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Very simple questions regarding drive and training...

What are you guys using to build drive in your doberman? Haley usually has a good play/food/praise drive, but I want to do what ever I can to bring out as much as I can.
 

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There's a good book called Building Blocks of Performance I think by Bobbie Anderson. It talks about the little things we can do to build drive. First off, always stop when they want more. Short fast sessions, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There's a good book called Building Blocks of Performance I think by Bobbie Anderson. It talks about the little things we can do to build drive. First off, always stop when they want more. Short fast sessions, etc.
I'll check out that book. I found some Michael Ellis stuff that I really liked. It was focused primarily on using a lot of tug to build on drive. Short and sweet is a great point and something I have used. I know a lot of people crate before and after to build drive. I haven't tried it. I do however know for a fact that when I first get home from work is when we get our best workouts. She was home with the wife and newborn all day and is ready to go! She's on point and I'm the greatest thing in the world to her. On average, morning and night are a totally different story. She just doesn't have the same get up and go.
 

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I agree with the other posts. My trainer is also trying to get me to work more on Crate Games with my dog, so she has more drive and is totally ready to work the minute I bring her out of her crate (ie at dog class, at shows, etc.). I have Susan Garrett's DVD but have not focused on it as much as I should...

Crate Games
 

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To increase toy drive: I don't allow him any toys, he only get to play with a toy with me under my rules.

To increase Prey: Flirt pole, always leave him wanting it. One thing to do is not let him get it, to the point he is very frustrated. Then give it to him. You have to watch this because different dog do it differently. A softer dog will say o well its not worth it shut down. Others will fight and fight until they do get it, even using there brain to figure out how they can get it. Build it up slowly.

To increase attention: Focus games, I will put him in heel position and reinforce with food until he looks away. I say no and walk away and we start over. If he's in the right position giving me attention he gets continuous reinforcement.

I crate prior to training. I think crating is wonderful and has so many uses in dog training. I use the crate as a neutral spot that we transition from between certain drives/exercises.

Another thing I also do to condition him to react certain ways it my voice, my attire, my equipment.

If i'm taking him out to work I talk in a happy energetic tone"lets work". When I put him up I say "where done" in a neutral tone.

If he see's my trainers vest he know where going work(I also say let work), if he sees scratch pants(helper) he know its time to bark ect..

If he sees a pinch/prong he knows where doing work, if he sees a harness or agitation collar he knows where doing bite work.

When building drives in a dog control should be exercised. You want to be bale to get the dog riled up and zooming but you also want to be able to calm the dog down as well.
 

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In many training environments you see the handlers and helpers doing circus acts to get the dog in drive. This stimulation is pure prey stimulation. The problem with it is the less movement (stimulation) the less drive in the dog.

If you want the dog to bring more it needs to be the opposite. We make puppies and young dogs initiate the work. When they start barking the handler starts swinging the tug (we use a big tug with a 6' leash attached to it). When the dog stops barking the tug stops moving. When the dog is fully loaded you then give them the tug. We also are teaching the dog to pull. This allows for a better grip and can carry over later into better hindering of the helper in escape bites and re-attacks.
 

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In many training environments you see the handlers and helpers doing circus acts to get the dog in drive. This stimulation is pure prey stimulation. The problem with it is the less movement (stimulation) the less drive in the dog.

If you want the dog to bring more it needs to be the opposite. We make puppies and young dogs initiate the work. When they start barking the handler starts swinging the tug (we use a big tug with a 6' leash attached to it). When the dog stops barking the tug stops moving. When the dog is fully loaded you then give them the tug. We also are teaching the dog to pull. This allows for a better grip and can carry over later into better hindering of the helper in escape bites and re-attacks.
I'm curious how puppies that are raised like that are in the home. Do you build an off switch? I understand that there can be a distinction between working dogs and pets, but how is it like to live with one of those dogs?
 

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Do you build an off switch? I understand that there can be a distinction between working dogs and pets, but how is it like to live with one of those dogs?
Not a problem, but to be honest I don't ask a lot of them as far as manners. Off switch as a young dog is called obedience.
 
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