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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
We have a 91/2 week old dobe female that we purchased at 8 weeks of age. She is extremely assertive-having been the "bully" in her litter (the biggest and most outgoing).

She is overly aggressive when playing with our 4 year old dobe/shepherd cross who is also female. The four year old is EXTREMELY patient and lets the puppy get away with biting/growling etc. until she's had enough.....then she walks away.

When the puppy get's too crazy, we say "no biting" or "no barking" and put her in another room for one minute of "time out".

Question is, if anyone else has the problem of a dominant young pup-any suggestions would be SO appreciated as we want to reign in the behaviours of incessant barking and biting asap.

Other than that, she's a very bright and lovable baby-already knows "sit" and "come".

Thank you SO much ahead of time! :)
 

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7 weeks is too young for a puppy to be separated from littermates and mother, it's this time that they learn bit inhibition and doggy body language. Typically puppies leave between 8-12 weeks old.

Dobe puppies are not called a land shark for no reason! Supervising every minute of interaction is a must, and separation of the two dogs will be frequent. Make sure your 4 year old has a place to escape.

This breed is also known for same sex aggression. While it's more common in males, females are also known to be intolerable to other females. While this trait doesn't really show up in puppyhood, it's good to know so you can be proactive if things get ugly as she matures.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
7 weeks is too young for a puppy to be separated from littermates and mother, it's this time that they learn bit inhibition and doggy body language. Typically puppies leave between 8-12 weeks old.

Dobe puppies are not called a land shark for no reason! Supervising every minute of interaction is a must, and separation of the two dogs will be frequent. Make sure your 4 year old has a place to escape.

This breed is also known for same sex aggression. While it's more common in males, females are also known to be intolerable to other females. While this trait doesn't really show up in puppyhood, it's good to know so you can be proactive if things get ugly as she matures.

Thank you so much for your response! Sadie was 8 weeks when we brought her home-typo----oops-my bad---still early in the morning! You have been very helpful-I love this site for the wonderful help and support everyone gives and our 4 year old does have an area to go when she's had enough-so it sounds like we are doing the right things so far! :)

"Land Sharks".....SO true! LOL!! :roflmao:
 

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We are going through a very similar scenario as well! Pippa is the runt of the litter, but acts in no ways like one. She is very confident with other dogs..maybe a little too much sometimes. We have a 5 year old chocolate lab, whom I thought would help us with teaching her bite inhibition. However, not alone is by dobe way more energetic than him, but she is taking every chance to nip/bite him. Remy the lab barks and growls but that doesnt stop her from attacking him. When she gets too rough, we separate them both. I think the best thing for now is try and redirect her attention, although it's hard because she would think I am the next prey lol. I freeze ice cubs with milk bones in them and give one whenever she gets too mouthy. Not only it redirects her attention, but the cold ice cube helps with numbing the pain. Wish you good luck with your new puppy:)
 

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You don't wait until things are really bad for your saint of a 4yr old dog or any other family pets. You correct at the first sign of inappropriate behavior. Be calm, firm and consistent.

You took a pup you knew was already being too pushy, so you had to know you'd have LOTS of correction work to do from minute one. It has nothing to do with same sex aggression.

You bought a baby bully who was never taught that she isn't the ruler of the world. Not fair to expect your existing pets to train her for you or tolerate lots of abuse. You have to train her as diligently as you'd work on any adult dog who displayed inappropriate behavior with your pup.
 

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Please re-think what you have said in your post "assertive " aggressive'' dominant" the last word should not be use at all with puppies or dogs. First the no biting & no barking she does not have a clue yet to what those words mean. The time outs will sink in but it will take along time yes Doberman puppies and Doberman's in general play really rough which is pretty normal for them. Dober Shark is one of their nick names along with Dober Goat. Give your adult dog some time out away from the puppy do not be surprised if your adult dog growls or air snaps at the pup that is usually how adults get the message across to puppies that will not back off. A good puppy kindergarten class would be great for your pup and you bonding time.Good Luck with your new baby.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Wonderful idea -ice cubes frozen with milk bones-thank you! It's been a few days now and the puppy is extremely bright-has picked up much in a short period of time. As soon as she starts getting carried away now, we say "time out" and if she doesn't stop, off she goes for a minute alone. She more often than not now, settles - she's quickly realizing it's better to play nice than to be isolated-even if for just a minute! I hope things are working out for your pup too! :) All the best and thank you again!
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
You don't wait until things are really bad for your saint of a 4yr old dog or any other family pets. You correct at the first sign of inappropriate behavior. Be calm, firm and consistent.

You took a pup you knew was already being too pushy, so you had to know you'd have LOTS of correction work to do from minute one. It has nothing to do with same sex aggression.

You bought a baby bully who was never taught that she isn't the ruler of the world. Not fair to expect your existing pets to train her for you or tolerate lots of abuse. You have to train her as diligently as you'd work on any adult dog who displayed inappropriate behavior with your pup.


It's been a few days now and our pup Sadie has made remarkable progress with us using "time out" in the bathroom. When she acts up, off she goes for a minute alone. This seems to work best as more often than not she is now choosing to settle down and play nicely rather than be isolated if only for a minute.

Oh we definitely knew we would have to put alot of work into training and am fortunate to be able to do it as, being a full time artist, I work from home and my schedule is flexible. We chose Sadie as she was so clearly intelligent and inquisitive-not shy at all:)!! I might add also, the two dogs have bonded incredibly well and neither one wants to go anywhere without the other.

It is alot of work but well worth it!
 

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Frozen Kongs work well. Soak kibble, mash it with plain yogurt, maybe a little mashed banana or whatever else you want to stuff into a Kong. Freeze. Give to the little landshark! I did that a lot when Griffin had to be on crate rest after an injury. I was desperate for ways to keep an active Dobe calm for a few weeks! He sprained his knee racing back to me on a recall, and did he ever hate having to take it easy.

Frozen Kong Recipes

Puppies are a lot of work! But yeah, it's good to seperate them and give pups a 'time out' of sorts to calm down. She's 9 weeks old, still learning boundaries. Sounds like you're on the right start for her.

((Also love the milk bone/ice cube suggestion, adding that to things to do when teething hits.))
 
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