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Very poorly handled by police in ALL respects. Somewhere, maybe on this forum, I saw something about signs for your yard that say, somethink like, Dog in Yard, You Do Not Have Permission to Enter. The wording applies to police officers, also, and I believe it was suggested by a police officer.
 

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"Implied Consent" gives the police the right to enter your yard in pursuit of a suspect. As well as shooting your dog if it attacks or threatens the officer.
I am having signs made that say: Private Property, No Tresspassing, and No Implied Consent.
Would the signs stop an officer from entering my property while on a foot pursuit? No, probably not but they would give me legal recourse.
 

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Very poorly handled by police in ALL respects. Somewhere, maybe on this forum, I saw something about signs for your yard that say, somethink like, Dog in Yard, You Do Not Have Permission to Enter. The wording applies to police officers, also, and I believe it was suggested by a police officer.
"Implied Consent" gives the police the right to enter your yard in pursuit of a suspect. As well as shooting your dog if it attacks or threatens the officer.
I am having signs made that say: Private Property, No Tresspassing, and No Implied Consent.
Would the signs stop an officer from entering my property while on a foot pursuit? No, probably not but they would give me legal recourse.
I've thought about putting signs up similar to this, I hope someone here can let everyone know the right info to put on it to keep our animals safe. It would be really useful to me as well. I've heard that having a 'beware of dog' sign is an admission of guilt that you knew your dog was vicious if something ever happens.
 

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I am having trouble with the part when she says "he went back in to his dog house screaming and hollering and eventually died." Eventually? How long was the poor thing bleeding and screaming for before he died? I'm sure this woman doesn't have much money, but there is no excuse for standing by and watching. The poor thing looked like a sweetie.:(
 

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So, let's see if I get this right - in most jurisdictions the police won't conduct a pursuit in a car because they endanger other people on the road. So the criminals are essentially just let go in the hopes they will be caught by other police somewhere else.

Yet they will outright murder your dog to catch a criminal rather than just letting them go in the same hope that they will be caught by other police somewhere else.

There is a difference between being in your yard on implied consent grounds and whether or not they are going to risk taking a life in the pursuit of a criminal.

I hope god is a dog and these moron cops can face their maker some day and explain why a dog’s life was meaningless that day.

Oh, and if indeed they were attacked - what was the nature of their injury that warranted animal assassination?
 

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I don't mean to sound testy, but please keep in mind that when she said "eventually" it may not mean that she just left the dog there for a long time. The cops shot this dog twice and she came out hysterical. It could have been a matter of just moments. If you've ever been through a tragedy sometimes a short time can later seem like forever.

As for the cops shooting this poor dog, I guess I can see where they are coming from legally...but I wonder what kind of shot it was. Maybe in the heat of the moment they just shot but aren't they supposed to have training that might make it possible for a leg shot or something? Still wouldn't have been a great situation but could have turned out better.

What upsets me most was that statement "in self defense and to protect the suspect Really? Screw that, let the dog at 'em!
 

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I'm new here, a new doberman owner, and my last dog was a GSD. I'm also a cop who has had to shoot dogs (in my cases, they were loose and had either attacked or were trying to attack people) and also, when possible, managed to avoid it. I understand both sides of the issue, and I can tell you from my own experience having to do it is an emotional experience especially when it's not the dog's "fault".

Pepper spray sometimes works, but how many of us would expect our dogs to fight through pepper spray to protect us from an intruder? Taser is extremely difficult because both barbs have to hit, they are designed to spread, and dogs are difficult, small, fast moving targets when you know you have a barb spread to deal with. There are cases in which both these options have been successful, and cases in which both these options have failed and officers have received career ending injuries.

I also feel it's disingenuous to expect someone to know whether your dog will bite or not (many owners don't even know what their dog will do when confronting an intruder), or to minimize the power of these dogs. I have seen devastating, life threatening, permanently disabling, and fatal injuries from "family pets".

I have always operated on the belief that it is my duty to do everything possible to avoid shooting a dog on his own property when I am moving through on a suspect chase or track. I have managed to accomplish that despite some downright frightening encounters. I have been fortunate that the initial posturing of the dogs has given me the window of opportunity to find a way out of the situation.

That said, if I found myself facing a charging dog with no way out I would shoot. I would lose sleep over it, I would be emotional about it, but I would do it. Likewise, if officers went through my yard and encountered my GSD or doberman, I would be extremely upset and heartbroken but I would also understand because I've been there and I know how fast things can happen.
 

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I'm new here, a new doberman owner, and my last dog was a GSD. I'm also a cop who has had to shoot dogs (in my cases, they were loose and had either attacked or were trying to attack people) and also, when possible, managed to avoid it. I understand both sides of the issue, and I can tell you from my own experience having to do it is an emotional experience especially when it's not the dog's "fault".

