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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Advice please! Viktor has not had one agressive bone in his 6 month old body, that I have ever seen. I have always handled his food, along with kids and toddlers with no problem.

Today, I gave him a bone to chew, and once I felt he had enough, or it was getting too small, I went to take it from him. When reachign for it, he growled at me, and he did it twice! I told him, "what??? what is this?? no way boy, BAD boy" (or something like that) while trying to take the chew. He ran from me, I got him by the collar and went to get the rest from his mouth, and then he growled and snapped at me! I am so upset he did this to me. I really let him know what a bad boy he was and immediately put him in time out. (he is in there as we speak crying) I just am not sure how to continue after this. Do I recreate this episode with the chew and take it from him again? He is learing that I do not let him keep it all the time, or when unsupervised, so he was mad I took it. Is some of this agression normal? I mean, he is a growing dog, but I am the leader, and he is to NEVER snap at me or anyone.:confused:
 

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u mad?
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So, do I recreate the same thing to make sure he knows I do not allow that? Like practice?? LOL
Unless you have a plan that would be potentially dangerous and setting him up for failure. Give me a second and I"ll find you some articles.



Seems they go through stages like this for a while. Mine have any ways & they all ended up being love bugs.
I disagree. My boy is about 19 months old now. He gets some VERY high value treats and bones and I've always been able to approach him and take them away without any sign of aggression/guarding behavior.
 

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u mad?
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...He ran from me, I got him by the collar and went to get the rest from his mouth, and then he growled and snapped at me! I am so upset he did this to me. I really let him know what a bad boy he was and immediately put him in time out....
Just curious - how did you go about doing this?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I raised my voice louder than he is use to, and physically made him go to his time out. I told him more than once right after the incident that he was a bad bad boy. I think he felt badly about it once in time out. He is out now, helping me type...lol...
 

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u mad?
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Here are some Resource Guarding articles...
(some I knew about before-hand, some I found on Google and skimmed quickly)
Resource Guarding? Biting? Dog-dog Agression? No Sweat. Boulder Dog
Working Through Resource Guarding
http://www.4pawsu.com/Donaldson.pdf
The Dog Trainer : Resource Guarding ? What It Is, How to Prevent It :: Quick and Dirty Tips
Resource Guarding, causes, prevention and modification
Resource Guarding Ahimsa Dog Blog
Nothing in Life is Free (NILF)

Make sure to start with something lower value and work your way up to a higher-value treat. For example, if my dog showed this behavior I'd start training him with kibble, then move up to some sort of treat, then a treat that he likes more than the previous, etc, etc, until the final parts of the training where you use something really high value (something he likes a lot).
 

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So, do I recreate the same thing to make sure he knows I do not allow that? Like practice?? LOL
Absolutely Yes - BUT only if you are confident, calm and not afraid...and stern.
40 years ago, I worked with a lab breeder, he told me it was normal for the odd pup.
- it would show who the new boss was / usually, at 7 months old (start of sexual maturity)
Just have to be very firm, and if the dog was most loving before and well socialized, the owner needs to take charge, now.
(but internet advise, can turn ugly...just saying / maybe do proofing with a friend, by your side to start)

Starting from 8 week old puppy:
I often pet them (stroke their back) when they eat, and frequently take a bone away and give it back a few seconds later.
- hand fed her kibble on the living room floor, several times, when our Amy was little
My girl is 11.5 years old, and still I stroke her back if I walk past her when she is eating.
She has been conditioned to accept, "whats hers is also mine"...she likes the attention.

My nephew was in grade 1 and their Sheltie pup snipped at the young boys hand, just giving the dog a biscuit treat.
Without hesitation or fear and without even thinking, the 6 year old child rambed his hand right down the dogs mouth and fetched the biscuit out...because his dog showed bad manners.
- first and last time, this dog was ever food aggressive / some like to test the waters, see what they can get away with
Stop the bad dog manners now, before it gets much worse / you don't have a problem dog yet...and its just not breed specific.
 

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Alpha SheepDog
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He is trying to be a bratty doberteen, especially if it is the first incident and it has to be nipped in the butt asap, or it goes beyond, just bones. Possibly testing the water.
I learned enuf about resource guarding from my Grandmothers Pekingnese when I was a very small kid. He learned pretty quick once I took over feeding him.
Since then every dog, I ever had, I handled their food and bones. but some will still try, guarding what they perceive is theirs.
My first Dobe Kaiser, hit about 6 monthish and asked him to let me see the bone and he lifted his lip, that was enuf for me. I hit the roof verbally and told him, to the crate, which he did rather quickly. He got a short time out, and when i let him back out, I guided him to the living room, where I started picking up his toys, knucklebone, and chew bone, while I lectured him to the fact, that these are all mine. We then went for a nice Forced March (Quick pace walk). The next morning, he was hand fed half his food and the remaining he ate, with my hand in the bowl, telling him, this is a better piece. Same ritual at supper time. Next day, he got the offending chew bone back, and he made a choice when I asked him again, to let me see the bone. Slowly day by day, he got stuff back.
Now, when he hit around 9 months, I just happened to be in the laundry when he was eating and one of my cats was just lurking, Kaiser decided to growl at him. Well the Lord Thundering voice/roar came rolling all about him, and I didnt have to say the word, crate as he was already in it by the time I ended my uproar. His food, was put up on a ledge, as he could see it, and he got my lecture again, and didnt eat till the following day, with my one cat right beside him,. Now people will diasgree the dog doesnt have a clue, but I will argue it, when you have an intelligent dog, they figure out pretty quick who cares for them and feeds them. NOw, a person might have a dog, that isnt as swift or your message was not strong enuf and your results might differ.
 

