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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an 8 year old Black/Tan dobie that has to now go to a new home. He has a past history of extreme aggressive behavior, and now we have a 7 month old baby in the house. Recently we had another episode of his aggressive behavior, and we cannot take the risks involved in keeping him.

99% of the time he is a fun loving, friendly dog. That other 1% becomes scary. He has 3 human bite incidents, and we've tried working through all of them with many different methods, including work with UC Davis Vet Hospital. We have had some success with improving his behavior, but this most recent event was the final straw. Our vet has recommended euthanasia, but I want to make sure I exhaust every other available option before going that route, as he has been a member of our family for 8 years. Unfortunately, keeping him in our home IS NOT an option

Small animals, loud noises (fireworks, etc.) are his main triggers. When you try to correct him when he is agitated is when he becomes human aggressive. Full vet, medical, and the UC Davis reports are available to anyone that is interested in trying to rehab him.

I DON NOT want to euthanize him, but short of a miracle with someone adopting him and trying to rehab him, we will have no other options. Are there any rescues or people who specialize in aggressive dogs?? He really is a lovely dog 99% of the time.

Any info would be greatly appreciated. Time is of the essence!!

Thanks

Alfred
 

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terriorist entertainer
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I'm really really sorry, but from the information you've given us, I think your vet has given you good sound advice that he should be PTS. He is too much of a liability to rehome with a three bite history, and unfortunately his age also works against him as it is hard enough to find social and gentle seniors good loving homes. :(

This sort of situation makes me so sad :(
 

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u mad?
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This is not a good situation.

A rescue will not take him because of his history - they would be liable. Do you really think that you could rehome him and feel okay with it? If I was in your shoes and rehoming him caused someone to get hurt I would feel so guilty.

I can't imagine the thought of euthanizing my dog but if he was a legitimate risk to humans than it may be your only option.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This is not a good situation.

A rescue will not take him because of his history - they would be liable. Do you really think that you could rehome him and feel okay with it? If I was in your shoes and rehoming him caused someone to get hurt I would feel so guilty.

I can't imagine the thought of euthanizing my dog but if he was a legitimate risk to humans than it may be your only option.
That's exactly what we are feeling. We would feel absolutely horrible. Our only hope is that there is someone out there specializing in aggressive dogs that might want to try to rehab him knowing his past history. We would by no means whatsoever just give him to a new home. This would require an experienced handler with the right situation.
 

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If you properly use a pinch collar, you can correct his behavior pretty easily. A dog only knows 2 things, what you teach it to do and what you allow it to do. Don't allow it to be aggressive towards anybody/anything.

Have somebody make a loud noise next to him or introduce to a small animal and the moment he snaps or has an incliniation to snap yank the on the leash and pinch him. Shock collars also work. Make sure you verbaly mark it as bad with en "eh eh" or "no.'

Also, most serious working dog trainers can help.

Good Luck!
 

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If you properly use a pinch collar, you can correct his behavior pretty easily. A dog only knows 2 things, what you teach it to do and what you allow it to do. Don't allow it to be aggressive towards anybody/anything.

Have somebody make a loud noise next to him or introduce to a small animal and the moment he snaps or has an incliniation to snap yank the on the leash and pinch him. Shock collars also work. Make sure you verbaly mark it as bad with en "eh eh" or "no.'

Also, most serious working dog trainers can help.

Good Luck!
I'm sorry, but I think this is very dangerous and wrong advice for a dog that comes back up the lead when corrected. IMHO armchair advice like this is quite wrong.
 

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u mad?
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If you properly use a pinch collar, you can correct his behavior pretty easily. A dog only knows 2 things, what you teach it to do and what you allow it to do. Don't allow it to be aggressive towards anybody/anything.

Have somebody make a loud noise next to him or introduce to a small animal and the moment he snaps or has an incliniation to snap yank the on the leash and pinch him. Shock collars also work. Make sure you verbaly mark it as bad with en "eh eh" or "no.'

Also, most serious working dog trainers can help.

Good Luck!
This dog has had three incidents of biting humans (Edit: Read "a past history of extreme aggressive behavior") and the family is worried for the safety of an infant. I don't know your experience but I agree with Austradali that this is TERRIBLE advice and what you suggested is just asking for trouble.
 

