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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The wait is over. Finally I will pick my new dobie girl up in the airport this saturday. She is 2 years old. Any tips on how to make the transition into the home as good as possible? I think my two year old son will be scared of her in the beginning. Any tips on how to introduce them? The dog is very used to small kids. I have never bought an adult dobermann before. I know, so many questions, but I'm excited and my head is spinning around :loll:
 

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I guess I would just try not to overwhelm her with too much too soon. Give her some time to get used to her new surrondings.

I myself have never brought in an adult dog so I am just kinda guessing. But I am looking forward to seeing some pics of the new girl!
 

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Ameteur Houdini
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I'm hoping to adopt an adult dog soon, so this thread will be interesting. One thing i will say is, don't let your child be scared of her. You should probably talk to him about how to behave around dogs (if you already haven't), how to be respectful, and quite importantly, confident. Make sure he see's how positively you act around the dog.

So excited for you! Pictures are a must!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm hoping to adopt an adult dog soon, so this thread will be interesting. One thing i will say is, don't let your child be scared of her. You should probably talk to him about how to behave around dogs (if you already haven't), how to be respectful, and quite importantly, confident. Make sure he see's how positively you act around the dog.

So excited for you! Pictures are a must!
Thank you for the tip. The problem is my son is only almost 2, and can't talk/understand yet. Only simple words. But he loves dogs and get happy every time he see one. But if they get too close he get scared. I don't think it will be a big problem though but I thought someone might have a tip.
 

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Ameteur Houdini
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Ahh, I didn't see how old he was. I think once he becomes accustomed to them, if he doesn't have a super negative experience, he should be fine. Good luck!
 

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joie de vivre
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I would take it pretty slow with her. Give her time to relax, pressure free (apart from expected general house manners) so she can adjust to her new home.

She'll be confused and there's usually a 'honeymoon' period with new dogs where they're on their best behavior because they're nervous and unsure of their surroundings. So you may think she's the most brilliant, well-mannered dog in the world (and maybe she is) but after a few weeks she may start to test boundaries and act out a bit as she becomes more comfortable and trusting of you. Just take it slow.

Have you had the chance to observe your son interacting with her yet? I'm a skeptic of just being told a dog is "X, Y, and Z" and prefer to see it myself so I can make my own judgement about whether the dog is in fact "X, Y, and Z".
 

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when she gets home let her be and let her investigate her new surroundings without any disruptions. keep an eye on her but let her take everything in first. Try to let her approach family members rather then you approach her. If all of you crowd her all at once when she first gets home that can be to much. Let your 2 year old observe you petting the dog and play with the dog and when your kid is ready he will approach her.

always, always supervise their interaction and be a step away so that your boy can start learning the word gentle because kids that age like to take objects or their hands and hit things including pets.

Before you introduce the dog to your boy have her sniff a dirty diaper, blanket, ect something that has your boys smell on it that way she can get familiar with his scent before meeting him. That way when they do meet she will catch a smell of him and be oh that smell belongs to him and she wont feel so inclined to approach him and smell. She can smell from a distance.
 

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Congratulations! I too am hoping to bring home an adult in the near future. Good luck! She's at a nice age.....and I bet she is beautiful :)
 

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Use gates and crates at first to keep both her and your son from becoming overwhelmed- at first if needed leash her and have her down stay so your son gets accustomed to her slowly while they are together.

and congrats on your new addition !
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Have you had the chance to observe your son interacting with her yet? I'm a skeptic of just being told a dog is "X, Y, and Z" and prefer to see it myself so I can make my own judgement about whether the dog is in fact "X, Y, and Z".
No unfortunately not. The dog live in another country far away, so I have not seen them interacting. But I have seen a lot of pictures and videos of the previous owners children interacting with the dog. I know it's not the same when they grew up with her, but it should be a good place to start.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
when she gets home let her be and let her investigate her new surroundings without any disruptions. keep an eye on her but let her take everything in first. Try to let her approach family members rather then you approach her. If all of you crowd her all at once when she first gets home that can be to much. Let your 2 year old observe you petting the dog and play with the dog and when your kid is ready he will approach her.

always, always supervise their interaction and be a step away so that your boy can start learning the word gentle because kids that age like to take objects or their hands and hit things including pets.

