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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone. This is my first post, so I'm hoping I can get some help. I apologize in advance for the length of the post.

I have two 14 week old puppies, one is a male Boxer, and the other is a female Doberman. Our original plan was to get our puppies at the same time so they could grow up together (though I've been reading more and more about littermate syndrome...ugh).

We got the Boxer in March, and he's learned quite a bit and knows his own name. He's almost fully potty trained as well, which surprised me he learned this quickly. Sadly, the other puppy never made it to us (breeder turned out be a scammer), so we went with another breeder, but it took us a month.

We got our female Doberman this last Saturday. Her name is Karma. However, even at the breeder's house, Karma had a whining problem. The breeder told us she'd need quite a bit of training, but we felt we were up to the challenge, having just gone through it with our Boxer.

But the whining has continued and isn't improving at all. We are trying to get her leash trained for walks, but she's very stubborn. She does love to run around in our fenced-in back-yard, so I try to make sure she get's an hour of outside playtime in since she isn't doing well with walks yet.

I just don't know what might be causing the whining. The Boxer rarely whines (also rarely barks). I know Dobies are a vocal breed, but my aunt's Dobie (who is now 3 yrs old) didn't have this problem. We are looking into to hiring our local "dog whisperer" who has come highly recommended, but wanted to ask other Doberman owners for an opinion also.

Thanks!
 

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At what times is she whining? The best thing you can do is TOTALLY ignore her when she's whining. I'll even go as far as to put them in a crate in a separate room away from the pack until she quiets. Does she no what "no" means?? My 14 week old pup is super respectful of verbal correction and that's usually all it takes to shut her up!

As for leash walking, what have you tried? I will initially use bribing (treats) to get the puppy to move forward from pressure on the leash. Once they get the concept, I will walk forward confidently...if the puppy plants I will stop but will keep pressure on the leash. As soon as the puppy gives to the pressure and moves forward, I will continue walking confidently forward.

Oh I forgot to mention. When I first start leash training, I will put the leash on out in the years and let the puppy lead me around to build her confidence.
 

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velcro human
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My pup cried the first few days home, it's normal.

Just for safe measure, I would take her to the vet and have them look her over, worms, thyroid, ear infection, bladder infection, along with all the vaccinations, ect, ect.. (you should do that with a new puppy anyway, esp. since you already have a dog in the house)

Good luck with your girlie
 

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i was going to suggest getting her a full baseline workup at the vet. she might just not feel good.
 

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Mo's Mom
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Def listen to the people here and get her checked out by a vet, and continue to work on training... but I just wanted to say, my boy is nearly 10 months old, and is just incredibly vocal. He whines CONSTANTLY, and groans, and barks, and chatters, and yodels lol! And from the other people I know with dobes... it is not uncommon.
 

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Guardian
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Welcome :)

This is a very clingy, vocal, whiney breed.

When I picked up Rou I was asked if I wanted one of his bothers or sisters because he was a little arse--- I too was up for a challenge.

How is your girl in her crate? For 2-3 weeks from the day I brought Rou home, at night in his crate he would bite the bars, scream at the top of his lungs, whine, bark, rattle the cage, you name it! It sounded like you were killing him every night. I got little to no sleep during this time period. The best thing you can do, as already stated is ignore her.

Now did you go through a reputable breeder for your dobie girl?
It would be a good idea to get her to a vet not only to be checked out, but to get used to being in that environment. Also be sure to have a sample of stool checked for parasites as they can make a dog feel crummy. Do you have her on a good diet?

Socialization once she is fully immunized will be key, not only for your doberman, but for your boxer too. If your girl is this young and already independent, this is going to have to be very important.
 

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Small Handful of Woman
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Your pup is still very young and very new. After you make sure she's completely healthy, the most important thing is to make her feel comfortable and safe. She is a baby that has been removed from everything she knows.
I don't think it is a good idea to give verbal corrections at ALL at this stage. She doesn't understand what you are objecting to and will only feel more anxious about your displeasure. The more safe and comfortable she feels, the more the whining will subside.
I agree that socialization will be of primary importance for both your puppies.
Welcome! I hope we get lots of pictures of your babies!!! :D
 
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I would seriously rethink keeping both puppies... You said you'd done some reading on littermate syndrome; have you done enough? It is very, very difficult to raise two puppies together. I work in rescue and have seen many, many dogs surrendered to rescue because people tried to raise two pups at the same time.
 

