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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello DTers!

Just in case you guys don't visit the rescue forum ('bout high time you do, if you don't already!), I thought I'd introduce you all to Linn Benton Doberman Rescue's three most recent rescues: Abby the Albino Wondergirl, Sasha the Silly Dobergirl, and Rocco the Rambunctious Doberboy. Guest starring is Carne, Chili's puppy who we think is half Doberman and half Boxer. These guys had a wonderful Christmas, and it's always a happy house when there's happy dogs!

Abby, being regal (honestly, I think she was mad at me about the flash, but she's too polite to say so):



Abby sending lovey eyed wishes for a forever home:



Sasha being a sugar doll with her trademark like a lady crossed legs:



I swear, Sasha is pulling the "I'll keep my eyes closed if you just give me a tasty surprise!" pose here!:



Considering how skinny Sasha was when she first came in, I'm pretty proud of how beautiful she is now. Another month or two, and she should be ready for adoption.



And Rocco, who I swear, loses his usual happy go lucky expression the instant the lens cap comes off, and trades it for the tough guy look:



Rocco has been a challenging dog to work with, but he's absolutely a wonderful, loving and loyal friend. His adopter is getting a real gem in the rough, and honestly, they're both kinda rugged guys who seem gruff but have hearts of gold.



Rocco and Carne are going to miss each other when Rocco goes to his new home.



And that's it! Another happy holiday in a Doberman dominated household!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My dream someday is to have a few acres,fenced in take in as many rescues allowed........where they can be loved and cared for until they find their forever home.
Well, I can say from experience, it takes an awful lot of things going right to start a rescue and keep it rolling. Linn Benton Doberman Rescue turned 1 year old this December, and we've saved 20 dogs from death this year. I've also had to take five dogs on their final journey to the Rainbow Bridge, three of whom I put months of work into. Five dogs are currently being fostered (thank Heavens, only three are with me), and it will be months before some of them are adopted. It isn't thankless work though... because every dog that's adopted leaves room for one more to be saved, sometimes two, depending on how much work the adopted one needed.

The dogs themselves are all the reward in the world... watching them go from starving animal to flourishing friend. But there's heartbreak too... there's the dogs you just can't save, no matter how many months you spend trying to break through their aggression issues, or trying to cope with their failing health. Then there's the ones who just flat out die on you, all on their own. We had one that died in our bed, and let me tell you, consoling a seven year old who suddenly realizes the dog he's hugging is dead is no fun at all, especially when you're fighting your own tears.

Then there are the wonderful moments... like when an adopter calls you up to tell you how much the dog they brought into their homes and hearts means to them, and how they've decided they'll never buy a puppy again. There's the phone call from the guy whose adopted dog attacked the armed home invaders, giving him and his girlfriend time to call the police and lock themselves into the bathroom. Luckily, the dog survived without injury as well. There's the phone call from the woman whose husband was afraid of Dobermans until he met one of our ambassador dogs at a Doberman Day where we brought our dogs out for socializing at a local park. There's so much more to rescuing dogs than just having the space... I worked fostering dogs for years, but I never really understood just how much goes into actually running a rescue until this past year. I'm incredibly lucky to have a significant other who accepts that half my heart runs on four legs, and I'm fortunate to own 40 acres of remote rural land that allows me to keep both a sheep ranch and a Doberman sanctuary, but it is so much more than just fencing and food.

My best bit of advice to anyone who wants to start their own rescue is to take a few business classes at your local community college, and work for another rescue for at least three years. If you can take animal behavior classes at your local college, do. I worked for years with wildlife rehabilitation clinics, and all that experience with wolves has really paid off with the dogs. Better yet, serve on the board of a local non-profit rescue, and find out what it truly takes, at both an administrative and executive level, before you make that commitment and try to start your own. My other piece of advice is to find your board of directors BEFORE you start actually running, and always have a back up in mind. That little bit of fine print has caused me no end of grief. Overall though, we truly need more accountable rescues out there, not just for Dobermans but for all animals. My hat is off to all those who take the plunge and bootstrap themselves up into a new and raw organization. Everybody starts somewhere, and often it's not in the ideal.
 

