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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
The vet didn't mention crating at all. She said to give the anti-inflammatory medicine once a day, keep activity to a minimum, with no long walks, and no running, jumping, or going up and down stairs for 14 days, at which point we should see some progress, i.e. reduced limping and favoring of that leg. If not, then Mocha has to get referred to orthopedics.

It must be different for dogs than people. My daughter tore her ACL playing soccer (astro turf) and after the surgery, if I remember right, she was able to walk on the leg but had to get physical therapy to get full motion of the knee back. Of course she was told not do anything strenuous like running, jumping sports, etc but she was able to walk on it.

Today, I've been picking her up and carrying her up and down the deck stairs...I'm so happy she only weighs 60 pounds LOL
 

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Yes, if she has surgery, she will need rehab. I've got a friend who's "Ilka from another mother" had CCL surgery a few days ago, and a couple more friend's whos dogs have had them, and after rehab, gone back into not only regular activities but competitive sports.

Using an x-pen or baby gates to keep her in one room would probably suffice to keep her moving around to a minimum, and of course leashed in the yard when pottying.
 

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I know that keeping her crated all the time sounds a lot like punishment but it's so easy for a dog who normally gets a lot of exercise to deal with restricted exercise (especially since they aren't sure exactly what is going on with the ligament nor how serious it is) and I know (unfortunately) of several cases of partial tears that turned into complete ruptures and ended up needing surgery thought he could be out of the crate and safe in a single room.

One dog charged past an owner and ran up a set of stairs and finished tearing the ligament which had only a partial tear up to that point.

Another Dobe, a bitch normally well trained and very polite had a partial ACL rupture and they were trying to avoid surgery. She was being kept in a downstairs room and crated when someone wasn't there with her. They were alternating staying with her at night and had been crating her at night just so she didn't do something like trying to get on the bed (which she was not allowed on and was good about not trying to get on beds)

They were never entirely sure exactly what happened but the wife thinks that she fell asleep reading and the bitch wasn't crated and the woman woke up to a dog screaming in pain. They took her into emergency and emergency sedated her and reached her orthopedist who agreed to meet them at the clinic the first thing in the morning (ie 6:00am).

Turned out that whatever she did not only completely tore the ACL but also pulled her achilles tendon loose from it's mooring. So she ended up with two very expensive surgeries and a really long long recovery with a ton of rehab and restricted exercise.

I'd think that just to prevent the unlikely accident for stuff like that I'd rather crate than take any chances.

Poor Mocha--sometimes life just ain't fair....

dobebug
 

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keep activity to a minimum, with no long walks, and no running, jumping, or going up and down stairs for 14 days

Did the Vet forget she's a Doberman ? :grin2:

I have to agree with Bug on this one - It is almost impossible to keep a Dober down - They will hear something - see something and the next thing they are running to a window or jumping up to investigate whats going on . then there is that " Pent " up energy = and they can turn into the zoomies in a heart beat , sorry Mocha - we are just protecting you dear girl
Lots of love and hugs Mocha :2smile:
 

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Discussion Starter #25
We're cautiously and hopefully optimistic; she's no longer holding the leg off the floor or limping so I don't know if it's the anti-inflammatory meds doing their work or the rest, or a combination of the two. The hard part is going to be keeping up with this regimen and not letting our guard down or getting careless.

She's already resigned herself to being carried up and down the deck stairs, when we go out the door and get to the stairs, she stops and looks up at me and then she's not too thrilled about having to go potty on a leash. When she goes #2 she looks back over her shoulder up at me like "really, dad, can't a girl have some privacy?"

And then I have to be right there afterwards to make sure she doesn't do that grass kicking/scratching thing she likes to do after doing her business.

My biggest worry is, that we go through all of this for a couple of months, then when she's no longer on leash she decides to have a case of the zoomies or runs up or down the stairs and re-injures the leg again. I'll talk to the vet about what we can do as far as physical therapy when that time comes, maybe we need to slowly start with short walks and gradually build up to longer walks to build up the muscles again...playing fetch is out of the question for sure.

Oh well, one day at a time.
 

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Sorry to hear about the new issue with Mocha.
I have a issue with Redboy that causes limping. It has been several months now since a limp and i have been increasing his activity and everything is going normal. The one thing i do is avoid cold starts with him. I also give him a fairly rough massage and stretch every morning before he gets out of bed.
Good luck
 

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We're cautiously and hopefully optimistic; she's no longer holding the leg off the floor or limping so I don't know if it's the anti-inflammatory meds doing their work or the rest, or a combination of the two. The hard part is going to be keeping up with this regimen and not letting our guard down or getting careless.

She's already resigned herself to being carried up and down the deck stairs, when we go out the door and get to the stairs, she stops and looks up at me and then she's not too thrilled about having to go potty on a leash. When she goes #2 she looks back over her shoulder up at me like "really, dad, can't a girl have some privacy?"

And then I have to be right there afterwards to make sure she doesn't do that grass kicking/scratching thing she likes to do after doing her business.

My biggest worry is, that we go through all of this for a couple of months, then when she's no longer on leash she decides to have a case of the zoomies or runs up or down the stairs and re-injures the leg again. I'll talk to the vet about what we can do as far as physical therapy when that time comes, maybe we need to slowly start with short walks and gradually build up to longer walks to build up the muscles again...playing fetch is out of the question for sure.

