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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
is age ever a factor in determining whether or not a family/person is the right forever home for your pups?

i am 21 years old, but i will not be looking for a dobey pup for 2-4 years once my partner and i have the financial ability to live in a small family plus dog sized home.

i am concerned however that i may not seem like the perfect person for a pup simply due to my age, am i right in thinking this or is this just an unfounded worry of mine?

i appreciate you reading my post and your honesty :)

-TJ
 

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Absolutely age plays a factor. I was 23 when I got my dobe and unfortuately people "our age" are in the minority for really caing for their pets "til death do they part". Out lives are truely just beginning and often times you hear of us moving across the country and then what happens to the dog? Most people will just give the dog away. People our age often work LONG hours and our dog is the one who suffers or is given away because " we don't have enough time and it isn't fair to our dog" you know, those kind of ads. So many times people "our age" go into pet ownership with the best of intentions but jist aren't ready for the responsibility. I know the rescue I volunteer with, run by a girl a year younger than me, started when she was 19, will 9 times out of 10 NOT adopt out to young people because the dog ALWAYS ends up being given back or given away or you hear through the grapevine they are sick of the dog and are trying to get rid of it. As well, we often start getting married/ having kids then the dog has to go.
So it can be an uphill battle for sure! I guess you have to get to know the breeder, so that they can get a feel for you, prve that you are capable of following through. Maybe volunteer to foster with a local rescue. Personally, I knew the person I got Saph from, she brought her dobes to the vet I worked at and we just started chatting, then I saw her in town a couple times and we started chatting about dogs. When I was ready to move out on my own, I went to her thinking since she showed her dog she may know of a dog looking for a home. I literally went up to her while she was at work and said "I'm looking for a scarey looking dog" she said do you want Saphire, I said sure LOL- can you imagine if I went to a complete stranger who bred and said I was looking for a scarey looking dog, I would have been canned on the spot! BUT she knew me, knew I could and more importantly WOULD look after her beloved dog for her LIFE. I havent proved her wrong yet. There are a few people around our age who got dogs from reputable breeders and I know they had to prove themselves to their breeder.
 

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Absolutely age plays a factor. I was 23 when I got my dobe and unfortuately people "our age" are in the minority for really caing for their pets "til death do they part". Out lives are truely just beginning and often times you hear of us moving across the country and then what happens to the dog? Most people will just give the dog away. People our age often work LONG hours and our dog is the one who suffers or is given away because " we don't have enough time and it isn't fair to our dog" you know, those kind of ads. So many times people "our age" go into pet ownership with the best of intentions but jist aren't ready for the responsibility. I know the rescue I volunteer with, run by a girl a year younger than me, started when she was 19, will 9 times out of 10 NOT adopt out to young people because the dog ALWAYS ends up being given back or given away or you hear through the grapevine they are sick of the dog and are trying to get rid of it. As well, we often start getting married/ having kids then the dog has to go.
So it can be an uphill battle for sure! I guess you have to get to know the breeder, so that they can get a feel for you, prve that you are capable of following through. Maybe volunteer to foster with a local rescue. Personally, I knew the person I got Saph from, she brought her dobes to the vet I worked at and we just started chatting, then I saw her in town a couple times and we started chatting about dogs. When I was ready to move out on my own, I went to her thinking since she showed her dog she may know of a dog looking for a home. I literally went up to her while she was at work and said "I'm looking for a scarey looking dog" she said do you want Saphire, I said sure LOL- can you imagine if I went to a complete stranger who bred and said I was looking for a scarey looking dog, I would have been canned on the spot! BUT she knew me, knew I could and more importantly WOULD look after her beloved dog for her LIFE. I havent proved her wrong yet. There are a few people around our age who got dogs from reputable breeders and I know they had to prove themselves to their breeder.
this exactly!
there are a few of us here on the forum that are younger and have dogs, i much like thea2003 work for my girls breeder and she knew i was competent committed and had the resources, other had to prove they were truly committed and financially and emotionally prepared to take on the commitment for the next 10+ years.
If you can prove it, with references and etc...it will be hard but possible imo
 

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To answer your question shortly, yes.

