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Discussion Starter #1
I've found a Doberman puppy for adoption and I'm super excited to possibly adopt her. She's still 8 weeks old but she's the cutest puppy I've ever seen. Besides that, we live in an apartment and no one leaves the house. There's always one person in the house, all the time, and we will all be committed to making her happy. How do you think we can accommodate this beautiful pup? I just want to make sure we give her all the space and comfort we can and keep her happy !!!

So basically just asking what are some things I have to keep in mind before I get her pertaining to my conditions?
Thank you so much!! :):)
 

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Is this puppy from a rescue? Look into what they require, first. Many rescues require fencing.
 

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She means a fenced in yard. They make life a whole lot easier, especially when you are are out at 3:00 AM pottying a puppy.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
She means a fenced in yard. They make life a whole lot easier, especially when you are are out at 3:00 AM pottying a puppy.
We don't have a yard but I can take her outside to the gardens, and take her on walks for a while everyday!
 

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Wow, good for you that the rescue is considering adopting to you without a fenced in yard. Most reputable rescues won’t adopt to people without a fenced yard. Good luck!
 

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Wow, good for you that the rescue is considering adopting to you without a fenced in yard. Most reputable rescues won’t adopt to people without a fenced yard. Good luck!
I haven't asked them about that yet but I did hear that Dobermans should be fine inside if they get enough exercise. Is that true?
 

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When I approached Doberman rescues I was disqualified for not having a yard. The application they give you should ask you all their qualifying questions, if it is a reputable rescue. Exercise for a puppy requires lots of gentle physical play (no jumping) and lots of mental exercising (sniff walks, brain games). The experts on this forum will be able to give you additional information.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
When I approached Doberman rescues I was disqualified for not having a yard. The application they give you should ask you all their qualifying questions, if it is a reputable rescue. Exercise for a puppy requires lots of gentle physical play (no jumping) and lots of mental exercising (sniff walks, brain games). The experts on this forum will be able to give you additional information.
I checked out the questionnaire and yes, they ask everything about my house and the yard, etc. It seems reputable, they ask if you have a vet, a yard, if any dogs died in the past 12 months, etc. But I'm still wondering if I should adopt that Doberman puppy or not. I can certainly take her out for 1-2 hours everyday, play with her whenever I have time, feed her, train her to pee and poo outside only, and do whatever she needs to be happy. I just don't know if the space in my apartment (which is 1 bedroom, 1 living room, kitchen and a very small patio) will be enough for her. If it is fine I don't want to be disqualified for not having a yard.
 

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I checked out the questionnaire and yes, they ask everything about my house and the yard, etc. It seems reputable, they ask if you have a vet, a yard, if any dogs died in the past 12 months, etc. But I'm still wondering if I should adopt that Doberman puppy or not. I can certainly take her out for 1-2 hours everyday, play with her whenever I have time, feed her, train her to pee and poo outside only, and do whatever she needs to be happy. I just don't know if the space in my apartment (which is 1 bedroom, 1 living room, kitchen and a very small patio) will be enough for her. If it is fine I don't want to be disqualified for not having a yard.
Personally, I think it is less about space and more about time, LOTS OF TIME.

I will tell you that 6 months into my Doberman journey, they are a lot of work. My boy is 8 months and the most challenging dog I have ever had. I am likely way older than you and have had dogs my whole life including 25 years of Boxers 3 of whom I have gotten to obedience titles.

My pup is wicked smart, very energetic and VERY vocal. I own a 950sq ft condominium on the 6th floor of an historic building in Washington, DC and we make it work BUT, I spend a large part of each and every day devoted to exercising Beau with sniff walks, obedience sessions at the churchyard across the street, and doggie brain games.

I am fortunate enough to work from home (have done well before COVID) and have a ton of freedom to dash out several times a day for his exercise needs. I am also incredibly committed to his training and have spent a ton of money and a HUGE amount of time to set his foundations and we still struggle. He will finally crate without screaming, after 6 months of daily crate sessions but still yodels demonically when he sees another dog (we are working on that).

Right now, I don’t have much time to myself. We walk an hour at 6am each morning, then go out again after breakfast at 8 for a quick pee. Weekdays, I set him up with a few brain games to occupy him when I am working. We go back out at 10:30 for a 10 minute walk, more work, then 1pm we go for a 45-minute walk (sniffs at his pace for the first half, obedience walking on the way home). Then he crates for an hour or 2 while I do something outside my condo (even if I just take my laptop to the lobby and work), then out for a quick pee around 4. Then, I wrap up my work day and at 6 we do some official training inside or at the church, weather depending. We work on long sits and downs, do recall on a long line, play place games and more. Then Beau gets dinner. We go out for about 45 minutes around 8, then one last quick trip around 11pm. Somehow in there I manage to drink lots of coffee, eat, work, do laundry, schedule the maids, conduct condo Board business, and keep my sanity (barely).

He is totally worth it but I am looking forward to the day when we can both just chill the eff out. 😁

This is how I do things. It is not the only way and there may be those who think that I am excessive but I firmly believe that the work I am putting in will create a wonderful adult dog who can accompany me almost everywhere. At least that is the goal. Hope that helps!
 