Pepper spray sometimes works, but how many of us would expect our dogs to fight through pepper spray to protect us from an intruder? Taser is extremely difficult because both barbs have to hit, they are designed to spread, and dogs are difficult, small, fast moving targets when you know you have a barb spread to deal with. There are cases in which both these options have been successful, and cases in which both these options have failed and officers have received career ending injuries.

I also feel it's disingenuous to expect someone to know whether your dog will bite or not (many owners don't even know what their dog will do when confronting an intruder), or to minimize the power of these dogs. I have seen devastating, life threatening, permanently disabling, and fatal injuries from "family pets".

I have always operated on the belief that it is my duty to do everything possible to avoid shooting a dog on his own property when I am moving through on a suspect chase or track. I have managed to accomplish that despite some downright frightening encounters. I have been fortunate that the initial posturing of the dogs has given me the window of opportunity to find a way out of the situation.

That said, if I found myself facing a charging dog with no way out I would shoot. I would lose sleep over it, I would be emotional about it, but I would do it. Likewise, if officers went through my yard and encountered my GSD or doberman, I would be extremely upset and heartbroken but I would also understand because I've been there and I know how fast things can happen.
Thanks for sharing, Ricky. I think it's also important to realize this guy was being chased as a suspect in armed robbery. The cops couldn't just not chase him through a yard and let him be caught by a police officer somewhere else. That is running the risk of people getting hurt. Not to sound overly dramatic, but it's entirely possible this guy could've eventually ended up in someone's house and injure/kill a person. Even though I like dogs more than many people I've met, it's about keeping people safe.
 

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Sh**, they should have let the dog take care of the suspect since the dog had already jumped on the suspect. It was only when the officers continued to pursue the suspect in the yard that the dog attacked the officer. Personally, I think the officer should have just waited outside the yard. This same thing happened in Oakland last September: Oakland Officer Shoots Family Dog Dead, Leaves Note - News Story - KTVU San Francisco
It just doesn't seem right that our dogs aren't safe in their own backyards.

A dog is going to react if someone comes running into their yard or their house. My dog would have a fit if someone just walks into my house without my knowledge. Does that mean if they feel threatened that they can shoot her? (I realize they aren't chasing a suspect...I am being a bit cynical/sarcastic but I am sure you get my point.)
 

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I would agree in this particular case I would be tempted to jump up on the fence and let the doberman handle the "arrest". I don't think I'd jump into that yard with a home invasion robbery suspect and a pissed off doberman protecting his own yard. It's possible, however, they were all already in the yard before the dog appeared. News reports don't get into that level of detail.

It's a good observation from the article, however, that the owner says his dog shouldn't be shot "just for barking" when it appears the dog had already "jumped on" the suspect before turning on the officers.

No matter what, it's a sad situation and I feel for the owners.
 

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I'm new here, a new doberman owner, and my last dog was a GSD. I'm also a cop who has had to shoot dogs (in my cases, they were loose and had either attacked or were trying to attack people) and also, when possible, managed to avoid it. I understand both sides of the issue, and I can tell you from my own experience having to do it is an emotional experience especially when it's not the dog's "fault".

Pepper spray sometimes works, but how many of us would expect our dogs to fight through pepper spray to protect us from an intruder? Taser is extremely difficult because both barbs have to hit, they are designed to spread, and dogs are difficult, small, fast moving targets when you know you have a barb spread to deal with. There are cases in which both these options have been successful, and cases in which both these options have failed and officers have received career ending injuries.

I also feel it's disingenuous to expect someone to know whether your dog will bite or not (many owners don't even know what their dog will do when confronting an intruder), or to minimize the power of these dogs. I have seen devastating, life threatening, permanently disabling, and fatal injuries from "family pets".

I have always operated on the belief that it is my duty to do everything possible to avoid shooting a dog on his own property when I am moving through on a suspect chase or track. I have managed to accomplish that despite some downright frightening encounters. I have been fortunate that the initial posturing of the dogs has given me the window of opportunity to find a way out of the situation.

That said, if I found myself facing a charging dog with no way out I would shoot. I would lose sleep over it, I would be emotional about it, but I would do it. Likewise, if officers went through my yard and encountered my GSD or doberman, I would be extremely upset and heartbroken but I would also understand because I've been there and I know how fast things can happen.

Let me just say first that I truly appreciate the hard, dangerous work most peace officers do each day. Many of them are great, selfless people.

Then, just like in any other walk of life, there are those who are less than stellar. There are also gaps in many training programs, and in the hiring process.

I once was stopped on a traffic stop (just a routine checkpoint thing, I had not done anything wrong) and my two Dobermans were in the backseat of my car--one was my working service dog--both were super social and friendly.

Yet, as the officer approached my car to check my documents, he suddenly unsnapped his holster, put his hand on his gun and threatened to shoot my dogs "if they even look like they're going to try to bite [me]."

