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Hi, bringing my baby girl home in the next few days, to my two ten month old dobies. Have read extensively and dealt with a professional trainer throughout my wife's pregnancy. I must say the dogs, being male and female siblings, have grown and developed into two very well behaved young dogs, and I have no doubt into their acceptance and behavior when they are finally introduced. Have tried to search this forum to no avail as would love to hear on fellow members personal experiences and any useful tips, thank you and all the best
 

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Bring an item that contains your baby's scent, such as a baby blanket, from the hospital before bringing home the baby. During this exercise, it is crucial that you set clear boundaries. Have your dog's sniff from a distance, while you are holding the item. By doing so, you are communicating to your dog that the item is yours and then giving permission for the dog to sniff. "This new item belongs to me, and you will need to follow my rules when around it." This helps start the process of creating respect for the baby.

Start by taking your dog's on a long walk. Be sure to drain all of your dog's energy before returning. Make sure your dog's are calm before inviting them in. When you enter your house, your dog's will instantly know there is a new scent in the house. If you have already introduced the scent, it will be somewhat familiar. The mother or father holding the baby must be in a completely calm state. The dog should be allowed to sniff the baby, but at a respectful distance. During this first meeting, do not bring the baby too close. Eventually, the dog can be allowed to get closer and closer to the baby. By doing this, you are teaching the dog to respect the baby. I would even consider introducing the dogs separately so that you feel like you have more control over just one dog at a time rather than two.

Once your child is in the exploratory state, it is important to supervise all interactions between him or her and the dog's. This is a great opportunity to teach your child not to bother the dog, yank her tail, etc. These lessons on mutual respect cannot begin early enough. There have been too many children that have inadvertently provoked an otherwise peaceful dog, simply because they were unsupervised or their parents had not given them proper instruction. And resulted in a bite or a growl.

Don't forget the dog. A dog does not need toys or special attention to feel important; you simply need to maintain the routine, providing daily walks and attention. This will help your dog feel secure and allow her to relax about the new addition to the family.

We expect to see pics of your new addition and your lovely dogs ;)
 

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Almost 30 years, I drove my 1967 Beaumont (Canadian Chevelle hardtop) to the hospital, and picked up my wife and new born baby.

Dobe in back seat, she was in full alert (ears to the shy)...who is this baby, coming home?...LOL
- nurse didn't want to put newborn, in the car (for safety reasons)...I said, she is fine

Dobe realized real quick, her role as our only "baby of the family"...had ended.
But, we included her in everything.
When she was on the couch, baby got diapers changed on couch to / we always kept the two of them close, and avoid added dobe jealousy.
 

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Include your Dobes in all the baby activities - let them sit by while she's nursing, being bathed, having her diaper changed - and talk to the dogs the whole time - tell them about the baby, tell them they are good - just don't exclude them and give them reason to be jealous or hyper-curious - you want them to feel that this is a member of their pack, not someone who they can't get to know. Hold her in the "burp" position, so they can sniff her and see her, and praise them for being gentle and calm. Of course, you must never, ever leave them alone with her for a very long time (different for each dog), but if you make them feel excluded, they'll be more apt to be resentful or sad, whereas if you include them, as you would a new puppy, they'll make happy associations. And, as Shadowolf said - please don't disrupt their routines or games or special times - that would be a mistake. ...and - congratulations!
 

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Congratulations on your new addition and best of luck! Just keep them included and let them be around as much as possible...hopefully they will do great!!
 
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