Doberman Forum : Doberman Breed Dog Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,726 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,726 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Original credit to barb0604 who linked it in another thread. It's great, isn't it! I especially love the part with the dogs in her class, and you can really see all the constant communication going on.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,726 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
We just did a therapy visit today, and after visit number 2, Shanoa did a nice full body shake. We took a little break before we went to the next patient :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,009 Posts
MeadowCat - ThkU very much for the link...I will us the tips.

I always train my dobes to understand, my full sentences.
- now, I can practice "talking dog"...with an understanding
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,009 Posts
MeadowCat - since you posted the GREAT link on "calming signals" I have been watching AMY more closely.

Last week, after midnight...I watched the posted video / and tested my Amy...just afterword:
- when she licked her lips, laying on the leather seat ----> I did to / then she did it again
- I yawn first, she yawns next (so neat...lol)
It was an intriguing moment, we both communicate on the "raw" canine level...very rewarding 4 me.

Watching old girl AMY (for a week) - she exhibits few "CALMING" behaviors.
But today, in our backyard, she turned her head sideways (to ignore me) as she did not want to pee in the rain...and wanted back inside the warm house.
- she may not exhibit the calming signals frequently / but I have a far greater appreciation...for their innocent body language

I have always prided myself, in training my personal dog with phenomenal eye focus & human bond (very pup early), so she will not look away often (or blink, lick lips, yawn, etc.)...when I stare at her or speak.
- if she is waiting for me to instruct and is most happy to comprehend my voice &/or signals

MeadowCat - one of the best information threads, in months (for me)...ThkU again !!
I'm commenting on the Work Ethic? thread tonight / excellent opinions shared, on training & philosophy.
I plan on cross posting, to help both debates...as I see, their connected some.
- just seems like one must be able to accurately read a dobe, before one can train it properly (regardless of the method) http://www.dobermantalk.com/obedience-agility-working-sports/59282-work-ethic.html
 

·
One Lucky Mama!
Joined
·
892 Posts
Meadowcat - Thank you again for posting this awesome link.

I also HIGHLY recommend anyone interested in this topic pick up a copy of Brenda Aloff's Canine Body Language, a Photographic Guide. I am tearing through this book, which is extremely informative and builds off of the same principles which Turid Rugaas and this video cover.

Brenda Aloff also has some other interesting books, DVDs and some free training videos offered on her website which you should check out.

Again, great topic!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,596 Posts
Very interesting, and thank you for posting.

Am I to understand that the more a dog performs calming signals the more they are "stressed" out? And by us humans trying to mimic their calming signals is a way to actually help them "de-stress"?

I apologize if these questions are basic, but this is new to me and I'm looking to learn more.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,134 Posts
i watched this video and tried it out on my boy Luke, he did not offer me a calming signal right away. he seemed more interested in being bossy and trying to play (he likes to do a half play bow while vocalizing and pushing into you to entice play).

eventually, i had him sit, and after a few times offering him a calming signal, he finally licked his lips and looked away.

success! or, at least i'd like to think so. i think i'll utilize these when out on walks to help de-stress him since hes still pretty reactive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,437 Posts
Meadowcat - Thank you again for posting this awesome link.

I also HIGHLY recommend anyone interested in this topic pick up a copy of Brenda Aloff's Canine Body Language, a Photographic Guide. I am tearing through this book, which is extremely informative and builds off of the same principles which Turid Rugaas and this video cover.

Brenda Aloff also has some other interesting books, DVDs and some free training videos offered on her website which you should check out.

Again, great topic!
That is a must-have book IMO!!

Very interesting, and thank you for posting.

Am I to understand that the more a dog performs calming signals the more they are "stressed" out? And by us humans trying to mimic their calming signals is a way to actually help them "de-stress"?

I apologize if these questions are basic, but this is new to me and I'm looking to learn more.

Thanks!
Yes and no. Calming signals are used for communication, initiating play, and diffusing stressful situations.

My foster uses calming signals when she is stressed out and is trying to figure out her environment. When we practice BAT, I look for tongue flicks and head turning because that's her way of telling me the trigger is creating anxiety and/or stress.

My trainer's dog uses calming signals to ease Stella's discomfort, like a friend patting you on the back and telling you "You can do this!". Plenty of dogs do this to help other dogs cope with their stress. ETA: By offering Stella calming signals, he is also letting her know he isn't a threat, which helps her to relax A LOT.

So depending on the situation and the individual dog, calming signals can mean different things.

As far as humans mimicking, I respect when a dog displays calming signals towards me and I take it as them wanting personal space and for me to be less obnoxious. That's just my experience though :)

Hope that offers some clarification.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,726 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I think multiple calming signals are often a sign of increasing stress. For example, Shanoa is not a fan of having her nails dremeled. She tolerates it and sits still, but she often yawns and licks her lips while I'm doing it. I think calming signals function as communication, but I also think sometimes they are a little self-calming. When we do therapy visits, Shanoa often will do the full body shake after the second or third visit. It's her way of diffusing some of the stress of visiting.

I do sometimes offer calming signals to Shanoa when she's hyped up. For me, though, I mostly use the information to read when Shanoa is stressed so that I can take action to reduce her stress.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top