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I lived in an apartment when I got my first dobe (some 40 years ago). So that was where he grew up and spent the first 2 years of his life. We both worked, but our schedules overlapped a bit so he was alone for about 6 hours--he spent his time when we were gone in a barricaded-off puppy-proofed kitchen.

We walked him off leash in open fields just outside our apartment (mostly in an old overgrown tree farm/plant nursery) for an hour or so Every. Single. Day. Rain. Snow or Shine. In the winter the days were short; it was dark and cold--but we put in our hour walk in spite of that. We people probably only strolled around on a sort of a loop trail for about a mile or so, but he was off leash, so he could wander and run back and forth for the entire hour. And we were moving, so he didn't just sack out the way dogs do in a backyard. Time spent alone in a backyard does not qualify as exercise for any dog--they usually just do a sniff about and then find a comfortable place to snooze (or they bark non-stop, but that is another issue.)

We also took him to obedience classes once, sometimes twice, a week and spent time training him. We were quite active--on weekends we took him camping, on hikes and cross country skiing in the winter. He was our baby (we had no kids at the time) so he went everywhere with us. That worked. Any less would not have.

I guess what I would ask is whether you have the kind of lifestyle that already involves that kind of activity? It's easy to promise the moon in the thrill of adding a new puppy to your family, but people being what they are, your enthusiasm may wear off quickly. If you would have to make a major change to your lifestyle to accommodate a puppy, it might be hard for you to keep it up day after day, year after year...
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I'm just reading your stories and the amount of dedication and love you guys have for your pups is astounding. It inspires me to do the same for any dog I get too!

I'm still a really young person, and I have schoolwork, homework,etc. But I believe a puppy can make a really nice positive change in my life, and I'm willing to train it as much as I can to chill out, just like MMcCown said. I would never get tired of a living thing, they're wonderful animals and I'm ready to accommodate them.

Here is my schedule!!

Wake up at around 7
School starts at 7:35
2 hours of lunch break starting at 12:05
Back to school till 2:30
I have 2-3 max hours of breaktime. During this time is when I plan to exercise and play with the puppy rather than going on my phone or laptop :D
I eat dinner at 8 pm
Homework usually takes about 5 hours everyday. I really have to start organizing better too if I do get a dog :)
I sleep at about 11 to 12

What do you guys think? I can fit in time and I will train my puppy the best I can. Thanks a lot for your help!!
 

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I don’t want to tell you it can’t be done but looking at your schedule it would be very challenging for you to give the pup what it needs AND ensure you are keeping up with your studies. In addition to time, there is the money to consider. These guys grow fast so you need to factor in regular vet care [edited to add: what about NON-regular vet care? even with experienced owners things go wrong in puppyhood], lots of food, supplies, training, dog walker if you can‘t get home to take him out.

It is a huge endeavor and I admire you for asking the question. It shows a level of self-awareness that is rare in people of all ages. Just my 2 cents - you are better off waiting until you have more time.

On paper, it may look like you have time but puppies, especially 8 weeks old (rare in rescue) need to go out constantly at the beginning, After they wake-up, after they eat/drink, after they play, and so on.

If you are dead set on it, do everything you can to be ready for a time suck, monetary drain, and emotional roller coaster. Doberman’s are not an easy breed. They are expensive to feed and care for and that is before any of their health issues crop up. They demand human interaction and need as much of you as you can give and then, need more.

Good luck with whatever you decide.
 

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Things to consider:
Do you have a social life? How much of that free time would you want to spend visiting friends, going on dates or outings, things of that sort where you would not be bringing a dog along? Even time spent catching up with folks online or the phone is time away from the puppy.

What will your work life be like when you get to that point--how soon will that be?

Another big thing to consider--are you planning on living where you are for an extended period of time? Will you still need to be renting when you finally move out? It can be very hard to find a rental place that will accept dobermans or even just an ordinary large dog (dobermans have a bad reputation among many landlords and large rental developments have rules about pet ownership that even an individual welcoming landlord may not be able to bend.). It is easier to find a rental house--but of course that costs more.

Speaking of money, how are you doing with your savings? Dogs, of course, have to be fed; you'll want to spend some money on toys and paraphernalia (collars, leashes, dog dishes, a crate...)--it adds up. But unfortunately dobermans as a breed are not very healthy. You are likely to have substantial vet bills--perhaps not so much with a young dog, though of course they need their shots and checkups--and once a dog hits 2 or 3, he will need more specialized testing as part of his annual checkup (a yearly holter and sonogram plus the vet evaluation to go along with it may run you a big chunk of cash 6-700 dollars or more), but as dobes age, your medical expenses may go up substantially. They are prone to a number of problems which are expensive to diagnose and expensive to treat
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hmm, so since the question of my social life came up, I usually call my friends on the phone or text them. I don't do this often too :eek:

Concerning my studies, I spend a LOT of my study time actually getting distracted and I wind up on youtube or whatever :p This again pertains to my time management, I think getting a dog will help me schedule that much, much better.

