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Hi,
I have a 2 month old Doberman male. I picked him up from the Breeder on September 5th. He has been biting and chewing at all his legs EXCESSIVELY since we brought him home. He has been to a Vet and he does have a double ear yeast infection with his cropped ears , I’m dissatisfied with his ear crop as well! Why is he biting his legs non stop? Also, can someone PLEASE recommend a good vet in NJ? I want to take him to someone new.
Thank you
 

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I think a second vet opinion would be your best bet. But just a couple of ideas:

1. An infection of some sort (mange?) or fleas—now, or in the recent past. Do you see ANY sign of inflammation anywhere on his body—redness, irritated or oozy skin, dandruff or flakiness?

2. Some kind of contamination he's picked up from his environment that is irritating his legs—weed killer, something like flea killer or pesticides, carpet cleaner, etc. Rinsing his legs in cool water or a diluted vinegar wash might help get rid of a surface irritant, but try to see a vet first before trying anything but plain water—whatever you do may make it more difficult for the vet to diagnose a problem. And if your pup is actually breaking the skin or you're seeing any kind of sores developing, whatever you use is likely to sting like crazy. A vet might be willing to talk to give you over the phone with advice about what to do between now and his appointment time, though obviously, they don't want to make a diagnosis over the phone, especially if they don't have a prior relationship with you.

3. Some form of obsessive behavior. Do you know how he was kept by the breeder (crated for long periods, no attention from people) that might have contributed to this kind of behavior as a self-soothing habit?

He seems a little young for true allergies or maybe even for actual obsessive behavior caused by skin irritation in the past (as differentiated from trying to just chew on his skin because it is bothering him right now or self-soothing "aloneness" behavior.)

I'd be curious to hear a new vet's opinion.
 
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