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The Dopie Dobie
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Puppies are hard to raise, do you have previous experience with puppies before these guys? Dobes are a whinny breed hence she may not be feeling well or she could just be very vocal. Does she whine more when you are not in the same room (separation anxiety) or is it non stop. After she is vet clear let us know if the whining persists


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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you all for the posts. My apologies for posting such a late reply. Time flies when you're dealing with pups, work, and school.

Karma (my doberman) has stopped her whining most of the time. She was initially whining constantly, but after her first vet visit, she checked out all healthy except an abnormal high white blood cell count from a urine test. We got her on an anti-biotic for UTI, and she just finished her pills and it seems to have stopped the constant whining.

She does still whine though when we try to get her to sit still, such as sit on the couch with us while we're watching a movie or doing homework. This morning even, my partner brought her into the bedroom while I was still sleeping and set her in bed with me. I laid with her for half an hour and she just whined the whole time until I finally got up. And my partner just gave her a bath and she was perfectly fine. But when it came time to dry her in the towel, which we had her wrapped up in our arms, she whined. So it seems whenever she's restricted in any way, (held or lying next to us), then she whines.

We have tried taking her on walks, but she just wants nothing to do with it. She will fight us every step of the way. We've tried enticing her with treats, having Rebel (our boxer) show her how to walk with us (because he's great on walks), but she just refuses to walk. She'll just lie down on the sidewalk until we eventually pick her up and go back home. We are trying to have the leash on her when she's in the house, but we haven't yet tried it much outside in the fenced-in back yard, so we will have to try that and see how it goes.

As for crate training, we didn't have to do any training. She loves her crate and will just go in there on her own when she feels like it. She rarely whines when in there. If she does whine, we do ignore her and wait until she has stopped whining for about 15 minutes before we go into the room where her crate is to let her back out.

As for the breeder, we honestly aren't sure how reputable she was. She had been breeding dobes for 23 years, and seemed she was very strict on her breeding process (only one puppy litter per 12 month period for a given female, and only one litter in the house at a time). It did concern us that she had a total of 14 dobes, but she does live on a very large acreage and the dobes did seem pretty well taken care of, but I know looks can be deceiving. The only thing that really bothered me is that the breeder and her husband both smoked like chimneys and did so in the house with the dogs! Can't imagine how awful that must be for the dogs.

I know we've both had our bouts of regret and consideration of getting rid of Karma, but I just can't bring myself to do that. I will not give up on her. We are getting both her and Rebel into a Life Skills class with Go Dogs (Welcome to the GoDogsOmaha.ORG Web Site.) which starts in June. I really hope some training will help. There is also a behavior specialist trainer here in Omaha who also trains K-9 units (www.k-9obedience.com), so we're considering that if need be.
 

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I don't know how long you have had the puppy but they do need time to bond to you. With another puppy, you need to make sure she trusts you and that you give her time to get well from the infection. This will need to be rechecked when the meds are finished. Not uncommon to have to do a second round to clear it up. I would work on bonding with her and leave training or any corrections to later on.

I wouldn't put her on the bed when you are sleeping. If she was whinning, she didn't like it for some reason.

On lead training, once the puppy is bonded they will usually bond to you and follow you around. Make sure she has a collar and that you aren't forcing her to go with you. When she is well, try taking her on the lead when she is hungry and that might work. Also, we use those rope leads, smaller and softer but they are the type that is used on horses. The lead just slips over their heads. You can leave it on in the house when you can watch her and they learn that it isn't a bad thing. Don't ever pull her.

It is very hard to have two pups at one time. When you let her out, go out there with her and encourage her. When a puppy is whinning all the time, there is insecurity issues. They are normally happy outgoing puppies but sometimes trama or poor training or other things can imprint fear or problems. Bond with her and go from there.
She's a baby.
 