I'm actually going to designate the dog as an ESA dog. My therapist suggested for me to do so, since they can help me feel much better, especially with my restlessness and anxiety, depression, etc. I think having a friend around who will remind you to schedule yourself is a huge help in getting my life back on track :) And ESA animals cannot be denied from an apartment, even if it's a no-pet policy since they are beneficial to the owner.

And as for the financial issue, my parents are okay with spending money for food, crates, beds, toys, e.t.c. They are just as concerned as I am to provide the dog with a healthy life, which explains my research! We also would def buy supplements and whatever the dog needs to be healthy. I know that senior dogs will show health conditions over time as they age and my family will most likely save for it.

I actually most likely will prefer the puppy at all times rather than games or friends. I've always had a fascination for puppies and I think time away from the screen for me is time towards the puppy! I'm prepared to make as much time as I can for it...

And someone is home all the time. One of us will be available to walk the dog at all times or look over it.

Do you guys think I should save up a large sum of money? I already gave up a ton of stuff that can go towards a puppy and I don't ask for things anymore at all. How much do you guys spend for stuff every month? And how often do I have to go to the vet for a Doberman and how much does it cost every year at the vet's?

Again thanks a ton for the help!! I couldn't convince my parents without your help :)
 

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This is an expensive breed to own. Plain and simple. Look into comprehensive pet insurance - chances are you'll need it.

Can you handle a surprise emergency vet bill? Those can start at $2k and go up from there. Can you handle annual echocardiograms and holters once pup hits the age of 2? They aren't cheap, either, and they involve a veterinary cardiologist. Look into training costs for your area, too - if anyone's holding group training right now, that is.

A baseline typical vet visit can be around $60. That's just for the vet to look at your dog. That doesn't include vaccinations. Do you have a vet in mind? Call them and ask what things cost at their clinic.

Expect to be up at least once in the middle of the night to take the puppy out. Expect to go outside every half hour at first, to get puppy pottied. Yes, every half hour, plus immediately before and after every meal, every training session, every nap, every time puppy's put in the crate. Expect to feed 3x daily until around 6 months of age. Expect to have that puppy either crated or tethered to you at all times for the first few months, at least.

Have you cleared this with your leasing office? Dobermans are often a banned breed.

What's your experience with dog ownership? What's your training plan? What's your goal for this puppy? This isn't a companion breed - this is a working breed, and it isn't for everyone.

What happens if you have to move back in with your parents? Are they 100% on board with bringing a large dog into their home?
 

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I've looked into pet insurance like you said and seems like it is about 30-40 dollars depending on the plan, which is affordable for my family.

The medical bills are much more expensive in my state than yours, which is something that I will take into consideration. It's definitely something that's important... Seems like Dobermans need more medical maintenance than the average dog.

With the looking after and taking care of the puppy, that's something that I do definitely do. I've looked it up before and asked around as well, and puppies are much more care than they seem at first! That's why I'm asking now, since I'm ready, and since my summer break is coming up soon. I want to decide before June so I can properly take care of a puppy then. I'm just conflicted about the breed when I adopt. : )

The leasing office cannot deny a dog because of it's size, age, breed, etc. if it's a ESA. This means that I can keep a Doberman without them denying it.

Now that you mention Dobermans aren't companion breeds I don't think they may be a great fit for me. I haven't had dogs in the past personally (my parents did though). My training plan is to research as much as I can about this breed and how people train them, and find a training group like you said to go to every week or two weeks.

My parents currently are with me and I've talked to them about possibly adopting a Doberman. They're okay with any breed as long as it can be healthy and happy in our house with the amount of care we can give it!

Thanks a lot for the insight!! Seems like it was the right decision for me to come into these forums.. you guys are obviously well educated : D I will reconsider getting a Doberman. I'm looking for a dog I can play with and have fun with, but also relax a lot, so maybe a corgi.

If you guys know any reputable breeders or any safe websites to look for corgi breeders it would be much appreciated if you sent me it. I checked AKC & PWCCA, found a bunch and sent emails, but none have any puppies (one is expecting soon!)
 

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I will!! Thanks for letting me know!
Aren't corgis much easier to keep than Dobermans? I assume you mean an easier breed than Dobermans not Corgis?
If you are thinking about one of the herding breeds you might want to do a fairly extensive search for Corgi health. One of the times I was thinking about trying another breed than a Doberman and I looked for insight from a friend who had corgi's, bred and showed them for years and practically the first thing she said was that corgi's had a built in problem as does any breed who are long backed and short legged. And while she said corgi's, while a lot of fun were a more fragile breed in her opinion and suggested I check out Australian Shepherd breeders. Ultimately I did and got an Aussie from foundation stock when the AKC moved Aussie out of Miscellaneous and into Herding group.

My friend was right. The Aussie was a fun breed, bright and trainable and worked well with the Dobermans that I went back to--he was sturdy as an old boot. Got along with the Dobes, never scared anyone and never make finding a place to rent a problem (well, except for the general problem of no dogs allowed) and I had him for 13 years.

Good luck with your search though...

dobebug
 
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