Oh well, one day at a time.
Do you have any sports medicine/rehab vets near you, TN? If so, you might consider contacting them. The rehab facilities often do things like underwater treadmills and prescribe at-home exercises (things like balance work on fitbones) to help with rehab. They can be really amazing.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Do you have any sports medicine/rehab vets near you, TN? If so, you might consider contacting them. The rehab facilities often do things like underwater treadmills and prescribe at-home exercises (things like balance work on fitbones) to help with rehab. They can be really amazing.
Not that I know of but I will check into it for sure.

While doing some research, I read that some dogs, when they tear their CCL, will limp for a while then the limp goes away, leading the owner to think the injury has resolved itself but in reality, with the CCL being torn, the dog starts developing arthritis and other issues that will over time, lead to lameness.
 

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Apparently, too, it is pretty common that they start having problems with the opposite leg, even once the original problem has healed—something about the extra stress they put on the other leg attempting to compensate for the injury to the first.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Apparently, too, it is pretty common that they start having problems with the opposite leg, even once the original problem has healed—something about the extra stress they put on the other leg attempting to compensate for the injury to the first.
Yes I read that too...50-60% of dogs that tear one side will end up tearing the CCL in the other leg. Having to pay for 2 surgeries plus another 8-12 weeks of recovery time on top of that...scary thought.
 

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TN- When we were taking Kasia and Ali to the VCA - They had a Therapy room - There was a tread mill in this big tank , they would get the dog in there and then fill it with water to float the dog some - take the weight off there legs and then start the tread mill - I asked about it one day , it's for dogs that has some sort of leg , muscle injury - Was just thinking about that and wondered if something like that could help Mocha .
 

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Capri over-stretched a tendon on the outside of her wrist (I've forgotten its name.) Both her wrists were a bit funky, but one got injured enough her wrist was bowed out and we worried that if it got worse, she would end up walking on the side of her foot. So she had a custom-made brace and physical therapy.

The water tank is really cool. They can run the treadmill part at different speeds, and also fill the water to different depths. The tank is walk-in and starts empty. The sides are clear, so the techs can see from the side how the dog is moving, even take a video of it if they need to study their movement more closely. Capri tended to roll her eyes a bit when the water started coming in, but adapted to the moving treadmill amazingly quickly.

They also had inflatable balls and platforms of different shapes for her to stand on while they rocked them back and forth in various directions (front legs only, in her case), and worked her over ground poles in different configurations (like what they call cavaletti for horses) It was very interesting, and quite hands-on for the owner—at least in Capri's case it was easier for everyone if I was involved—maybe some dogs are different.

Pricey, definitely. Then she started in with multiple surgeries for blockages—it was a very expensive year, something like $20-25 thousand medical bills alone, when all was said and done.
 

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Our girl Brandy had a TPLO. If you need to look into that option eventually and have questions, let me know. It was a while ago, but everything worked out well for her. Hope it doesn't come to that though and she's feeling better soon!
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Our girl Brandy had a TPLO. If you need to look into that option eventually and have questions, let me know. It was a while ago, but everything worked out well for her. Hope it doesn't come to that though and she's feeling better soon!
Hopefully it doesn't come to that, not sure my back could take many more trips up and down the deck stairs carrying this girl LOL. Right now she's doing a lot better, no limping at all but then we're watching her like a hawk and no stairs, no running, no playing, only walking between rooms in the house and very short walks on leash in the backyard to go potty.
 

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Hopefully it doesn't come to that, not sure my back could take many more trips up and down the deck stairs carrying this girl LOL. Right now she's doing a lot better, no limping at all but then we're watching her like a hawk and no stairs, no running, no playing, only walking between rooms in the house and very short walks on leash in the backyard to go potty.
Hope she continues to improve! These dogs!!
 
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Discussion Starter #39
I have no idea how we didn't notice this before but last weekend, I saw that one of Mocha's toes was flat and stretched out, and longer than the other ones. I thought maybe she was doing that on purpose to help with stability on the hurt leg but I sent the pics to our vet and they want me to bring her back in Friday morning so they can take more x-rays and check the foot. When I brought her in the first time, they were concentrating on the leg, thinking like I was that it was an injury to the CCL or other ligament/tendon around the knee area. I wish I could say the toe is a recent development but I can't say for sure because all this time I've been worrying about her knee area but I'm thinking I would have noticed something like this earlier. And I remember when she first came up limping, I carefully checked, felt and looked at every part of her left leg and foot, and I know I would have immediately seen something like this.

Here's a pic of her right back foot


And here's the left rear one


I'm no vet, but to me, that looks like maybe a dislocated toe or an injury to a tendon or ligament in or on the toe or surrounding area.

Edited to add - her toe is only like that when she's standing. When she lays down, it looks normal.
 

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I hope that toe problem is what is going on—I mean, I hate to hope that something is wrong with her toe, but when you consider the alternative…

Seems like I remember a cat limping on a front foot—he was standing with his wrist dropped down a bit and I thought it was a wrist problem—the vet said he was doing that to keep weight off his toe. A broken toe showed up on his X-ray. If I looked closely I could see a toe sticking out.

I don't know how a dog would stand if it were a back toe—maybe with his hock more flexed than usual and his foot slightly forward from where he would normally place it??
 
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