Um, excuse me? I cannot travel a public highway safely, and submit to a traffic checkpoint like a good law-abiding citizen, without my wonderful, well-trained dogs, CONFINED IN MY OWN CAR, being threatened with being shot?

Ever since that night, I have been much less inclined to have any sympathy with the "cops' side" of dog shootings.
 

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I would agree in this particular case I would be tempted to jump up on the fence and let the doberman handle the "arrest". I don't think I'd jump into that yard with a home invasion robbery suspect and a pissed off doberman protecting his own yard. It's possible, however, they were all already in the yard before the dog appeared. News reports don't get into that level of detail.

It's a good observation from the article, however, that the owner says his dog shouldn't be shot "just for barking" when it appears the dog had already "jumped on" the suspect before turning on the officers.

No matter what, it's a sad situation and I feel for the owners.
Yep, the only detail the article gives is that the suspected "darted into" the yard. I'm sure in this situation the officers have some awareness of surroundings, but you're also on a chase and not able to check out every detail before you continue on. Another thing that just came to mind as I think about it, maybe we should also stop to think that while it can be debated over whether or not the dog should have been shot these officers maybe just maybe they aren't the jerks they are being made out to be. They were chasing a dangerous suspect and putting their lives on the line...maybe we should be more focused on the a-hole who set the stage for this to even happen!
 

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Let me just say first that I truly appreciate the hard, dangerous work most peace officers do each day. Many of them are great, selfless people.

Then, just like in any other walk of life, there are those who are less than stellar. There are also gaps in many training programs, and in the hiring process.

I once was stopped on a traffic stop (just a routine checkpoint thing, I had not done anything wrong) and my two Dobermans were in the backseat of my car--one was my working service dog--both were super social and friendly.

Yet, as the officer approached my car to check my documents, he suddenly unsnapped his holster, put his hand on his gun and threatened to shoot my dogs "if they even look like they're going to try to bite [me]."

Um, excuse me? I cannot travel a public highway safely, and submit to a traffic checkpoint like a good law-abiding citizen, without my wonderful, well-trained dogs, CONFINED IN MY OWN CAR, being threatened with being shot?

Ever since that night, I have been much less inclined to have any sympathy with the "cops' side" of dog shootings.
Fortunately, we don't allow checkpoints in Oregon. In my opinion, they are unconstitutional.

I have worked with cops who are terrified of dogs, just like the regular population.
 

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What a horrible situation this is for the poor Doberman. I feel for the owner in this case and firmly believe the police had NO RIGHT to shoot the dog. It's just a sad, tragic day, and one can only imagine of how it actually occurred. But what's shocking is it states the dog already attacked the suspect but within seconds of the woman reaching the door she heard shots ? Sounds very fishy to me and I feel the officer involved certainly needs to face some sort of discipline. Some Cops or at least the one's I know think they know EVERYTHING and with a Chinese metal enforced badge they can do ANYTHING they choose and somehow justify it because the city is behind them. No disrespect to the officers that actually believe in upholding the law the legal way, but DARN this is a sad story and I feel the officer certainly over reacted to a situation the dog probably had handled. OH I almost forgot to add, the paper states " To protect the suspect from harm " the officer fired at the dog..... ARE YOU SERIOUS ???
 

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Let me just say first that I truly appreciate the hard, dangerous work most peace officers do each day. Many of them are great, selfless people.

Then, just like in any other walk of life, there are those who are less than stellar. There are also gaps in many training programs, and in the hiring process.

I once was stopped on a traffic stop (just a routine checkpoint thing, I had not done anything wrong) and my two Dobermans were in the backseat of my car--one was my working service dog--both were super social and friendly.

Yet, as the officer approached my car to check my documents, he suddenly unsnapped his holster, put his hand on his gun and threatened to shoot my dogs "if they even look like they're going to try to bite [me]."

Um, excuse me? I cannot travel a public highway safely, and submit to a traffic checkpoint like a good law-abiding citizen, without my wonderful, well-trained dogs, CONFINED IN MY OWN CAR, being threatened with being shot?

Ever since that night, I have been much less inclined to have any sympathy with the "cops' side" of dog shootings.
I can see your point, but just like you are making a decision based on that single encounter with a possible jerk cop, maybe he's also encountered similar situations that turned out poorly. Even if people don't have dogs in the car when they are stopped for whatever reason it's gotta be a bit scary to think that the person could wig out and all the sudden you're in a super dangerous situation. I do think his statement was over the top though, so maybe he is a huge jerk that makes many other cops who do deserve sympathy for the cops' side of dog shootings look bad.

While lookwise,the only intimidating thing Maggie might have going for her is the GSD coloring, we did get pulled over once with Maggie in the car (it was the fault of my bf who was driving :p) She went barking/growling crazy and tried to crawl up front to get to the driver's window as the cop walked up. I was turned around holding her back there and this particular cop commented "Wow that dog means business. That's a good dog". He even let the bf off with a verbal warning.
 
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