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Your pup is still very young and very new. After you make sure she's completely healthy, the most important thing is to make her feel comfortable and safe. She is a baby that has been removed from everything she knows.
I don't think it is a good idea to give verbal corrections at ALL at this stage. She doesn't understand what you are objecting to and will only feel more anxious about your displeasure. The more safe and comfortable she feels, the more the whining will subside.
I agree that socialization will be of primary importance for both your puppies.
Welcome! I hope we get lots of pictures of your babies!!! :D
I agree with dobedreams I have a 3month old dobe also. you have to really show them love especially now because she doesn't know what your house is to her. Give it some time she will stop if it doesnt have anything to do with her health. Also, when ur pups sleep put a blanket on top of her cage so it covers it all and ur dog learns that that is sleep time ... She will bark and be scared when u first do it but be patient. Goodluck
 

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I would do what most of the other posters recommended and first have her checked out and make sure she isn't whining about any pain or something you need to correct. If she IS fine just don't give into her whining. Kind of like a child; of you buy a child a toy every time he cries he knows how to get what he wants.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I don't know how long you have had the puppy but they do need time to bond to you. With another puppy, you need to make sure she trusts you and that you give her time to get well from the infection. This will need to be rechecked when the meds are finished. Not uncommon to have to do a second round to clear it up. I would work on bonding with her and leave training or any corrections to later on.

I wouldn't put her on the bed when you are sleeping. If she was whinning, she didn't like it for some reason.

On lead training, once the puppy is bonded they will usually bond to you and follow you around. Make sure she has a collar and that you aren't forcing her to go with you. When she is well, try taking her on the lead when she is hungry and that might work. Also, we use those rope leads, smaller and softer but they are the type that is used on horses. The lead just slips over their heads. You can leave it on in the house when you can watch her and they learn that it isn't a bad thing. Don't ever pull her.

It is very hard to have two pups at one time. When you let her out, go out there with her and encourage her. When a puppy is whinning all the time, there is insecurity issues. They are normally happy outgoing puppies but sometimes trama or poor training or other things can imprint fear or problems. Bond with her and go from there.
She's a baby.

Thank you for this helpful info. I actually have gotten some good bonding time in lately, though not in a very good way. Unfortunately, Karma had to go to the animal ER last Tuesday with a temp over 106. She stayed overnight and was transferred to our regular vet for observation the next day. She developed a lameness in her rear left leg that just got worse. We did get to bring her home as long as one of us (me or my partner) were with her at all times. Over the next two days, her fever spiked up to 104.5 one day, then 105 the next. She also stopped using her rear right leg as well, so when she went out to potty, she'd try to squat, but just fall down and then either void or defecate right there lying down on the ground. I had to hold her up in a squatting position for her to finish. We took her back to the vet again and the vet explained it could possibly be either a tick borne illness, or Panosteitis. We did x-rays and the vet determined it was indeed Panosteitis. She got anti-inflamatory meds and some anti-biotics just to be on the safe side. The next day, she was walking almost fully again. However, we will be contacting the vet as she has vomited four times today, which one of the meds warned to contact the vet if vomiting occurs persistently.

Anyway, because she was so lethargic, she would just lie on my lap constantly, and I would always be with her, petting her, talking to her softly, trying to comfort her as best I can. She did sleep with me the first night back from the vet, which was so nice for me, but I know she was in pain, and that just breaks my heart. We are monitoring her VERY closely, and we will be contacting our vet about the vomiting first thing in the morning; Luckily for us, the vet is open on Sunday.
 

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Your post said you already had the dog to the vet. Pano is very painful and usually requires pain meds. I would want to know exactly what is wrong with the puppy and if the other pup can also get sick. If the puppy is throwing up, you need to get her back to the vet. Let us know.

Bonding is just the normal part of it all and it always takes time. This is why some of us are saying train and bond with one at a time. It is easier and produces better results. When you have two all at once, they sometimes will bond to each other instead of you.
 
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