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Well, I can say from experience, it takes an awful lot of things going right to start a rescue and keep it rolling. Linn Benton Doberman Rescue turned 1 year old this December, and we've saved 20 dogs from death this year. I've also had to take five dogs on their final journey to the Rainbow Bridge, three of whom I put months of work into. Five dogs are currently being fostered (thank Heavens, only three are with me), and it will be months before some of them are adopted. It isn't thankless work though... because every dog that's adopted leaves room for one more to be saved, sometimes two, depending on how much work the adopted one needed.

The dogs themselves are all the reward in the world... watching them go from starving animal to flourishing friend. But there's heartbreak too... there's the dogs you just can't save, no matter how many months you spend trying to break through their aggression issues, or trying to cope with their failing health. Then there's the ones who just flat out die on you, all on their own. We had one that died in our bed, and let me tell you, consoling a seven year old who suddenly realizes the dog he's hugging is dead is no fun at all, especially when you're fighting your own tears.

Then there are the wonderful moments... like when an adopter calls you up to tell you how much the dog they brought into their homes and hearts means to them, and how they've decided they'll never buy a puppy again. There's the phone call from the guy whose adopted dog attacked the armed home invaders, giving him and his girlfriend time to call the police and lock themselves into the bathroom. Luckily, the dog survived without injury as well. There's the phone call from the woman whose husband was afraid of Dobermans until he met one of our ambassador dogs at a Doberman Day where we brought our dogs out for socializing at a local park. There's so much more to rescuing dogs than just having the space... I worked fostering dogs for years, but I never really understood just how much goes into actually running a rescue until this past year. I'm incredibly lucky to have a significant other who accepts that half my heart runs on four legs, and I'm fortunate to own 40 acres of remote rural land that allows me to keep both a sheep ranch and a Doberman sanctuary, but it is so much more than just fencing and food.

My best bit of advice to anyone who wants to start their own rescue is to take a few business classes at your local community college, and work for another rescue for at least three years. If you can take animal behavior classes at your local college, do. I worked for years with wildlife rehabilitation clinics, and all that experience with wolves has really paid off with the dogs. Better yet, serve on the board of a local non-profit rescue, and find out what it truly takes, at both an administrative and executive level, before you make that commitment and try to start your own. My other piece of advice is to find your board of directors BEFORE you start actually running, and always have a back up in mind. That little bit of fine print has caused me no end of grief. Overall though, we truly need more accountable rescues out there, not just for Dobermans but for all animals. My hat is off to all those who take the plunge and bootstrap themselves up into a new and raw organization. Everybody starts somewhere, and often it's not in the ideal.
I appreciate your sound wisdom..this is down the road a few years. I'll be getting more advice from you again. Blessings on you and your family!!
 

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My mum once told me 'Angels dont have wings, they have big hearts'. I now understand what she meant.

I have volunteered a few times at a local shelter here in Spain, I have come home weeping buckets at the sights I have seen, but also tears of joy when a dog has been adopted and goes to a loving family. Alas here in Spain 'Dog Fights' are big business and we have had dogs stolen to fill the arenas so that sicko's can get their rocks off on seeing dogs rip each other or just another to pieces.
God how I would like to give a simple taste of such cruelty to the people who perpetrate it.
 

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You ARE terrific and the dogs look fabulous. Sasha's coat is SO shiny in the photos. Wow.
Thanks for the post on doing rescue work with a very short synopsis of what your year has been like. You are incredible.
It was after Chili came to you and had her pups and then died when you took that big step to go into rescue work formally, right? Chili is up there smiling down on you and yours, especially on Tyger and Carne. Danni (sp?) is also up there hanging out with Chili.
Best to you this holiday season. Hugs from Audrey and me.
 
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