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Second the recommendation for Jean Donaldson's book, "Mine! A Practical Guide to Resource Guarding in Dogs." It's cheap, and is a step-by-step guide to how to work on this issue.
 

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Anytime you get a pup one of the first things you need to teach them is "Drop It" & "Leave IT" I the way I teach it is when I give them something and I want to get it back I trade up with a higher value treat. Most times they get it back but sometimes not so they learn the mom /or dad can take anything away at any time. I have retrieved chicken bones out on walks with a quick "Leave It" kept my Dachshund from picking up a very dead frog had Buddy drop two dead squirrels at different times so hubby could get them to throw away. These are to two most important commands you can train your to do the only one more important is come.Since your pup is older I would talk to a trainer on how to teach this to a older pup you do not want to get bit. Good Luck
 

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joie de vivre
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Has he been taught "drop it"? Or do you take things by just...well, taking things from him?
 

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I dont think thats normal. My boy has never done anything like that.. he definitively knows better... lol. I would re-create the situation and end it fast. He needs to know he is not alpha.
 

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you do realize your DOG is not a human?

Time out; dogs don't know what that is; and he's not MAD at you; dogs don't have these emotions.

Please stop treating dogs like people; they are animals...

so if you're doing that you're definitely not the leader.

Get him into obedience classes; the trainer can help you with your issue and you will have an expert so you don't mess it up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I do not treat him like a person. Give me a little credit. He is in obediance classes. I have a wonderful trainer that will go over with me what I should do this weekend. So far, he has not done this again. I will be sure to let him know it is not acceptable behavior.
 

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I think most "kids" like to challenge their "parents" at a certain time in their growing, I know I sure did more than most lol. While I wouldn't call it unusual at all for a dog to test his owners, it's not something I would just let be. I would just continue working on daily training, and start incorporating drop it commands.

In initial training, I used toys as rewards because Dakota is pretty drivey. So a tug rope or bite wedge is higher value than a food type reward. We have pretty specific rules for some of the "rougher" games, and if one of the rules weren't followed, I simply put the toy away and that was that. If you are using a high enough value reward, your dog will understand that bad behavior makes the toy go away, and the bad behavior will stop. Good behavior means the game keeps going. I expect a command to be followed at ALL times, regardless. If we are in the middle of the most intense bite work, and she is 100% focused, I expect a near immediate drop when I give the command. If I don't get a near immediate response (which never, ever happens anymore) the toy goes away.

It's common for dobes to test the limits, similar to a young kid when their parents tell them to turn off the tv, or video games, or get off the computer, etc. But it will be severely minimized by a good training routine.
 

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I agree with others who said to teach the "drop it" or "leave it" command. I taught my girl Micah the Leave it command. It worked really well for getting things away from her or even things like walking by another dog who was barking at her, a quick "leave it" and she would turn her head to the front and walk on by!
 

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He is trying to be a bratty doberteen, especially if it is the first incident and it has to be nipped in the butt asap, or it goes beyond, just bones. Possibly testing the water.
I learned enuf about resource guarding from my Grandmothers Pekingnese when I was a very small kid. He learned pretty quick once I took over feeding him.
Since then every dog, I ever had, I handled their food and bones. but some will still try, guarding what they perceive is theirs.
My first Dobe Kaiser, hit about 6 monthish and asked him to let me see the bone and he lifted his lip, that was enuf for me. I hit the roof verbally and told him, to the crate, which he did rather quickly. He got a short time out, and when i let him back out, I guided him to the living room, where I started picking up his toys, knucklebone, and chew bone, while I lectured him to the fact, that these are all mine. We then went for a nice Forced March (Quick pace walk). The next morning, he was hand fed half his food and the remaining he ate, with my hand in the bowl, telling him, this is a better piece. Same ritual at supper time. Next day, he got the offending chew bone back, and he made a choice when I asked him again, to let me see the bone. Slowly day by day, he got stuff back.
Now, when he hit around 9 months, I just happened to be in the laundry when he was eating and one of my cats was just lurking, Kaiser decided to growl at him. Well the Lord Thundering voice/roar came rolling all about him, and I didnt have to say the word, crate as he was already in it by the time I ended my uproar. His food, was put up on a ledge, as he could see it, and he got my lecture again, and didnt eat till the following day, with my one cat right beside him,. Now people will diasgree the dog doesnt have a clue, but I will argue it, when you have an intelligent dog, they figure out pretty quick who cares for them and feeds them. NOw, a person might have a dog, that isnt as swift or your message was not strong enuf and your results might differ.
Your answer is here.
I would also practice this:
Dog Training - Distance Sits In Action - YouTube

seems un related but this is key.

Also letting him know it was unacceptable is great nut only while they are doing it or 1.3 seconds later.
Better to go down a positive route for 'soft mouth training'
 
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