However, I personally have not had the issue. I've recently begun talking to other breeders, and although I am young, I already show a commitment to the breed, and training. I have excellent references from trainers and veterinarians, and I am dedicated to my dog. Being able to say I have titles on my dog and that I train with a professional twice a week (confirmed via phone), I have not had issues with working breeders.

If I had 0 dog experience and no one to back up my commitment and training, I am sure I would have more people hesitant to talk to me regarding a puppy.

Basically what they said above is true. If you can prove yourself to the breeder (not just saying well 'this is what I'm going do', but this is what I did do) you should not have too hard of a problem. It depends on what you are looking for as well. A show breeder is not going to give their best show potential puppy to a complete beginner, and a working breeder is not going to give their highest drive dog to a person who has no experience with high drive dogs and training.

Just as an aside, the way you present yourself to the breeder can pretty much tell them right off the bat as to if you are the typical 'irresponsible kid'. If contacting via email, I would definitely be professional and make sure my grammar isn't that of a middle school-er. Many breeders are tentative to talk to a young person such as yourself because you say you are not going to get a dog for maybe 2-4 years and you have no idea where you will be at that time in your life. At this age, people get married, people break up, people have babies, etc, and throwing a dog into the mix often complicates things. I completely understand why a breeder would only want to give a puppy to somehow who is stable both financially and otherwise. I can say all day long that I'm gonna live here, be doing this, working here, be with this person, etc, but this is all a bunch of maybes.

And who knows, after 2-4 years you may not even want a doberman, none the less want a doberman from the breeder that took so much time to get to know you.
 

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u mad?
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I got my boy when I was 21, however I do agree that age is a factor.
I went out of my way to make sure that Dreizehn's breeder knew that I was prepared to care for the puppy I got throughout his life, that I had done TONS of research on the breed and at least had an idea about what I was getting myself into, and that regardless of my age I would be a phenomenal owner. Just be open and honest to the breeders you do/are talking to.

Edit: I will say that it helped my case, I'm sure, that I had been working in doggy daycare/vet facilities for 5ish years prior.
 

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I'm also about your age, and I'm preparing to welcome a dog into my home in the next few years. It is absolutely very difficult to be taken as seriously as someone who is older. But I've been attending shows seriously for about two years now, and spent about five months working for some of the best handlers in the country. While I was doing that, I learned a lot and met some great breeders and handlers. I also got to see a lot of different lines and learn things about them that I wouldn't have known otherwise. I'm not working as a handler's assistant now, but I made a lot of important connections and I'm in a very different situation than I would have been if I had just been some young girl looking for a puppy in a few years.
 

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I had trouble getting replies from Dobe breeders when I mentioned my age.

I do have a dog now (not a dobe), and like the other under 25's on the forum, I don't think my timetable is much like non-dog owning people my age! I study and have two jobs, and spend between 2-10 hours a day training and exercising my dog.. and go home on my study breaks to let her out... there is no time for a social life or nice things outside of dog commitments haha. I do have an active dog social life though! Spend most weekends out at shows, just not with other 21 year olds!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thanks for the responses everyone,

i completely see what you all are saying, and i am definitely willing to prove to my breeder (rather whoever they may be in the future) that i am not your "typical irresponsible kid". although i am not really your typical 20-something anyway as i am a young mother and do not partake in typical 20-something socialization or behaviour either :p

i will also be volunteering with the humane society when i get some time in between schooling so maybe that will help my case as well!

thanks again
-TJ
 

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^^^^ all great advise.