Before you introduce the dog to your boy have her sniff a dirty diaper, blanket, ect something that has your boys smell on it that way she can get familiar with his scent before meeting him. That way when they do meet she will catch a smell of him and be oh that smell belongs to him and she wont feel so inclined to approach him and smell. She can smell from a distance.
Thanks a lot for your good advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I've been hoping to adopt soon but I haven't found rescues in my area. How did the "matching" process play out?
It's not a rescue. There is not any dobermann rescues here. I looked for european breeders with dog for sale as I think that a dog who grew up with a good breeder will have been socialized and trained the right way from the beginning. There is a lot of dogs for sale here in Europe, so I talked to a lot of them and looked for one who seemed the best with children and who had the temperament we are looking for. I didn't want a puppy as we live in an apartment now so I thought that would be a good way to go. But thank you for considering to rescue.
 

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Here is a very helpful and insightful link for you to read titled "The Groundwork to establish pack structure with adult dogs"
http://leerburg.com/pdf/packstructure.pdf

Also, this is the 2 week shutdown method..you don't have to follow it word for word as each dog will be different, but it also provides helpful insight and tips:

Edit: Two week shutdown from here: http://www.bulldogbreeds.com/forum/training-stickies/60635-sticky-new-dog-two-week-shutdown.html

The First Two Weeks – Give’em a Break! WHY?

If I could stress one of the biggest errors people make with new dogs and foster dogs it is rushing the dog into the new world so fast . This shut down gives the dog a chance to say “ahhh” take a breath and restart into its new world.

From people I have helped I hear;
"I introduced her to 15 people the first day I had her!" ;" he was a bit leery but seems to like my other 3 dogs" ; "she went everywhere with me "
All in the first few days of the new home..... (!!!)

two weeks later we hear;
" I think we will have to rehome the new dog" "the new dog barked and nipped at my kid" - "we had a dog fight" ; “the new dog barked at me for moving him off the couch”

Ok, folks, here it comes, some feel this is extreme, why? I really do not know.
But when bringing in a new dog, post finding, adoption, buying, etc, Give it time to adjust to you and your family and the dogs in the new environment.
Just as if it were a new baby or puppy, we wouldn’t think of rushing out with a baby or puppy, yet with older pups and dogs we just expect them to take our lives in all at once!

TWO WEEKS - "shut down"
For the first two weeks, (sometimes even longer) a dog takes in the new environment, who is the top person, or animal, who ARE these people!? By pushing a dog too fast, and throwing too much at the dog we look like we are not the leaders,and the dog can feel it MUST defend itself , as the leader is surely no one he has met so far!

We coo , coodle, drag the dog to home to home to person to person, and the dog has NO idea who we are. We correct for things it doesn’t understand, we talk in a new human language using words he does not know.

A key thing to remember is "this is the dating period NOT the honeymoon"
When you first met your "spouse or significant other”, you were on your best behavior, you were not relaxed enough to be all of yourself, were you?
Just think of the things you do physically once you get to KNOW a person,
you wouldn’t run up to a stranger and hug them and squeeze them!
Imagine, if on the first date, this new person, was all over you touching you and having their friends hug you and pat you on the head, and jostle your shoulders, looked in your mouth then he whisked you off to another strangers home and they did the same thing.

Would you think this person normal and SAFE? Wouldn’t you feel invaded and begin to get a bit snarky or defensive yourself? Wouldn’t you think to push these people away for obviously your date is out of their mind, as they aren’t going to save you from these weirdoes!!
Yet we do this very thing to our dogs, and then get upset or worried that they aren’t relaxed and accepting of EVERYTHING instantly!

By shutting down the dog, it gives the dog TIME to see you , meet YOU, hear and take in the new sounds and smells of your home and all the people in it. In the 1st two weeks;
.
Crate the dog in a room by itself if possible.(Believe me, dogs are sensory animals, they know more than you think without seeing it).
Leash the dog (so I don’t have to correct it ..you don’t have that right yet!), give it exercise time in the yard on lunge line or in fenced yard..but other than that.. LEASH , (yes..leash in the house too.)
Do no training at all, just fun exercise and maybe throw some toys for fun, leash the dog if you don’t have a fence outside. But DO NOT leave the yard, AT ALL.

No car rides, no other dogs, (unless crated beside them), no pet stores, no WALKS even, nothing but you and household family, your home, your yard. (Unless of course the dog needs to go to the vetinarian)
Believe me dogs can live two weeks without walks. Walks are stressful for there is so much coming at you and your dog! And the dog has no clue who you are yet. The dog may react to something and we start correcting it with the leash and we just installed a VERY STRESSFUL moment to the dog in what should be a fun and learning walk.

