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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 7 month old Doberman female. 2/3 of her meals are still hand fed through training. Since I got her at 10 weeks
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We are still banging the reps out on (sit,down,stay,recall and heel!) oh the power of the heel. The heel has become her ingrained response to me wanting her attention back. It’s awesome. I don’t want to be the typical asshat that just thinks their dog is protective. But she is reactive to people only at or near my home, truck, vacation home, or at work with me at my shop. Here are some scenarios.

1. At Lowe’s or Home Depot or pet smart. When I let her out of the truck if some one is near she gets reactive but comes right back to a sit heal no problem. As we make our way into the store she pays little attention to anyone. And in the store she will go into a down when asked even with people around. Even lay on her side. Now if some one comes within a few feet she might want to get up to a sit. And not be super comfortable. But tolerates them. When we are out in the parking lot near the truck I’m getting looks from people like “ you’re are gonna take that dog inside the store?”

2. When at are vacation house someone can be walking by the house she will react; low growl and would bark if I didn’t correct her. But I can be on a walk with her and pass the same person up the street and she doesn’t react at all. Notices the person yes but no reaction.

3. And as for my work and house it’s the same response to people as it is at my vacation house. If someone comes over she barks but stops when asked too and will recall to a heel. She will take 5-10 mins to tolerate them and will start to react anytime they move during that time.

So I’m just looking for some insight into what might be going on in her mind.
 

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Between the ages of 10-12 weeks old and 18mo-2years, dogs go in and out of fear stages. She is barking and growling at anything out of the ordinary, out of her comfort zone or near anything that she considers valuable. As you continue to show her what is ok to growl and bark at and what isn't she will learn and start to become better about it as she matures. The key is continual socialization to those things so that she can learn what is a threat and what isn't. Depending on what you want I personally wouldn't tolerate her behavior towards people I've invited into the house, business or vacation home.
 

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Agree on fear periods.

I would give her more distance to be comfortable, and just continue being neutral towards other people, continue reinforcing that people acting normally are neutral/positive.
 

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Hairy Dog, RIP Caesar, Katana, Kip, Capri
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I never want to squelch my dogs' instincts to alert with a bark or even a growl; I just want to be able to have them listen when I tell them it's OK to relax about a perceived threat.

If there is a knock on the door or the doorbell rings, or if someone is in my yard, I let my dogs bark. In fact, I encourage it by saying "Who's that?" as I acknowledge their barking. Then I say, "Oh, It's OK. Quiet." (Well, once I know it IS OK, that is) in a relaxed and welcoming way (NOT by yelling "SHUT UP!!!!") and expect them to hush and be accepting, or at least not confrontational, of anyone I invite in. If I have a dog that is a little bit edgy around guests, I enforce a "down and stay in place" command for the first few minutes of their visit until I can see that the dog has relaxed a bit.

I want my dog to alert when someone is encroaching on my space, but I also think that my acknowledging their alert and then telling them they can stand down helps them get the idea of when to accept a "stranger" into the house. Somehow purposely telling them that I've heard their warning and then showing them that I've considered the threat and decided it's OK seems to work for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the reply’s everybody. She is my first Doberman. I had a Queensland heeler for 15 years before her. And that dog was basically a golden retriever but also bomb proof. She went everywhere with me just like my current Doberman does. They seem very different so far but only time will tell how she’ll turn out.

To give a little more information. I’m fortunate enough to work for myself. So Stassi gets to go to work with me everyday. I have a large metal building that I work in that is on a 7 acre fenced yard. So she gets to have a job also. She spends most of the day in the front of the shop by the door watching the entrance. It’s probably 50 yards from the gate to the shop. She lets me know when someone is coming that’s for sure.

Along those lines between our training and getting to go to work everyday. She is pretty well worn out and content. Even being 7 months old once we get home she is hardly excited to go for a walk around the block. Most days she would be content to lay around the house the rest of the day. Just my observation for anyone wondering how to wear their pups out.
 

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I never want to squelch my dogs' instincts to alert with a bark or even a growl; I just want to be able to have them listen when I tell them it's OK to relax about a perceived threat.

If there is a knock on the door or the doorbell rings, or if someone is in my yard, I let my dogs bark. In fact, I encourage it by saying "Who's that?" as I acknowledge their barking. Then I say, "Oh, It's OK. Quiet." (Well, once I know it IS OK, that is) in a relaxed and welcoming way (NOT by yelling "SHUT UP!!!!") and expect them to hush and be accepting, or at least not confrontational, of anyone I invite in. If I have a dog that is a little bit edgy around guests, I enforce a "down and stay in place" command for the first few minutes of their visit until I can see that the dog has relaxed a bit.

I want my dog to alert when someone is encroaching on my space, but I also think that my acknowledging their alert and then telling them they can stand down helps them get the idea of when to accept a "stranger" into the house. Somehow purposely telling them that I've heard their warning and then showing them that I've considered the threat and decided it's OK seems to work for me.

Oh, are we not supposed to yell shut up!
Ba ha ha ha
 
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