This happened in a different time period, 35 years ago (but I am not a breeder):
We also got our first dobe at 21 y/o and didn't have 2 nickles to scrape together.
Breeder asked me where my wife and I would live, I said where moving into an apartment...dog approved.
Breeder said, what if there is a problem ??
I said, then we move...simple as that...dog will NEVER be given up !!
After we got our first dober pup, months later nearly got evicted from an apartment until I hired a lawyer, kept my dog at all costs and moved into a semi. (1/2 house) when the yearly lease was up.

So I phoned my 2nd breeder first (chat at length) and followed up with a unique e-mail...to support my claims:
- because I convinced the next breeder that we had a forever home, #1 we dedicate our life to our dog, have training experience and love them like children (and can prove it) - we went from junk mail inquiry status to being short listed ASAP / confirmed a FM puppy, from next available litter

I want to check out the breeder as much as they want to check me out...and we become very good friends, with our breeders.
This day in age, you have to "prove" youself, to the good breeders...they don't hand over their babies willy-nilly.
- relationships &/or resume (accomplishments), needs to be built
 

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While volunteering with the humane society is great...if it just entails exercising the dogs, on a walk...your not learning as much about dobe ownership (and may not be time well occupied, without getting taught)...while truly commendable.

Personally, learning OB with a mentor &/or taking a friends medium size dog to OB class...both on & off leash, could make you a leading candidate for dobe ownership.
Then you would have the skill set to train the pup, from Day1 and be in control, instead of having potential problems crop up & trying to figure out what is going wrong, after the fact...and being behind the 8-ball...looking for training classes.

A great internet resourse is:
Leerburg Dog Training | 16,000 pages of dog training information, 300 free dog training streaming videos, free eBooks, podcasts, by Ed Frawley and Michael Ellis
Try and get pre-experience also...and you will be in really good standing, and more than ready, at any age / good luck, and prove your commitment.
 

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I was 23 when I got my boy. I found things like owning a home, having a partially fenced yard, and growing up with animals all played very much in my favor. Being my first dog with working dogs in the pedigree he was a challenge, but I never once thought of giving up on my boy.
 

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I had trouble getting replies from Dobe breeders when I mentioned my age.

I do have a dog now (not a dobe), and like the other under 25's on the forum, I don't think my timetable is much like non-dog owning people my age! I study and have two jobs, and spend between 2-10 hours a day training and exercising my dog.. and go home on my study breaks to let her out... there is no time for a social life or nice things outside of dog commitments haha. I do have an active dog social life though! Spend most weekends out at shows, just not with other 21 year olds!
My social life is like this too! :roflmao: For me it feels like every appointment is a doggy appointment. Ringcraft on Monday evening. Hydrotherapy on Tuesday afternoon. Training Wednesday Morning. Hydrotherapy Thursday afternoon. Show Saturday and Sunday! Not to mention all the time spent walking or meeting up with people to walk. I have my 'non doggy friends' too, but they dont get a lot of scheduled time.

I think if I were a breeder age would be a concern for me, but as other people have already said, you can do your best to prove that you are really interested in the breed and being a responsible pet owner. I would be interested to see what the prospective owner was looking to do with the dog (ie agility, obedience, working sports, showing ect) and working at a shelter would be a bonus for me too.

My age was never asked when I was looking to buy a dog; I just told the breeder about my current dog (I have a rescue I got when I was 17) and about how much I loved the breed (named its character) about how we attend lots of events currently (horse events, car events, country fairs ect) about how we'd be looking to do obedience (later turned into showing!) and about my working conditions ect to prove I was capable of providing enough time for the dog.

Young people can do some really great things, I wouldn’t think anyone would write someone off just because they're young if theyre an otherwise perfect owner :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
While volunteering with the humane society is great...if it just entails exercising the dogs, on a walk...your not learning as much about dobe ownership (and may not be time well occupied, without getting taught)...while truly commendable.

Personally, learning OB with a mentor &/or taking a friends medium size dog to OB class...both on & off leash, could make you a leading candidate for dobe ownership.
Then you would have the skill set to train the pup, from Day1 and be in control, instead of having potential problems crop up & trying to figure out what is going wrong, after the fact...and being behind the 8-ball...looking for training classes.