TEACH the dog by doing the shut down, that YOU are the one to look to, that you are now here for the dog! He can trust in you and look to you for guidance. Then you can venture out into new situations one at a time, the dog knows he can trust in his new humans and can relax under the fair guidance of his new leaders!

In the house take the dog out only for about 20-30 minute intervals , post excercise/yard times.,and ALWAYS on a leash when in the house or in an unfenced yard. Exercise is important! Running and free time are stress relievers, but don’t set your dog up for failure, make exercise and yard time fun and relaxing and tiring!

Then PUT THE DOG AWAY. let it absorb and think and relax. Ignore crying or barking, just like a new born baby, he must find security when you are not right there, and if you run to him each time he will think barking and crying will get your attention.

I do not introduce resident dogs for these two weeks, they can be side by side in the crates, (not nose to nose for they can feel defensive) . Some dogs will bond instantly with the other dogs if we don’t bond FIRST with the dog, and this can lead to some other issues, as the dog will look to the other dog(s) for guidance and not YOU!

Literally in two weeks you will see a change in the dog and begin to see its honest and true personality. Just like a house guest.. they are well behaved and literally shut down and “polite” themselves these first few weeks, then post this time, they relax and the true personality begins to shine thru.

So, please,, if nothing else for your new dog, give it the time to LEARN YOU as you are learning who they are! This method works on shy dogs, confident dogs, abuse cases, chained dogs that come in, rowdy dogs, all temperaments!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Here is a very helpful and insightful link for you to read titled "The Groundwork to establish pack structure with adult dogs"
http://leerburg.com/pdf/packstructure.pdf

Also, this is the 2 week shutdown method..you don't have to follow it word for word as each dog will be different, but it also provides helpful insight and tips:

The First Two Weeks – Give’em a Break! WHY?

If I could stress one of the biggest errors people make with new dogs and foster dogs it is rushing the dog into the new world so fast . This shut down gives the dog a chance to say “ahhh” take a breath and restart into its new world.

From people I have helped I hear;
"I introduced her to 15 people the first day I had her!" ;" he was a bit leery but seems to like my other 3 dogs" ; "she went everywhere with me "
All in the first few days of the new home..... (!!!)

two weeks later we hear;
" I think we will have to rehome the new dog" "the new dog barked and nipped at my kid" - "we had a dog fight" ; “the new dog barked at me for moving him off the couch”

Ok, folks, here it comes, some feel this is extreme, why? I really do not know.
But when bringing in a new dog, post finding, adoption, buying, etc, Give it time to adjust to you and your family and the dogs in the new environment.
Just as if it were a new baby or puppy, we wouldn’t think of rushing out with a baby or puppy, yet with older pups and dogs we just expect them to take our lives in all at once!

TWO WEEKS - "shut down"
For the first two weeks, (sometimes even longer) a dog takes in the new environment, who is the top person, or animal, who ARE these people!? By pushing a dog too fast, and throwing too much at the dog we look like we are not the leaders,and the dog can feel it MUST defend itself , as the leader is surely no one he has met so far!

We coo , coodle, drag the dog to home to home to person to person, and the dog has NO idea who we are. We correct for things it doesn’t understand, we talk in a new human language using words he does not know.

A key thing to remember is "this is the dating period NOT the honeymoon"
When you first met your "spouse or significant other”, you were on your best behavior, you were not relaxed enough to be all of yourself, were you?
Just think of the things you do physically once you get to KNOW a person,
you wouldn’t run up to a stranger and hug them and squeeze them!
Imagine, if on the first date, this new person, was all over you touching you and having their friends hug you and pat you on the head, and jostle your shoulders, looked in your mouth then he whisked you off to another strangers home and they did the same thing.

Would you think this person normal and SAFE? Wouldn’t you feel invaded and begin to get a bit snarky or defensive yourself? Wouldn’t you think to push these people away for obviously your date is out of their mind, as they aren’t going to save you from these weirdoes!!
Yet we do this very thing to our dogs, and then get upset or worried that they aren’t relaxed and accepting of EVERYTHING instantly!

By shutting down the dog, it gives the dog TIME to see you , meet YOU, hear and take in the new sounds and smells of your home and all the people in it. In the 1st two weeks;
.
Crate the dog in a room by itself if possible.(Believe me, dogs are sensory animals, they know more than you think without seeing it).
Leash the dog (so I don’t have to correct it ..you don’t have that right yet!), give it exercise time in the yard on lunge line or in fenced yard..but other than that.. LEASH , (yes..leash in the house too.)
Do no training at all, just fun exercise and maybe throw some toys for fun, leash the dog if you don’t have a fence outside. But DO NOT leave the yard, AT ALL.

