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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So for interest's sake, the Roan state community college arena was hosting an AKC agility trial and I decided it'd be a good place to get Zeus out and around well behaved dogs for a change. Being a spectator I felt a bit out of place. There were plenty of nice people there, however, like every competitive sport, most people were very focused on competing rather than socializing. (Being a hunter/jumper horse girl, I totally understand!) I saw about 5 or 6 dobermans there and was wondering if anyone on here attended? I only saw a couple runs, but there were quite a few dobie competitors.

One thing that ercked me being there was this one woman who owned two dobes. Only one of them was competing. I may be totally wrong about what I saw or inferred, but her girl messed up the teeter and instead of finishing it (like most people who messed up did) She grabbed her dog by the collar and 'appeared' to be angrily dragging her out of the ring. Again it could've just been me misinterpreting, but everyone there was so loud and positive even when their dog messed up and she gave a far different vibe. As she walked passed me with her two, she also 'checked out' my large, floppy eared obviously BYB boy and gave a rather dirty look. Almost everyone who passed at least smiled or came over to pet Zeus, but I was fairly shocked to feel I was being "judged" by not having a well-bred dobe. It's almost as if I wished he had a sign saying, "I've been thankfully rescued to a wonderful home who completely disagrees with everything a BYB stands for". I understand somewhat why I myself wouldn't applaud someone with an obvious BYB produced dog, but you never know the story on every dog, and it certainly isn't worth judgement without appropriate cause and history. :rolleyesww:
 

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Yes, going to trials you will see all kinds of things. I have been to a few as a specatator and a couple others to run in a match. I was amazed at some of the things I saw. The one lady was yelling at her dog to down on the table in a way that really pissed me off! Then when she was running along the dog walk and tripped and fell. My daughter and I couldnt hold in our laugh and say pay backs a *itch! Some people were nice some people werent. We have stopped doing agility but I still plan on taking Kyrah to some trials just to be around all the rukus.
 

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Stopping the run and taking the dog off the course is something that happens if the dog is running out of control or if the dog has a problem with contacts/starts/etc.. I have a problem with Bacchus and his starts. He creeps or even starts to run before I can give him the signal. So I motion to the judge we are done and I take him off the course. I tell him walk of shame and he doesn't get to do what he enjoys. Some handlers will remove the dog if it blows a contact. This can actually be a safety issue. The dogs do understand when they are taken off. With Bacchus when we come back for our second class that day he has gotten the message and behaves. Also when you do remove your dog you try to do it quickly so that the judging moves along and doesn't get behind. Some handlers will continue no matter how badly the dog is doing. Multiple dropped bars, blown weaves and every contact missed and they continue with the dog running the course. Me.......as long as Bacchus is trying we stay. If he is in one of his Banzai Bacchus moods, we leave.
 

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It is hard to say what you saw, I know some handlers will take their dog off the run/course by the collar.Thats` a correction for that dog.

I have never done that. I think twice in 3 years I left the course but only because Tamora was sort of picking her own course:)but even than I did not take her by the collar and yank her off, we just walked off quietly and I took her back to her crate and tried to figure out what went wrong and how to fix it. The way I look at it, they are just dogs and really do not want to piss you off. Things jsut happen and there will always be more runs.

As far as seeming like you were ignored, sometimes handlers get involved with what they are doing and really don`t even see others. I would have loved to meet you and Zeus.

Another thing I decided when I started competing was, that I didn`t care if I had a friend in the world at a trial/class/training etc. It was going to be just about me and my dog.
To this day I still think that--however I now do have many agility/obedience friends and am constantly making more. You will too.
 

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To add to what has been posted, when I am in the ring I see or hear nothing going on outside the ring. I am barely aware of the judge and only when he/she is close to our path. When standing outside the ring prior to running, I am concentrating on how we will run the course and keeping away from other dogs and not paying attention to any conversations going on around us. It has nothing to do with ignoring people but is more likely handlers preparing their dogs and themselves for the upcoming run. HTH
 

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To add to what has been posted, when I am in the ring I see or hear nothing going on outside the ring. I am barely aware of the judge and only when he/she is close to our path. When standing outside the ring prior to running, I am concentrating on how we will run the course and keeping away from other dogs and not paying attention to any conversations going on around us. It has nothing to do with ignoring people but is more likely handlers preparing their dogs and themselves for the upcoming run. HTH


I tend to be the same way. I call it being "in the zone".:supergrin:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all for the explanations about leaving the ring etc. Exactly what I was looking for!! It didn't seem to be a necessarily safety issue, the dog just did the teeter instead of going to the next jump. I totally understand taking a dobe out of the ring who has the zoomies!

Like I said, being a hunter/jumper girl, I understand the show mentality. When I'm competing, I block everyone out except for my trainer. However, if I am done competing and standing right next to someone (especially if they had a similar horse aka same breed dog) I wouldn't hesitate to at least say something, and if not I certainly wouldn't give bad looks if the horse wasn't conformationaly up to par.

But thank you all for the responses. I certainly understand more of the reasons for why some people did what they did at the trial :D:D
 

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You never know - she may have been frustrated with her dog's preformance and made a face and you just happened to think she was looking at your dog. Where she may have not even "seen" you. Make sense? Especially if she is having similar issues each run and trying to fix it.
 

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I agree with everything said above.

If Jones messes up an obstacle I tend to move on.. If he is blowing me off and not listening, I will signal the judge and pull Jones off, and to Jones that is the worst thing in the world, he will put the brakes on and I literally have to pick him up to get him off the course...

If it's a bad day I may not even realize how I am looking at people, I am in the zone figuring things out. How to get Jones more focused on me, figuring out my patterns...

Like a lot of people here,
Before we run I am in the zone warming Jones up keeping him focused on me and no other dogs (tough for him)...
During the run, I have almost hit the judge because I have no idea where she was, I am oblivious when I am running it is just me and Jones working... There is no crowd, there is no judge, no other dogs. Just me, Jones, and the obstacles...
After the run (if he runs good AKA listens to me doesn't mean he Q's) I don't even go back through the crowd I find the most open spot and we go for a victory run, and play time... (if it's bad, I have to pull him off the course) we don't play, he goes back to the crate, for some cool down time, and think about next time he "blows me off"
 

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I've seen a handler concentrating so hard on moving her dog on the course she ran into the up end of the teeter. Occasionally a handler will mis-step and take a tumble.

BEWARE---AGILITY CAN BE HAZARDOUS TO YOUR HEALTH :D
I don't even want to think of that... I am pretty short, I think it would be about upper chest "boob" area... OUCH!!!
 
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