A great internet resourse is:
Leerburg Dog Training | 16,000 pages of dog training information, 300 free dog training streaming videos, free eBooks, podcasts, by Ed Frawley and Michael Ellis
Try and get pre-experience also...and you will be in really good standing, and more than ready, at any age / good luck, and prove your commitment.

thank you so much, i wasn't expecting so much helpful information from you all. i wish there was a dobey rescue close to where i live as well as at the moment i am unable to drive, i have some experience with rottweilers and GSD's as i've owned medium-large breed dogs with my family since i can remember but i've only been able to meet dobes a handful of times. not enough for my liking!

thanks again, i will definitely look into all of this :)

-TJ
 

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On this question of age, it seems that this is just a little bit one-sided. Is there any time that a breeder would be turned off by a young, senior citizen?
 

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Sad I think oftentimes it's not until later in life that people get the time & resources to do well with being commited to dogs.
For those who've got it together young now, know you've a charmed life and cherish every moment.

I wish I'd had the wherewithal/resources to have pursued dogs in my youth, back when I could have run circles around them~8D
 

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On this question of age, it seems that this is just a little bit one-sided. Is there any time that a breeder would be turned off by a young, senior citizen?
yes the same things applies, the question of physical strength, possible health issues, death and so on are all a factor.

Just the same as they worry they'll get a dog back from a young person for being over the fleeting idea or growing up they worry they'll get a dog back because an owner has now come upon common old age health issues, passed away, or is overall unable to care for the dog the entirety of its life.

Proving you are still fit able and have a back up plan of sorts for the dogs care if you fall ill or pass on is very helpful. You do thankfully have experience in your basket :)
 

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I think it all depends on how much you are prepared to do, how active your lifestyle is. I also think that being that young your brain can be clouded with how active you think you are, and how prepared you really are. It is easy to overthink yourself. I say this because I too am 23. It took me awhile to make sure I was ready for the plunge. It has worked out in my favor. I always have tons of energy for my pups. It does help I have been pretty successful for my age. I have the nice 2 story house with a 5 foot privacy fence. I made sure all of that was in place before my babies came home. I see a lot of my friends who jump in to puppies way to fast burn themselves in the long run. Most people get bored easily and think a puppy will cure this fast. In all reality that boredom eventually subsides and before you know it you are always busy, and the puppy gets left aside. Things change extremly fast while we are young. You need to make sure this time you have available for your dog is not something temporary. A good breeder will be able to see the honesty better than you can yourself.
 
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Sad I think oftentimes it's not until later in life that people get the time & resources to do well with being commited to dogs.
For those who've got it together young now, know you've a charmed life and cherish every moment.

I wish I'd had the wherewithal/resources to have pursued dogs in my youth, back when I could have run circles around them~8D
Me too. But I have friends/clients that are in their 70's that are enjoying showing still. I got a late start because hubbie's and kid's priorities came first. Am really enjoying the comradarie (sp?) that dog people offer and of course all the knowledge.
 

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A good breeder will not sell someone littermates, especially a newbie.


I think it all depends on how much you are prepared to do, how active your lifestyle is. I also think that being that young your brain can be clouded with how active you think you are, and how prepared you really are. It is easy to overthink yourself. I say this because I too am 23. It took me awhile to make sure I was ready for the plunge. It has worked out in my favor. I always have tons of energy for my pups. It does help I have been pretty successful for my age. I have the nice 2 story house with a 5 foot privacy fence. I made sure all of that was in place before my babies came home. I see a lot of my friends who jump in to puppies way to fast burn themselves in the long run. Most people get bored easily and think a puppy will cure this fast. In all reality that boredom eventually subsides and before you know it you are always busy, and the puppy gets left aside. Things change extremly fast while we are young. You need to make sure this time you have available for your dog is not something temporary. A good breeder will be able to see the honesty better than you can yourself.
 
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