot of it came down to gut. :D
 

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I agree, The more information you give the better and make sure you ask questions too. Just make sure your 100% honest, as they are only asking these questions to establish what lifestyle you have and which pup is going to be the right one for your lifestyle.
I have no experience with dobermans as of yet, and when my breeder asked have i had any experience with dobermans and i said no, it gave her more incentive to teach me more, and give me loads of information i needed and books, websites, people that have had her dobermans before etc. it really helped me, it took longer as she advised me to wait and learn more but i'm totally ready now :D she wouldnt have known wthout the questions, Good Luck!

:D
 

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I think establishing a good relationship with the breeder is important. I had known my breeder a long time before I got my girl. I got Josie about 3 weeks before I moved into the house I bought, and because my breeder knew me so well, she was comfortable letting Josie stay in the apartment with me for a few weeks.
 
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