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If you properly use a pinch collar, you can correct his behavior pretty easily. A dog only knows 2 things, what you teach it to do and what you allow it to do. Don't allow it to be aggressive towards anybody/anything.

Have somebody make a loud noise next to him or introduce to a small animal and the moment he snaps or has an incliniation to snap yank the on the leash and pinch him. Shock collars also work. Make sure you verbaly mark it as bad with en "eh eh" or "no.'

Also, most serious working dog trainers can help.

Good Luck!

I must respectfully but emphatically disagree.

The OP states that the dog's human aggression instances were in the presence of a correction. Why on earth would more corrections be the answer?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
What a shame. He is a beautiful boy.
Thank you very much. Unfortunately, we know what the answer is going to be, we were just hoping against hope that there MIGHT be some other alternative. He really has been a loving family member, and I wish I had the answers to his problems. The advice given by Lulu is not a viable option. We have worked extensively with some of the best behavior experts in the nation (UC Davis Vet), but the problems still persist, although they are somewhat improving. The birth of our daughter makes continued work impossible. The risks are too great.

Thank you for everyone's posts. We are going to hold out until Monday, please pray for us!
 

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I must respectfully but emphatically disagree.

The OP states that the dog's human aggression instances were in the presence of a correction. Why on earth would more corrections be the answer?


I read it as he worked with the vet, not with a trainer.

I will agree its armchair advice as in i havent seen or worked with the dog.

This is the most tried and true way however.
 

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u mad?
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Thank you very much. Unfortunately, we know what the answer is going to be, we were just hoping against hope that there MIGHT be some other alternative. He really has been a loving family member, and I wish I had the answers to his problems. The advice given by Lulu is not a viable option. We have worked extensively with some of the best behavior experts in the nation (UC Davis Vet), but the problems still persist, although they are somewhat improving. The birth of our daughter makes continued work impossible. The risks are too great.

Thank you for everyone's posts. We are going to hold out until Monday, please pray for us!
The best option is rarely the easy one. I'm sorry.
((hugs)) to you and your family.
 

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Sea Hag
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Our only hope is that there is someone out there specializing in aggressive dogs that might want to try to rehab him knowing his past history.
Realistically, the people who have the skills to deal with this kind of dog aren't going to be interested in rehabbing, most especially one that's 8 years old.

It's a hard choice, I know-but euthanasia is the only choice you have if you can't keep the dog yourself. Are you willing to take the chance on the dog biting someone in a new home and getting sued for everything you own? That's the kind of liability you take on by placing a dog with a known bite record.
 

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Thank you very much. Unfortunately, we know what the answer is going to be, we were just hoping against hope that there MIGHT be some other alternative. He really has been a loving family member, and I wish I had the answers to his problems. The advice given by Lulu is not a viable option. We have worked extensively with some of the best behavior experts in the nation (UC Davis Vet), but the problems still persist, although they are somewhat improving. The birth of our daughter makes continued work impossible. The risks are too great.

Thank you for everyone's posts. We are going to hold out until Monday, please pray for us!

It's a very hard decision when we love our dobes so much. You are making the right one, though. At 8 years old, it really is your only option. Praying for your peace of heart and His comfort for you and family.
 

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If you properly use a pinch collar, you can correct his behavior pretty easily. A dog only knows 2 things, what you teach it to do and what you allow it to do. Don't allow it to be aggressive towards anybody/anything.

Have somebody make a loud noise next to him or introduce to a small animal and the moment he snaps or has an incliniation to snap yank the on the leash and pinch him. Shock collars also work. Make sure you verbaly mark it as bad with en "eh eh" or "no.'

Also, most serious working dog trainers can help.

Good Luck!
I don't know what your personal experience is Lulu2012 but as other posters have said this is really terrible advice given the information from the OP about the dog. These people have worked with the dog with experts--this is not a puppy or an adolescent dog--it is a grown dog with problems which they've been trying to solve. You don't risk other family members and you particularly don't risk children in this sort of situation.

To the OP--I'm sorry to add another no vote to those who have already said that your vet has given you good advice.

You are not the first and you won't be the last family who had to part with a dog who was a part of the family and sometimes very OK and at other times not.

I know some very good trainers and at least one very good behaviorist who would agree. Sometimes with these dogs there is just something "wrong". And sometimes the very kindest thing you can do for one of them is to give them release from their demons--euthanasia is sometimes the very kindest thing you can do for a dog you obviously care a great deal about.
 

