Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Sashagirl
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been looking for something more Sasha and I to do a couple times week after work. I would consider her pretty well trained, we did advance training when she was around a year old, she has a great recall and she is trained off leash, but I feel like we need to do something more. I have looked into Schutzhund, agility, and different well known Trainers around the local area, but I am really unsure what the best option for us would be. I figured I would ask all of you before I leap into spending the rest of my paycheck on something that isn't worth it. If anyone has any experience with this or any other suggestions, Sasha and I would greatly appreciate your feedback.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,012 Posts
I'm about to start a Nosework class and I'm really excited about it.
 

·
sadder but wiser girl
Joined
·
9,688 Posts
Sometimes you can really take your lead from things you know your dog is excited to do... for instance, if I were looking for something for Willie to do, I would never choose trying to train him in Search and Rescue, because he just isn't the least bit interested in trying to find things, whereas Annie might be tempted to go look for something IF she were in the mood. Willie doesn't have the visual acuity to do things like flyball or frisbee. However, he absolutely LOVES playing bubbles, and so we made him an obstacle course out of "found" or repurposed objects, and he loves to do his obstacle/agility every day, because it's tied to fun with bubbles. My favorite advanced training was always track & field, (what others are calling "nose work"), which, although we didn't hunt, was very similar to the type of training for both S&R and also police work. It's rewarding for the dogs, and you can begin it on your own, without fancy equipment or trainers... then, if your dog likes it, you can go much further. Have you gotten her CGC? Therapy work is also really satisfying, and you're doing a very nice thing for elderly, kids, the infirm, etc. Oh - another thing - since she's well-trained, some 4-H and other youth groups, scouts, etc, like to have demonstrations by well-trained, well-behaved dogs and their people, to show kids how much dogs can learn, and how a well-mannered dog behaves... have fun!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,012 Posts
My favorite advanced training was always track & field, (what others are calling "nose work")
Just wanted to clarify that Tracking and Nosework are actually two different things. Nosework is a relatively new dog sport.
 

·
Sashagirl
Joined
·
119 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sometimes you can really take your lead from things you know your dog is excited to do... for instance, if I were looking for something for Willie to do, I would never choose trying to train him in Search and Rescue, because he just isn't the least bit interested in trying to find things, whereas Annie might be tempted to go look for something IF she were in the mood. Willie doesn't have the visual acuity to do things like flyball or frisbee. However, he absolutely LOVES playing bubbles, and so we made him an obstacle course out of "found" or repurposed objects, and he loves to do his obstacle/agility every day, because it's tied to fun with bubbles. My favorite advanced training was always track & field, (what others are calling "nose work"), which, although we didn't hunt, was very similar to the type of training for both S&R and also police work. It's rewarding for the dogs, and you can begin it on your own, without fancy equipment or trainers... then, if your dog likes it, you can go much further. Have you gotten her CGC? Therapy work is also really satisfying, and you're doing a very nice thing for elderly, kids, the infirm, etc. Oh - another thing - since she's well-trained, some 4-H and other youth groups, scouts, etc, like to have demonstrations by well-trained, well-behaved dogs and their people, to show kids how much dogs can learn, and how a well-mannered dog behaves... have fun!
Thanks, I'm definitely going to look into nose work/track&field, sounds like something I can do with a little research while saving some money! She is CGC qualified as well, I originally wanted to start bringing her to the hospital I work at to do some of the things that you talked about, but sometimes I need a break from that atmosphere I guess! When we go on walks I can tell her up and she will jump over gates, jump on picnic tables, so I know there is something else she needs, but with buying a Holter, new collars, $70 for a bag of ACANA, and vet bills I really don't want to jump into spending$$ on something we aren't sure of so I really appreciate the suggestion.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,441 Posts
With her being CGC certified it would not be a great leap to get her Therapy certified. You can work with an organization called READing Paws, children read to dogs without the pressure. great for kids who struggle with reading. You can also visit libraries during story time
 

·
sadder but wiser girl
Joined
·
9,688 Posts
Just wanted to clarify that Tracking and Nosework are actually two different things. Nosework is a relatively new dog sport.
I guess this is one of the reasons I don't like "labels" ... because the nose work concept isn't new, but didn't have a name 50 years ago when my grandfather taught me... he was so innovative, and had such a creative way to keep dogs happy and thinking... but he never gave the techniques 'names' per se - just wasn't his style. He simply said keep teaching your dogs new things all the time, because they love to learn, and it keeps them vital and enthusiastic. So I don't really know what the "proper" or current names for things are, because I'm still 12 in my mind! :roflmao:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
22,012 Posts
I guess this is one of the reasons I don't like "labels" ... because the nose work concept isn't new, but didn't have a name 50 years ago when my grandfather taught me... he was so innovative, and had such a creative way to keep dogs happy and thinking... but he never gave the techniques 'names' per se - just wasn't his style. He simply said keep teaching your dogs new things all the time, because they love to learn, and it keeps them vital and enthusiastic. So I don't really know what the "proper" or current names for things are, because I'm still 12 in my mind! :roflmao:
Nosework as a sport was developed recently by someone who's been training scent detection dogs (bombs, drugs, etc.) for a long time. It's pretty exciting, since it's set up as a sport to be very "reactive dog friendly."

I think your grandfather sounds totally awesome.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lolonurse

·
Got mutt?
Joined
·
13,842 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,230 Posts
We've got the CGG /TDI thing too. Gotta be honest, unless you are really low key and mellow the therapy thing is not the most interesting thing to actually DO. (no offense to those who do it). We recently found a lure coursing guy around here. Your dobe isnt gonna beat the greyhounds, so it's a non competitive thing, but cool to try out for fun.
 

·
sadder but wiser girl
Joined
·
9,688 Posts
Sashagirl - When my sisters and cousins and I were kids, my grandfather used to train his dogs to jump over us - people loved to watch that - we would become human hurdles, on all fours, with just one of us, or up to all 5 of us crouching together - the dogs loved it, and people thought it was a hoot. We have an obstacle-type set-up in our yard, made from left-over lumber, a found pallet, an old bench, a hula hoop, etc - we use it like an agility course and obstacle course all in one, and change the order around every few weeks to keep it interesting. Dogs don't care if you get expensive equipment, or just win it, as long as it's fun.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top