No car rides, no other dogs, (unless crated beside them), no pet stores, no WALKS even, nothing but you and household family, your home, your yard. (Unless of course the dog needs to go to the vetinarian)
Believe me dogs can live two weeks without walks. Walks are stressful for there is so much coming at you and your dog! And the dog has no clue who you are yet. The dog may react to something and we start correcting it with the leash and we just installed a VERY STRESSFUL moment to the dog in what should be a fun and learning walk.

TEACH the dog by doing the shut down, that YOU are the one to look to, that you are now here for the dog! He can trust in you and look to you for guidance. Then you can venture out into new situations one at a time, the dog knows he can trust in his new humans and can relax under the fair guidance of his new leaders!

In the house take the dog out only for about 20-30 minute intervals , post excercise/yard times.,and ALWAYS on a leash when in the house or in an unfenced yard. Exercise is important! Running and free time are stress relievers, but don’t set your dog up for failure, make exercise and yard time fun and relaxing and tiring!

Then PUT THE DOG AWAY. let it absorb and think and relax. Ignore crying or barking, just like a new born baby, he must find security when you are not right there, and if you run to him each time he will think barking and crying will get your attention.

I do not introduce resident dogs for these two weeks, they can be side by side in the crates, (not nose to nose for they can feel defensive) . Some dogs will bond instantly with the other dogs if we don’t bond FIRST with the dog, and this can lead to some other issues, as the dog will look to the other dog(s) for guidance and not YOU!

Literally in two weeks you will see a change in the dog and begin to see its honest and true personality. Just like a house guest.. they are well behaved and literally shut down and “polite” themselves these first few weeks, then post this time, they relax and the true personality begins to shine thru.

So, please,, if nothing else for your new dog, give it the time to LEARN YOU as you are learning who they are! This method works on shy dogs, confident dogs, abuse cases, chained dogs that come in, rowdy dogs, all temperaments!
Thanks a lot for your good post. I appreciate that you took the time to write all that good stuff. It was kind of what I had planned to do, but not in that drastic way that you described. But it make completely sense. I have looked forward to this dog for months so in my mind it is already my dog but she don't really know anything about me yet and the comparison you made about a first date is really useful here. I will definitely follow your advice, although I think i will have to do some walks as we live in an apartment and have no yard at all but there is a huge park right outside the door and I think that no exercise for 2 weeks would also be a disaster. But thanks a lot I really appreciate it.
 

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All good information here. Since you have to take the dog from the car to the house anyways, i wonder if it wouldnt be a good idea to walk it once to let it unwind and get some energy out before you bring it in and put it in a crate. That way it will be tired and less stressed so you can help it by putting it in the crate in a quiet place where it will eventually calm down and rest. It has been on a plane and left its family, it will be an excited mess, need to drain that before bringing it into the home. No interactions on the walk, just a brisk walk to drain energy. i brought my puppy home late and night so this worked perfect for me, i was the only one out in the neighborhood. Good luck! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
All good information here. Since you have to take the dog from the car to the house anyways, i wonder if it wouldnt be a good idea to walk it once to let it unwind and get some energy out before you bring it in and put it in a crate. That way it will be tired and less stressed so you can help it by putting it in the crate in a quiet place where it will eventually calm down and rest. It has been on a plane and left its family, it will be an excited mess, need to drain that before bringing it into the home. No interactions on the walk, just a brisk walk to drain energy. i brought my puppy home late and night so this worked perfect for me, i was the only one out in the neighborhood. Good luck! :)
Yes this was what I planned to do. Then she will be tired when we go home and not go amok first thing :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
ZeldaRules, I read the PDF from leerburg you linked to yesterday. Ended up buying his streaming DVD on the subject, and watching it in the late evening. Really good stuff. I picked up my girl this morning and started the ground work. I can really see how that is very useful. I'm glad you send me in that direction. She is a very nice girl, no problems at all. Went for a long walk after we got home and she heeled perfectly the whole time as long as I walked really fast/jogged. I don't think she want to walk too slowly as it's freezing cold at the moment. Have not even touched her yet, and my wife and son haven't met her. She's just staying in the crate and then coming out for walks. She is perfect in there though and haven't made as much as a sound, so I think she will go quickly through the ground work. Thank you!
 
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