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If you properly use a pinch collar, you can correct his behavior pretty easily. A dog only knows 2 things, what you teach it to do and what you allow it to do. Don't allow it to be aggressive towards anybody/anything.

Have somebody make a loud noise next to him or introduce to a small animal and the moment he snaps or has an incliniation to snap yank the on the leash and pinch him. Shock collars also work. Make sure you verbaly mark it as bad with en "eh eh" or "no.'

Also, most serious working dog trainers can help.

Good Luck!
Any dog that has the kind of triggers the OP has described is NOT a good candidate for this kind of training method. It is extremely likely that this dog will redirect his aggression towards the person causing him discomfort. This is exactly how untrained people get injured.

OP do not use this method with the dog you have.
 

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The only other thing that is worth trying is to contact his breeder, if they would take him.
TBH...I really wouldn't want him to go there, but the breeder should be notified, if only so they can have the feedback of the temperment of what they have produced.

He is a beautiful looking boy and I really feel for you having to make such a hard decision. But safety for all has to be the first priority.
 

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What a hard situation to be in.

Besides being a liability should he bite again in light of his history there is an angle that I rarely see mentioned that say even in the event you were able to rehome him with someone willing to work with him you will never really know what happens behind closed doors.

Years ago my dh & I tried to rescue a jack russell mix cold out of a pound that did absolutely not a shred of temperament testing(so we found out later). I was so smitten with this dog I waited w/a lawn chair for the pound to open to be 1st in line for him.

We *just* beat a lady and her 2 thuggish sons "in line" for this dog. She and her sons threw a ripe fit "I'm so tired of this happening to us! Someone always beats us to the dog."
The gravity of their choice of words didn't hit me until later.

Not long after we had him fully vetted discovered that we were WAY in over our heads as he completely jekyl & hyded, nailed our daughter on the foot while we were watching tv. One of us shifting had set him off.

The last straw was when he lunged up to bite her in the face when she came up to kiss me goodnight. We walked on eggshells with him for 2 weeks and never got a chance to bond.

I felt horrible but returned him to the pound to be PTS.

It was then it occured to me, altho it hurt so much to decide his fate in that way, but the demeanor of the group after us who wanted him made me wonder what sort of treatment they would have dealt him....and even if their intent was to keep him as a pet...we're not far from Detroit & the adoption fees for dogs at that shelter are negligible.

My end point being that in making a decision about your dog's future to have their last days be with those they love and know best is a kindness not all dogs will see who are rehomed.

May you be at peace with whatever decision you make.
 

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Sea Hag
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What a hard situation to be in.

Besides being a liability should he bite again in light of his history there is an angle that I rarely see mentioned that say even in the event you were able to rehome him with someone willing to work with him you will never really know what happens behind closed doors.

Years ago my dh & I tried to rescue a jack russell mix cold out of a pound that did absolutely not a shred of temperament testing(so we found out later). I was so smitten with this dog I waited w/a lawn chair for the pound to open to be 1st in line for him.

We *just* beat a lady and her 2 thuggish sons "in line" for this dog. She and her sons threw a ripe fit "I'm so tired of this happening to us! Someone always beats us to the dog."
The gravity of their choice of words didn't hit me until later.

Not long after we had him fully vetted discovered that we were WAY in over our heads as he completely jekyl & hyded, nailed our daughter on the foot while we were watching tv. One of us shifting had set him off.

The last straw was when he lunged up to bite her in the face when she came up to kiss me goodnight. We walked on eggshells with him for 2 weeks and never got a chance to bond.

I felt horrible but returned him to the pound to be PTS.

It was then it occured to me, altho it hurt so much to decide his fate in that way, but the demeanor of the group after us who wanted him made me wonder what sort of treatment they would have dealt him....and even if their intent was to keep him as a pet...we're not far from Detroit & the adoption fees for dogs at that shelter are negligible.

My end point being that in making a decision about your dog's future to have their last days be with those they love and know best is a kindness not all dogs will see who are rehomed.

May you be at peace with whatever decision you make.
This is an excellent point, and creates terrible situations, I saw this played out many times when I worked at a shelter.

Dogs who bite tend to get passed from home to home to home. All too often they wind up in a home where the "solution" is to beat the crap out of the dog-often resulting in the dog being beaten to death.
 
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